Skip to content.Skip to side navigation.
GPO Access Home Page.
Jump to selected topic.
Navigation Bar
About.Help. A-Z Resource List. Locate a Federal Depository Library. Buy Publications. Legislative. Executive. Judicial.
National Archives and Records Administration logo.
Database Features.
Browse
Simple Search
Advanced Search
* Boolean
  * Proximity
Search History
Search Tips
Corrections

Latest Updates

User Info
FAQs
Agency List
e-CFR Main Page
Related Resources
Code of Federal Regulations
Federal Register
List of CFR
Sections Affected
Regulations.gov
Unified Agenda
All NARA Publications
About Government.
Ben's Guide Logo.
Get Adobe Reader

blue pill
e-CFR Data is current as of October 17, 2008


Title 46: Shipping

Browse Previous | Browse Next

PART 131—OPERATIONS

Section Contents

Subpart A—Notice of Casualty and Records of Voyage

§ 131.110   Notice and records.

Subpart B—Markings on Vessels

§ 131.210   Hulls.
§ 131.220   Drafts.
§ 131.230   Loadlines and decklines.

Subpart C—Preparations for Emergencies

§ 131.310   List of crew members and offshore workers.
§ 131.320   Safety orientation for offshore workers.
§ 131.330   Emergency instructions.
§ 131.340   Recommended placard for emergency instructions.
§ 131.350   Station bill.
§ 131.360   Responsibilities of licensed or certificated individuals.

Subpart D—Sufficiency and Supervision of Crew of Survival Craft

§ 131.410   Certificate of proficiency.
§ 131.420   Manning and supervision.

Subpart E—Tests, Drills, and Inspections

§ 131.505   Steering gear, whistle, and means of communication.
§ 131.510   Draft and loadline markings.
§ 131.513   Verification of compliance with applicable stability requirements.
§ 131.515   Periodic sanitary inspections.
§ 131.520   Hatches and other openings.
§ 131.525   Emergency lighting and power.
§ 131.530   Abandon-ship training and drills.
§ 131.535   Firefighting training and drills.
§ 131.540   Operational readiness.
§ 131.545   Maintenance in general.
§ 131.550   Maintenance of falls.
§ 131.555   Spare parts and repair equipment.
§ 131.560   Weekly tests and inspections.
§ 131.565   Monthly tests and inspections.
§ 131.570   Quarterly inspections.
§ 131.575   Yearly inspections and repair.
§ 131.580   Servicing of inflatable liferafts, inflatable lifejackets, inflatable buoyant apparatus, and inflated rescue boats.
§ 131.585   Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.
§ 131.590   Firefighting equipment.

Subpart F—Logs

§ 131.610   Logbooks and records.
§ 131.620   Matters that must be logged.
§ 131.630   Entries in official logbooks.

Subpart G—Work Vests

§ 131.710   Approved work vests.
§ 131.720   Use.
§ 131.730   Shipboard stowage.
§ 131.740   Shipboard inspections.

Subpart H—Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment

§ 131.800   General.
§ 131.805   General alarm bell, switch.
§ 131.810   General alarm bell.
§ 131.815   Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system.
§ 131.820   Branch lines of fire-extinguishing system.
§ 131.825   Controls of fire-extinguishing system.
§ 131.830   Fire-hose stations.
§ 131.835   Portable fire extinguishers.
§ 131.840   Emergency lighting.
§ 131.845   Instructions for shift of steering gear.
§ 131.850   Rudder orders.
§ 131.855   Lifeboats and rescue boats.
§ 131.860   Rigid liferafts.
§ 131.865   Inflatable liferafts and inflatable buoyant apparatus.
§ 131.870   Life floats and buoyant apparatus.
§ 131.875   Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.
§ 131.880   Fire hoses and axes.
§ 131.890   EPIRBs and SARTs.
§ 131.893   Watertight doors and watertight hatches.
§ 131.896   Remote stopping-systems.
§ 131.899   Fire dampers.

Subpart I—Miscellaneous

§ 131.905   Statutory penalties.
§ 131.910   Notices to mariners and aids to navigation.
§ 131.915   Persons allowed in pilothouse and on navigational bridge.
§ 131.920   Level of manning.
§ 131.925   Compliance with provisions of Certificate of Inspection.
§ 131.930   Display of stability letter.
§ 131.935   Prevention of oil pollution.
§ 131.940   Marine sanitation device.
§ 131.945   Display of plans.
§ 131.950   Placard on lifesaving signals and helicopter recovery.
§ 131.955   Display of license.
§ 131.960   Use of auto-pilot.
§ 131.965   Sounding of whistle.
§ 131.970   Unauthorized lighting.
§ 131.975   Searchlights.
§ 131.980   Lookouts and watches.


Authority:   33 U.S.C. 1321(j); 46 U.S.C. 3306, 6101, 10104; E.O. 12234, 3 CFR, 1980 Comp., p. 277; E.O. 12777, 3 CFR, 1991 Comp., p. 351; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1.

Source:   CGD 82–004 and CGD 86–074, 62 FR 49340, Sept. 19, 1997, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—Notice of Casualty and Records of Voyage
top
§ 131.110   Notice and records.
top

Each vessel must meet the requirements of part 4 of this chapter for reporting marine casualties and retaining voyage records.

Subpart B—Markings on Vessels
top
§ 131.210   Hulls.
top

The hull of each vessel must be marked as required by parts 67 and 69 of this chapter.

§ 131.220   Drafts.
top

(a) Each vessel must have the drafts of the vessel plainly and legibly marked upon the stem and upon the sternpost or rudderpost, or at any place at the stern of the vessel that may be necessary for easy observance. The bottom of each mark must indicate the draft.

(b) Each draft must be taken from the bottom of the keel to the surface of the water at the location of the marks.

(c) When, because of raked stem or cutaway skeg, the keel does not extend forward or aft to the draft markings, the datum line from which the draft is taken must be the line of the bottom of the keel projected forward or aft, as the case may be, to where the line meets that of the draft markings projected downward.

(d) When a skeg or other appendage extends below the line of the keel, the draft at the end of the vessel adjacent to that appendage must be measured to a line tangent to the lowest part of the appendage and parallel to the line of the bottom of the keel.

(e) Drafts must be separated so that the projections of the marks onto a vertical plane are of uniform height, equal to the vertical spacing between consecutive marks.

(f) Marks must be painted in a color contrasting with that of the hull.

(g) Where marks are obscured because of operational constraints or by protrusions, the vessel must be fitted with a reliable draft-indicating system from which the drafts at bow and stern can be determined.

§ 131.230   Loadlines and decklines.
top

Each vessel assigned a loadline must have loadline markings and deck-line markings permanently scribed or embossed as required by subchapter E of this chapter.

Subpart C—Preparations for Emergencies
top
§ 131.310   List of crew members and offshore workers.
top

(a) The master of each vessel shall keep a correct list containing the name of each person that embarks upon and disembarks from the vessel.

(b) The list required by paragraph (a) of this section must be prepared before the vessel's departure on a voyage, and deposited ashore—

(1) At the facility from which the crew members and offshore workers embarked;

(2) In a well-marked place at the vessel's normal berth; or

(3) With a representative of the owner or managing operator of the vessel.

§ 131.320   Safety orientation for offshore workers.
top

(a) Before a vessel gets under way on a voyage, the master shall ensure that suitable public announcements are made informing each offshore worker of—

(1) In general terms, emergency and evacuation procedures;

(2) Locations of emergency exits and of embarkation areas for survival craft;

(3) Locations of stowage of lifejackets and immersion suits;

(4) With demonstration, proper method or methods of donning and adjusting lifejackets and immersion suits of the type or types carried on the vessel;

(5) Locations of the instruction placards for lifejackets and other lifesaving devices;

(6) Explanation that each offshore worker shall don an immersion suit and a lifejacket when the master determines that hazardous conditions do or might exist but that offshore workers may don lifejackets whenever they feel it necessary;

(7) Which hazardous conditions might require the donning of lifejackets and immersion suits;

(8) Types and locations of any other lifesaving device carried on the vessel;

(9) Locations and contents of the “Emergency Instructions” required by §131.330;

(10) Survival craft to which assigned;

(11) Any hazardous materials on the vessel; and

(12) Any conditions or circumstances that constitute a risk to safety.

(b) The master of each vessel shall ensure that each offshore worker boarding the vessel on a voyage after the initial public announcement has been made, as required by paragraph (a) of this section, also hears the information in paragraph (a) of this section.

§ 131.330   Emergency instructions.
top

(a) Except as otherwise provided by this section, the master of each vessel shall prepare and post durable emergency-instruction placards in conspicuous locations accessible to the crew members and offshore workers.

(b) The instruction placards must contain the recommended “Emergency Instructions” listed in §131.340 that, in the judgment of the cognizant OCMI, apply. The placards must be further designed to address the equipment, arrangement, and operation peculiar to each vessel.

§ 131.340   Recommended placard for emergency instructions.
top

The following are the recommended format and content of the placard for emergency instructions:

EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS

(a) Rough weather at sea, crossing of hazardous bars, or flooding. (1) Close each watertight and weathertight door, hatch, and air-port to prevent taking water aboard or further flooding in the vessel.

(2) Keep bilges dry to prevent loss of stability from water in bilges. Use power-driven bilge pump, hand pump, and buckets to dewater.

(3) Align fire pumps to serve as bilge pumps if possible.

(4) Check, for leakage, each intake and discharge line that penetrates the hull.

(5) Offshore workers remain seated and evenly distributed.

(6) Offshore workers don immersion suits (if required aboard) or lifejackets if the going becomes very rough, if the vessel is about to cross a hazardous bar, if flooding begins, or when ordered to by the master.

(7) Never abandon the vessel unless actually forced to, or ordered to by the master.

(8) Prepare survival craft—life floats, (inflatable) rafts, (inflatable) buoyant apparatus, and boats—for launching.

(b) “Man overboard”. (1) Throw a ring buoy into the water as close to the person overboard as possible.

(2) Post a lookout to keep the person overboard in sight.

(3) Launch the rescue boat and maneuver it to pick up the person overboard, or maneuver the vessel to pick up the person.

(4) Have a crew member put on an immersion suit or lifejacket, have a safety line made fast to the crew member, and have the crew member stand by to jump into the water to assist the person overboard if necessary.

(5) If the person overboard is not immediately located—

(i) Notify other vessels in the vicinity, and the Coast Guard; and

(ii) Continue searching until released by the Coast Guard.

(c) Fire. (1) Cut off air to the fire: close hatches, ports, doors, manual ventilators, and the like and shut off the ventilation system.

(2) De-energize electrical systems supplying the affected compartment.

(3) Immediately use a portable fire extinguisher aimed at the base of the flames. Never use water on electrical fires.

(4) If the fire is in machinery spaces, shut off the fuel supply and ventilation system and activate any fixed extinguishing-system.

(5) Maneuver the vessel to minimize the effect of wind on the fire.

(6) If unable to control the fire, notify other vessels in the vicinity, and the Coast Guard.

(7) Move offshore workers away from fire; have them don lifejackets and, if necessary, prepare to abandon the vessel.

§ 131.350   Station bill.
top

(a) The master of each vessel shall post a station bill if the vessel's Certificate of Inspection requires more than four crew members, including the master.

(b) The station bill must be posted in the pilothouse and in conspicuous places in crew members' and offshore workers' accommodations.

(c) The station bill must set forth the special duties and duty stations of each crew member for various emergencies. The duties must, as far as possible, be comparable to and compatible with the regular work of the member. The duties must include at least the following and should comprise any other duties necessary for the proper handling of a particular emergency:

(1) The closing of hatches, air-ports, watertight doors, vents, and scuppers, and of intake valves and discharge lines that penetrate the hull; the stopping of fans and ventilating systems; and the operating of safety equipment.

(2) The preparing and launching of survival craft and rescue boats.

(3) The extinguishing of fire.

(4) The mustering of offshore workers, which includes—

(i) Assembling them and seeing that they are properly dressed and have donned their immersion suits and lifejackets; and

(ii) Directing them to their appointed stations.

§ 131.360   Responsibilities of licensed or certificated individuals.
top

Nothing in the emergency instructions or in any station bill required by this subpart exempts any licensed or certificated individual from the exercise of good judgment in an emergency.

Subpart D—Sufficiency and Supervision of Crew of Survival Craft
top
§ 131.410   Certificate of proficiency.
top

A merchant mariner's document with an endorsement of lifeboatman or another inclusive rating under part 12 of this title is evidence of training in survival craft and serves as a certificate of proficiency. For this subpart, a “certificated” person is a person holding a merchant mariner's document with such an endorsement.

§ 131.420   Manning and supervision.
top

(a) There must be enough trained persons aboard each survival craft to muster and assist untrained persons.

(b) Except as permitted by paragraph (c)(2) of this section, there must be enough deck officers, able seamen, or other certificated persons aboard each survival craft to manage the launching and handling of the survival craft.

(c) One person must be placed in charge of each survival craft to be used.

(1) Except as permitted by paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the person in command must be a deck officer, able seaman, or other certificated person.

(2) Considering the nature of the voyage, the number of persons permitted aboard, and the characteristics of the vessel, including gross tonnage, the cognizant OCMI may permit persons practiced in the handling of liferafts to be placed in charge of liferafts instead of persons required under paragraph (c)(1) of this section.

(3) A deck officer, able seaman, or other certificated person shall serve as second-in-command for each lifeboat either—

(i) Carried on a vessel in ocean service; or

(ii) Permitted to carry more than 40 persons.

(d) The person in charge and the second-in-command of each survival craft shall have a list of crew members and offshore workers assigned to the craft and shall see that the crew members are acquainted with their duties.

(e) Each motorized survival craft must have assigned a person capable of operating the engine and carrying out minor adjustments.

(f) The master shall ensure that the persons required under paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section are equitably distributed among the vessel's survival crafts.

Subpart E—Tests, Drills, and Inspections
top
§ 131.505   Steering gear, whistle, and means of communication.
top

(a) On each vessel expected to be away from shore for more than 48 hours, the master shall examine and test the steering gear, the whistle, and the means of communication between the pilothouse and the engine room 12 or fewer hours before departure. On every other vessel, the master shall do the same at least once a week.

(b) The date of each test and examination and the condition of the equipment must be noted in the vessel's logbook.

§ 131.510   Draft and loadline markings.
top

(a) The master of each vessel on an ocean or coastwise voyage shall enter in the vessel's logbook the drafts of the vessel, forward and aft, when leaving port.

(b) The master of each vessel subject to the requirements of subchapter E of this chapter shall, upon departure from port on an ocean or coastwise voyage, enter in the vessel's logbook a statement of the position of the loadline markings, port and starboard, relative to the surface of the water in which the vessel is then floating.

(c) If the master, when recording drafts, compensates for the density of the water in which the vessel is floating, he or she shall note this density in the vessel's logbook.

§ 131.513   Verification of compliance with applicable stability requirements.
top

(a) After loading but before departure, and at other times necessary to assure the safety of the vessel, the master shall verify that the vessel complies with requirements in its trim-and-stability book, stability letter, Certificate of Inspection, and Loadline Certificate, whichever apply, and then enter a statement of the verification in the log book. The vessel may not leave port until it is in compliance with these requirements.

(b) When determining compliance with applicable stability requirements, the master shall ascertain the vessel's draft, trim, and stability as necessary; and any stability calculations made in support of the determination must remain aboard the vessel for the duration of the voyage.

§ 131.515   Periodic sanitary inspections.
top

(a) The master shall make periodic inspections of the quarters, toilet and washing spaces, serving pantries, galleys, and the like, to ensure that those spaces are maintained in a sanitary condition.

(b) The master shall enter in the vessel's logbook the results of these inspections.

§ 131.520   Hatches and other openings.
top

Before any vessel leaves protected waters, the master shall ensure that the vessel's exposed cargo hatches and other openings in the hull are closed; made properly watertight by the use of tarpaulins, gaskets, or similar devices; and properly secured for sea.

§ 131.525   Emergency lighting and power.
top

(a) The master of each vessel shall ensure that the emergency lighting and power systems are tested at least once each week that the vessel is operated, to verify that they work.

(b) The master shall ensure that emergency generators driven by internal-combustion engines run under load for at least 2 hours at least once each month that the vessel is operated.

(c) The master shall ensure that storage batteries driving fitted systems for emergency lighting and power are tested at least once each 6 months that the vessel is operated, to demonstrate the ability of the batteries to supply the emergency loads for the period specified by Table 112.05–5(a) of this chapter for cargo vessels.

(d) The date of each test and the condition and performance of the apparatus must be noted in the vessel's logbook.

§ 131.530   Abandon-ship training and drills.
top

(a) Material for abandon-ship training must be aboard each vessel. The material must consist of a manual of one or more volumes, or audiovisual training aids, or both.

(1) The material must contain instructions and information about the lifesaving appliances aboard the vessel and about the best methods of survival. Any manual must be written in easily understood terms, illustrated wherever possible.

(2) If a manual is used, there must be a copy in each messroom and recreation room for crew members or in each stateroom for them. If audiovisual aids are used, they must be incorporated in the training sessions aboard under paragraph (d) of this section.

(3) The material must explain the—

(i) Method of donning immersion suits and lifejackets carried aboard;

(ii) Mustering at assigned stations;

(iii) Proper boarding, launching, and clearing of survival craft and rescue boats;

(iv) Method of launching survival craft by people within them;

(v) Method of releasing survival craft from launching-appliances;

(vi) Use of devices for protecting survival craft in launching-areas, where appropriate;

(vii) Illumination of launching-areas;

(viii) Use of each item of survival equipment;

(ix) Instructions for emergency repair of lifesaving appliances;

(x) Use of radio lifesaving-appliances, with illustrations;

(xi) Use of sea anchors;

(xii) Use of engine and accessories, where appropriate;

(xiii) Recovery of survival craft and rescue boats, including stowage and securing;

(xiv) Hazards of exposure and need for warm clothing;

(xv) Best use of survival craft for survival; and

(xvi) Methods of retrieving personnel, including use of helicopter-mounted rescue gear (slings, baskets, stretchers) and vessel's line-throwing apparatus.

(b) An abandon-ship drill must be held on each vessel in alternate weeks. If none can be held during the appointed week, because of bad weather or other unavoidable constraint, one must be held at the first opportunity afterward. If the crew changes more than once in any 2 weeks, one must be held as soon after the arrival of each crew as practicable.

(1) Any crew member excused from an abandon-ship drill must participate in the next one, so that each member participates in at least one each month. Unless more than 25 percent of the members have participated in one on that particular vessel in the previous month, one must be held before the vessel leaves port if reasonable and practicable; but, unless the Commandant (G-MOC) accepts alternative arrangements as at least equivalent, one must be held not later than 24 hours after the vessel leaves port in any event.

(2)(i) On a voyage likely to take more than 24 hours to complete, a muster of offshore workers must be held on departure. The master shall ensure that each worker is assigned to a survival craft and is directed to its location. Each person in charge of such a craft shall maintain a list of workers assigned to the craft.

(ii) On a voyage likely to take 24 hours or less to complete, the master shall call the attention of each offshore worker to the emergency instructions required by §131.330.

(3) Each abandon-ship drill must include—

(i) Summoning of crew members and offshore workers to survival craft with the general alarm;

(ii) Simulation of an abandon-ship emergency that varies from drill to drill;

(iii) Reporting of crew members and offshore workers to survival craft, and preparing for, and demonstrating the duties assigned under the procedure described in the station bill for, the particular abandon-ship emergency being simulated;

(iv) Checking to see that crew members and offshore workers are suitably dressed;

(v) Checking to see that immersion suits and lifejackets are correctly donned;

(vi) Lowering of at least one lifeboat (far enough that the davit head has completed its travel and the fall wire of the lifeboat has begun to pay out) or, if no lifeboats are required, lowering of one rescue boat, after any necessary preparation for launching;

(vii) Starting and operating of the engine of the lifeboat or rescue boat; and

(viii) Operation of davits used for launching liferafts.

(4) As far as practicable, at successive drills different lifeboats must be lowered to meet the requirements of paragraph (b)(3)(vi) of this section.

(5) As far as practicable, each abandon-ship drill must be conducted as if there were an actual emergency.

(6) Each lifeboat must be launched with its assigned crew aboard during an abandon-ship drill, and be maneuvered in the water, at least once each 3 months that the vessel is operated.

(7) Each rescue boat must be launched with its assigned crew aboard and be maneuvered in the water—

(i) Once each month that the vessel is operated, if reasonable and practicable; but,

(ii) In any event, at least once each 3 months that the vessel is operated.

(8) If drills for launching lifeboats and rescue boats are carried out with the vessel making headway, the drills must, because of the danger involved, be practiced only in waters where the drills are safe, under the supervision of an officer experienced in such drills.

(9) At least one abandon-ship drill each 3 months must be held at night, unless the master determines it unsafe.

(10) Emergency lighting for mustering and abandonment must be tested at each abandon-ship drill.

(c) The master of each vessel carrying immersion suits shall ensure that—

(1) Each crew member either—

(i) Wears an immersion suit in at least one abandon-ship drill a month unless it is impracticable because of warm weather; or

(ii) Participates in at least one immersion-suit drill a month that includes donning an immersion suit and being instructed in its use;

(2) In each abandon-ship drill, each offshore worker aboard is instructed in the use of immersion suits; and

(3) Each offshore worker is told at the beginning of the voyage where immersion suits are stowed aboard and is encouraged to read the instructions for donning and using the suits.

(d) Each crew member aboard the vessel must be given training in the use of lifesaving appliances and in the duties assigned by the station bill.

(1) Except as provided by paragraph (d)(2) of this section, training aboard in the use of the vessel's lifesaving appliances, including equipment on survival craft, must be given to each crew member as soon as possible but not later than 2 weeks after the member joins the vessel.

(2) If a crew member is on a regularly scheduled rotating assignment to a vessel, training aboard in the use of the vessel's lifesaving appliances, including equipment on survival craft, must be given to the member not later than 2 weeks after the member first joins the vessel.

(3) Each crew member must be instructed in the use of the vessel's lifesaving equipment and appliances and in survival at sea during alternate weeks, normally in the weeks when abandon-ship drills are not held. If individual instructional sessions cover different parts of the vessel's lifesaving system, they must cover each part of the vessel's lifesaving equipment and appliances each 2 months. Each member must be instructed in at least—

(i) Operation and use of the vessel's inflatable liferafts;

(ii) Problems of hypothermia, first aid for hypothermia, and other appropriate procedures; and

(iii) Special procedures necessary for use of the vessel's lifesaving equipment and appliances in heavy weather.

(4) Training in the use of davit-launched inflatable liferafts must take place at intervals of not more than 4 months on each vessel with such liferafts. Whenever practicable this must include the inflation and lowering of a liferaft. If this liferaft is a special one intended for training only, and is not part of the vessel's lifesaving system, it must be conspicuously so marked.

(e) Dates when musters are held, details of abandon-ship drills, drills on other lifesaving equipment and appliances, and training aboard must be entered in the vessel's official logbook. Each logbook entry must include the following, as applicable:

(1) Time and date.

(2) Length of drill or training session.

(3) Identification of survival craft used in drills.

(4) Subject of training session.

(5) Statement on the condition of the equipment used.

(6) Unless a full muster, drill, or training session is held at the appointed time, the circumstances and the extent of the muster, drill, or training session held.

§ 131.535   Firefighting training and drills.
top

(a) A fire drill must be held on each vessel, normally on alternate weeks. It must not be held as part of the abandon-ship drill, nor immediately before or after the abandon-ship drill. If none can be held on schedule, because of bad weather or other unavoidable constraint, one must be held at the next opportunity.

(b) Any crew member excused from a fire drill must participate in the next one, so that each member participates in at least one each month. Unless more than 25 percent of the members have participated in one on that particular vessel in the previous month, one must be held before the vessel leaves port if reasonable and practicable; but, unless the Commandant (G-MOC) accepts alternative arrangements as at least equivalent, one must be held not later than 24 hours after the vessel leaves port in any event.

(c) Each fire drill must include—

(1) Summoning of crew members and offshore workers to their stations with the general alarm;

(2) Simulation of a fire emergency that varies from drill to drill;

(3) Reporting of crew members and offshore workers to stations, and preparing for, and demonstrating of the duties assigned under the procedure described in the station bill for, the particular fire emergency being simulated;

(4) Starting of fire pumps and use of a sufficient number of outlets to determine that the system is working properly;

(5) Bringing out each breathing apparatus and other item of rescue and safety equipment from the emergency-equipment lockers, and demonstrating of the use of each item by the person or persons that will make use of it;

(6) Operation of each watertight door;

(7) Operation of each self-closing fire door;

(8) Closing of each fire door and each door within the fire boundary; and

(9) Closing of each ventilation closure of each space protected by a fixed fire-extinguishing system.

(d) Each fire drill must, as far as practicable, be conducted as if there were an actual emergency.

(e) The dates when fire drills are held, and details of training in fire fighting and of fire drills, must be entered in the vessel's official logbook. Each logbook entry must include the following, as applicable:

(1) Time and date.

(2) Length of drill or training session.

(3) Number and lengths of hose used.

(4) Subject of training session.

(5) Statement on the condition of the equipment used.

(6) Unless a full drill or training session is held at the appointed time, the circumstances and the extent of the drill or training session held.

§ 131.540   Operational readiness.
top

(a) Except as provided by §131.545(e) of this subpart, ach lifesaving appliance and each item of equipment for a lifeboat, liferaft, survival craft, rescue boat, life float, or buoyant apparatus must be in good working order and ready for immediate use before the vessel leaves port and at any time when the vessel is away from port.

(b) Each deck where a lifeboat, liferaft, survival craft, rescue boat, life float, or buoyant apparatus is stowed, launched, or boarded must be kept clear of obstructions that would interfere with the breaking out, launching, or boarding of the lifesaving appliance.

§ 131.545   Maintenance in general.
top

(a) For each lifesaving appliance, the manufacturer's instructions for maintenance of the appliances aboard must be aboard and must include the following:

(1) Checklists for use in the inspections required by §131.565(a) of this subpart.

(2) Instructions for maintenance and repair.

(3) A schedule of periodic maintenance.

(4) A diagram of lubrication points with the recommended lubricants.

(5) A list of replaceable parts.

(6) A list of sources of spare parts.

(7) A log for records of inspections, maintenance, and repair.

(b) The master shall ensure that maintenance is carried out to comply with the instructions required by paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) For lifesaving appliances constructed on or before July 1, 1986, paragraph (a) of this section need be complied with only to the extent that appliances' manufacturers' instructions are available.

(d) The cognizant OCMI may accept, instead of the instructions required by paragraph (a) of this section, a program for planned shipboard maintenance that includes the items listed in that paragraph.

(e) If lifeboats and rigid liferafts are maintained and repaired on the vessel while the vessel is under way, there must be enough lifeboats and liferafts available for use on the vessel to accommodate each person aboard the vessel.

(f) Except in an emergency, no extensive repairs or alterations may be made to any lifesaving appliance without advance notice to the cognizant OCMI. As far as possible, each repair or alteration must be made to comply with the requirements for the appliance in subchapter Q of this chapter. This OCMI may require each appliance that has been extensively repaired or in any way altered to undergo each pertinent test in subchapter Q of this chapter.

(g) The master shall report each emergency repair or alteration to a lifesaving appliance, as soon as practicable, either to the OCMI in the next port in the United States where the vessel calls or, if the vessel does not regularly call at ports in the United States, to the OCMI responsible for the next foreign port where the vessel calls.

(h) No lifeboat or rigid liferaft may be repaired or reconditioned for use on a vessel other than the one it was originally built for, unless specifically permitted by the cognizant OCMI. The lifeboat or rigid liferaft must be so repaired or reconditioned under the supervision of this OCMI, unless he or she specifically allows otherwise.

§ 131.550   Maintenance of falls.
top

(a) Each fall used with a launching appliance must be turned end for end at intervals of not more than 30 months.

(b) Each fall used with a launching appliance must be renewed either when necessary because of deterioration or after the passage of not more than 5 years, whichever occurs earlier.

(c) Each fall used with a launching appliance must have a corrosion-resistant tag permanently marked with—

(1) The date the new fall was installed; and

(2) The last date, if any, the fall was turned end for end.

§ 131.555   Spare parts and repair equipment.
top

Spare parts and repair equipment must be provided for each lifesaving appliance and component that either is subject to excessive wear or consumption or needs to be replaced regularly. These parts and equipment must be kept aboard the OSV, except that, if the vessel operates daily out of the same shore base, they may be kept at that base.

§ 131.560   Weekly tests and inspections.
top

The following tests and inspections must be carried out weekly:

(a) Each lifesaving appliance and launching appliance must be visually inspected to ensure that it is ready for use.

(b) Each engine of a lifeboat or a rescue boat must be run ahead and astern for not less than 3 minutes, unless the ambient temperature is below the minimal temperature required for starting the engine.

(c) The general alarm system must be activated.

(d) Each battery for starting the engine of a lifeboat or a rescue boat, or for energizing a searchlight, a fixed installation of a radio in a lifeboat, or a portable radio, must be brought up to full charge at least once a week if the battery is—

(1) Of a type that requires recharging; and

(2) Not connected to a device that keeps it continuously charged.

(e) The transmitter of each fixed installation of a radio in a lifeboat and that of each portable radio must be tried out at least once a week with a dummy antenna load.

§ 131.565   Monthly tests and inspections.
top

(a) Each lifesaving appliance, including lifeboat equipment, must be inspected monthly against the checklist required by §131.545(a)(1) of this subpart to ensure that it is aboard and in good order. A report of the inspection, including a statement on the condition of the appliance, must be entered in the vessel's logbook.

(b) Each Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) and each Search and Rescue Transponder (SART), other than an EPIRB or SART in an inflatable liferaft, must be tested monthly. The EPIRB must be tested using the integrated test circuit and the output indicator (test button) to determine that it works.

§ 131.570   Quarterly inspections.
top

(a) Each apparatus that controls a lifeboat winch, including motor controllers, emergency switches, master switches, and limit switches, must be inspected once each 3 months.

(b) The inspection must involve the removal of drain plugs and the opening of drain valves to ensure that enclosures are free of water.

(c) The date of the inspection required by this section and the condition of the equipment must be entered in the vessel's logbook.

§ 131.575   Yearly inspections and repair.
top

(a) Each lifeboat, rescue boat, rigid liferaft, buoyant apparatus, and life float must be stripped, cleaned, and thoroughly inspected and repaired as needed at least once a year. This procedure includes emptying and cleaning each fuel tank and refilling it with fresh fuel.

(b) Each davit, winch, fall, and other launching-appliance must be thoroughly inspected at least once a year, and repaired as needed.

(c) Each item of survival equipment with an expiration date must be replaced during the annual inspection and repair if this date has passed.

(d) Each battery used in an item of survival equipment and clearly marked with an expiration date must be replaced during the annual inspection and repair if this date has passed.

(e) Except a storage battery used in a lifeboat or in a rescue boat, each battery used in an item of survival equipment and not clearly marked with an expiration date must be replaced during the annual inspection and repair.

(f) Compliance with the requirements of this section does not relieve the master or person in charge of the duty of compliance with requirements in §131.540(a) of this subpart to keep the equipment ready for immediate use when the vessel is under way.

§ 131.580   Servicing of inflatable liferafts, inflatable lifejackets, inflatable buoyant apparatus, and inflated rescue boats.
top

(a) An inflatable liferaft or inflatable buoyant apparatus must be serviced at a facility specifically approved by the Commandant for the particular brand, and in accordance with servicing procedures meeting the requirements of part 160, subpart 160.151, of this chapter—

(1) No later than the month and year on its servicing sticker affixed under 46 CFR 160.151–57(n), except that servicing may be delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel, provided that the delay does not exceed 5 months; and

(2) Whenever the container is damaged or the container straps or seals are broken.

(b) Each inflatable lifejacket and hybrid inflatable lifejacket or work vest must be serviced:

(1) Within 12 months of its initial packing; and

(2) Within 12 months of each subsequent servicing, except that servicing may be delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the OSV, provided that the delay does not exceed 5 months.

(c) Each inflatable lifejacket must be serviced in compliance with subpart 160.176 of this chapter.

(d) Each hybrid inflatable lifejacket or work vest must be serviced in accordance with the manual provided under §160.077–29 of this chapter.

(e) Repair and maintenance of inflatable rescue boats must follow the manufacturers' instructions. Each repair, except an emergency repair made aboard the vessel, must be made at a servicing facility approved by the Commandant (G-MSE).

[CGD 82–004 and CGD 86–074, 62 FR 49340, Sept. 19, 1997, as amended by USCG–2002–11118, 67 FR 58541, Sept. 17, 2002]

§ 131.585   Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.
top

(a) Except a disposable hydrostatic-release unit with an expiration date, each hydrostatic-release unit must be serviced—

(1) Within 12 months of its manufacture and within 12 months of each subsequent servicing, except when a servicing due after 12 months is delayed not more than 5 months until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel; and

(2) In compliance with subpart 160.062 of this chapter.

(b) The springs of each spring-tensioned gripe used with a hydrostatic-release unit must be renewed when the unit is serviced and tested.

§ 131.590   Firefighting equipment.
top

(a) The master shall ensure that the vessel's required firefighting equipment is on board in the prescribed location and always ready for use, other than when the equipment is being serviced.

(b) The master shall, at least once each 12 months, nsure the performance of the tests and inspections of each portable fire extinguisher, semiportable fire extinguisher, and fixed fire-extinguishing system aboard described by Table 132.350 of this subchapter.

(c) The master shall keep records of these tests and inspections, showing the dates of their performance, the number or other identification of each unit undergoing them, and the name of the person or company conducting them. The records must be made available to the marine inspector upon request and must be kept for the period of validity of the vessel's current Certificate of Inspection.

(d) The conducting of tests and inspections required by this section does not relieve the master of his or her responsibility to maintain the prescribed firefighting equipment in working order for use at any time when the vessel is under way.

Subpart F—Logs
top
§ 131.610   Logbooks and records.
top

(a) Each OSV must by statute, or by regulations in this subchapter, have certain logbooks or records. The master shall make all entries required by statute, or by regulations in this subchapter.

(b) 46 U.S.C. 11301 states that a vessel of the United States, except one on a voyage from a port in the United States to a port in Canada, shall have an official logbook if the vessel is—

(1) On a voyage from a port in the United States to a foreign port; or

(2) Of at least 100 gross tons and on a voyage between a port in the United States on the Atlantic Ocean and one on the Pacific Ocean.

(c) The Coast Guard gratuitously furnishes to masters of vessels of the United States the official logbook as Form CG–706B or CG–706C, depending upon the number of persons employed as crew. The first several pages of this logbook list various acts of Congress governing logbooks and the entries required in them.

(d) When a voyage is completed, or after a specified time has elapsed, the master shall file the official logbook containing required entries with the OCMI at or nearest the port where the vessel may be.

(e) Unless an official logbook is required, the owner, operator, or master shall supply an alternative log or record for making entries required by law, including regulations in this subchapter. This log or record need not be filed with this OCMI, but must be kept available for review by a marine inspector for a year after the date that the latest entry concerns.

§ 131.620   Matters that must be logged.
top

The following matters must be entered in each vessel's logbook:

(a) Safety Orientation for Offshore Workers. As held. See §131.320.

(b) Tests and inspection of Steering Gear, Whistle, and Means of Communication. Before departure. See §131.505.

(c) Draft and Loadline Markings. Before leaving port. Ocean and coastwise voyages only. See §131.510.

(d) Verification of Compliance with Applicable Stability Requirements. See §131.513.

(e) Periodic Sanitary Inspections. After periodic sanitary inspections made by the master. See §131.515.

(f) Hatches and Other Openings. Each opening and closing, or departure from port without closing (except by vessels on protected waters). See §131.520.

(g) Tests of Emergency Lighting and Power. Weekly, monthly, and twice-yearly. See §131.525.

(h) Abandon-Ship Training and Drills, and Firefighting Training and Drills. As held. See §§131.530 and 131.535.

(i) Inspection of Lifeboat Winches. Once each 3 months. See §131.570.

§ 131.630   Entries in official logbooks.
top

On each vessel required to have an Official Logbook, the items required by 46 U.S.C. 11301, as well as the items required by §131.620, must be entered in the logbook.

Subpart G—Work Vests
top
§ 131.710   Approved work vests.
top

Each buoyant work vest carried aboard must be approved under subpart 160.053 of this chapter or, as a commercial hybrid personal flotation device, under subpart 160.077 of this chapter.

§ 131.720   Use.
top

(a) An approved buoyant work vest is an item of safety apparel and may be carried aboard for wear by a crew member when working near or over the water.

(b) The vest may not count towards the vessel's complement of lifejackets.

(c) The vest may not be worn instead of a lifejacket during a drill.

§ 131.730   Shipboard stowage.
top

The master shall ensure that no work vest is stowed where any lifejacket is stowed.

§ 131.740   Shipboard inspections.
top

Each buoyant work vest must be subject to examination by a marine inspector, to determine its serviceability. If found serviceable, it may continue in service; but no buoyant work vest is stamped as inspected. If not found serviceable, and if determined irreparable by the inspector, a buoyant work vest must be destroyed in the presence of the inspector.

Subpart H—Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment
top
§ 131.800   General.
top

(a) This section prescribes markings necessary for the guidance of persons aboard in case of an emergency. The markings may be modified or omitted if they are unnecessary, because either the vessel is small or particular circumstances warrant, and if the cognizant OCMI approves.

(b) Each stateroom notice, directional sign, and the like must be printed in English and in other languages appropriate to the service of the vessel.

(c) Where this subpart specifies red letters, letters of a contrasting color on a red background are acceptable.

§ 131.805   General alarm bell, switch.
top

The switch in the pilothouse that activates the general alarm bell must be clearly and permanently identified either by letters on a metal plate or with a sign in red letters on a suitable background that state the following: “GENERAL ALARM.”

§ 131.810   General alarm bell.
top

Each general alarm bell must be identified by red letters at least 13 millimeters (1/2-inch) high that state the following: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.”

§ 131.815   Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system.
top

Each alarm for a fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system must be conspicuously identified, using the following statement: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS, LEAVE AT ONCE: [CARBON DIOXIDE] [HALON] BEING RELEASED.”

§ 131.820   Branch lines of fire-extinguishing system.
top

The valves of each branch line in the fire extinguishing system must be plainly and permanently marked, indicating the spaces served.

§ 131.825   Controls of fire-extinguishing system.
top

Each control cabinet or space containing a valve or manifold for a fire extinguishing system must be distinctly marked in conspicuous red letters at least 50 millimeters (2 inches) high that state the following: “FIRE APPARATUS FOR [CARBON DIOXIDE] [HALON]”.

§ 131.830   Fire-hose stations.
top

Each fire station must be identified in red letters and figures at least 50 millimeters (2 inches) high that state the following: “FIRE STATION #1,” “ *  *  * 2,” “ *  *  * 3,” and so on. Where the hose is not so stowed in the open or behind glass as to be readily seen, this identification must be so placed as to be readily seen from a distance.

§ 131.835   Portable fire extinguishers.
top

(a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, ach portable fire extinguisher must be marked with a number, and the site of its stowage must be marked with a corresponding number at least 13 millimeters (1/2-inch) high.

(b) If only one type and size of portable fire extinguisher is carried, the number may be omitted.

§ 131.840   Emergency lighting.
top

Emergency lighting must be marked with a letter “E” at least 13 millimeters (1/2-inch) high.

§ 131.845   Instructions for shift of steering gear.
top

(a) Instructions, including diagrams, for a shift of steering gear and for a shift to the alternative steering stations must be on water-resistant material and posted at each steering station and in the steering-engine room, relating, in order, the different steps to take in either shift.

(b) The instructions must indicate each clutch or pin to be “in” or “out” and each valve or switch to be “open” or “closed” in a shift to any means of steering for which the vessel is equipped.

(c) The instructions must specify that each steering wheel or lever, and each rudder, must be amidships before any shift of steering gear or steering stations.

(d) Each clutch, gear, wheel, lever, valve, or switch used during any shift of steering gear or steering stations must be numbered or lettered on a metal plate or painted so that the numbers or letters are recognizable at a reasonable distance.

§ 131.850   Rudder orders.
top

At each steering station there must be installed a suitable notice on the wheel or lever, or in some other place directly in the helmsman's line of sight, to indicate the direction in which to turn the wheel or lever for “right rudder” and for “left rudder.”

§ 131.855   Lifeboats and rescue boats.
top

(a) The following must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of each lifeboat and rescue boat in block capital letters and numbers:

(1) The name of the vessel.

(2) The number of the boat. (The boats on each side of the vessel must be numbered from forward to aft. If there are boats on both sides of the vessel, the odd numbers must be on the starboard side.)

(3) For each vessel in ocean service, the name of the port whose marking on the stern is required by §67.123 of this chapter.

(b) The following must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of each lifeboat and rescue boat in block capital letters and numbers:

(1) The length and beam of the boat.

(2) The number of persons the boat will hold. This number must—

(i) Be the number of persons the boat is equipped for; and

(ii) Not be greater than the number of persons the boat is approved for, as shown on its nameplate.

(c) The following must be plainly marked or painted on each lifeboat and rescue boat, visible from above the boat:

(1) The number of the boat.

(2) The name of the vessel.

(d) Each lifeboat and rescue boat must be marked with Type II retro-reflective material approved under subpart 164.018 of this chapter. The arrangement of the retro-reflective material must comply with IMO Resolution A.658(16).

§ 131.860   Rigid liferafts.
top

(a) The following must be plainly marked or painted, near one entrance of each rigid liferaft:

(1) The name of the vessel.

(2) For each vessel in ocean service, the name of the port whose marking on the stern is required by §67.123 of this chapter.

(b) The length of the painter must be plainly marked or painted, near one entrance of each rigid liferaft.

(c) The number of persons the rigid liferaft is approved for must be plainly marked or painted, over each entrance to each raft, in letters and numbers at least 102 millimeters (4 inches) high and in a color contrasting to that of the raft. This number must—

(1) Be the number of persons the rigid liferaft is equipped for; and

(2) Not be greater than the number of persons the rigid liferaft is approved for, as shown on its nameplate.

(d) The rigid liferaft must be marked with the words “SOLAS A pack” or “SOLAS B pack”, to reflect the pack inside.

§ 131.865   Inflatable liferafts and inflatable buoyant apparatus.
top

The number of the inflatable liferaft or inflatable buoyant apparatus and the number of persons it is approved for must be marked or painted, in a conspicuous place in the immediate vicinity of each raft and each apparatus, in letters and numbers at least 38 millimeters (1–1/2inches) high and in a color contrasting to that of the raft or apparatus. Each raft or apparatus stowed on the side of a vessel must be numbered like a liferaft in compliance with §199.178 (c) and (d) of this chapter. No letters or numbers may go on the liferaft or on the container of the apparatus.

§ 131.870   Life floats and buoyant apparatus.
top

(a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant apparatus, and on each oar and paddle.

(b) The number of persons each life float or buoyant apparatus is approved for must be plainly marked or painted on each float or apparatus in letters and numbers at least 38 millimeters (1–1/2inches) high and in a color contrasting to that of the float or apparatus. This number must—

(1) Be the number of persons the float or apparatus is equipped for; and

(2) Not be greater than the number of persons the float or apparatus is approved for, as shown on its nameplate.

§ 131.875   Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.
top

(a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked in block capital letters with the vessel's name.

(b) Each container for lifejackets and immersion suits must be marked in letters and numbers at least 50 millimeters (2 inches) high with the number, identity, or IMO symbol specified by IMO Resolution A.760(18), and size of the items stowed inside.

(c) Each ring buoy on a vessel in ocean service must be marked in block capital letters with the name of the port whose marking on the stern of the vessel is required by §67.123 of this chapter.

(d) Each stowage site for a ring buoy must be marked “LIFE BUOY” or marked with the IMO symbol.

(e) Each lifejacket must be marked with Type I retro-reflective material approved under subpart 164.018 of this chapter. The arrangement of the retro-reflective material must comply with IMO Resolution A.658(16).

(f) Each ring life buoy must be marked with Type I or II retro-reflective material approved under subpart 164.018 of this chapter. The arrangement of the retro-reflective material must comply with IMO Resolution A.658(16).

§ 131.880   Fire hoses and axes.
top

Each fire hose and axe must be marked with the vessel's name.

§ 131.890   EPIRBs and SARTs.
top

The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) and on each Search and Rescue Transponder (SART), except on an EPIRB or SART—

(a) In an inflatable liferaft; or

(b) Permanently installed in a survival craft.

§ 131.893   Watertight doors and watertight hatches.
top

Each watertight door in a bulkhead that must be watertight in compliance with the requirements in part 174 of this chapter, and each watertight hatch, must be marked on both sides in letters at least 50 millimeters (2 inches) high that state the following: “WATERTIGHT DOOR—KEEP CLOSED EXCEPT FOR PASSAGE” or “WATERTIGHT HATCH—KEEP CLOSED WHEN NOT IN USE”.

§ 131.896   Remote stopping-systems.
top

The remote stopping-systems required by §129.540 of this subchapter must be clearly marked to show what system each controls.

§ 131.899   Fire dampers.
top

Each fire damper installed within the boundary of a space protected by a fixed fire extinguishing system must be fitted with an indicator showing whether the damper is open or closed and must be marked with red letters at least 13 millimeters (1/2-inch) high stating “FIRE DAMPER” and, as otherwise appropriate, identifying the space served by the fire damper.

Subpart I—Miscellaneous
top
§ 131.905   Statutory penalties.
top

(a) The marine-safety statutes and other statutes impose criminal and civil penalties for violating the applicable provisions of this subchapter. Possible sanctions include:

(1) Assessment and collection of civil monetary penalty.

(2) Criminal prosecution, where no loss of life results.

(3) Criminal prosecution for manslaughter, where loss of life results from violating marine-safety statutes or regulations or from misconduct, negligence, or inattention to duty.

(4) Libel against vessel.

(b) 46 U.S.C. Chapter 77 allows, in addition to the foregoing, the suspension or revocation of licenses, certificates, or documents issued by the Coast Guard, for incompetence, misconduct, or negligence or for violating marine-safety statutes or regulations.

§ 131.910   Notices to mariners and aids to navigation.
top

Each master and mate shall acquaint himself or herself with the latest information published by the Coast Guard and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency regarding aids to navigation in the area in which the vessel operates.

[CGD 82–004 and CGD 86–074, 62 FR 49340, Sept. 19, 1997, as amended by USCG–2001–10224, 66 FR 48620, Sept. 21, 2001]

§ 131.915   Persons allowed in pilothouse and on navigational bridge.
top

No person may be in the pilothouse while the vessel is under way, unless connected with the navigation of the vessel or authorized for good cause by the master or mate on watch.

§ 131.920   Level of manning.
top

Each vessel must carry the personnel required by the Certificate of Inspection, as determined by the cognizant OCMI, based on an evaluation under part 15 of this chapter.

§ 131.925   Compliance with provisions of Certificate of Inspection.
top

The master of the vessel shall ensure compliance with each provision of the Certificate of Inspection. Nothing in this subchapter prevents the master's diverting the vessel from the route prescribed in the Certificate, or taking other steps necessary and prudent to assist vessels in distress or to handle similar emergencies.

§ 131.930   Display of stability letter.
top

If the Coast Guard issues a stability letter under §170.120 of this chapter, the letter must be readily available to the person on watch in the pilothouse of the vessel.

§ 131.935   Prevention of oil pollution.
top

Each vessel must be operated in compliance with—

(a) Section 311 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1321); and

(b) 33 CFR parts 151, 155, and 156.

§ 131.940   Marine sanitation device.
top

Each vessel with installed toilet facilities must have a marine sanitation device in compliance with 33 CFR part 159.

§ 131.945   Display of plans.
top

Each vessel must have a permanently exhibited, for the guidance of the master and crew members, general arrangement plans showing, for each deck, the various fire-retardant bulkheads together with particulars of the—

(a) Fire-detection systems;

(b) Manual-alarm systems;

(c) Fire-extinguishing systems;

(d) Fire doors;

(e) Means of ingress to the different compartments; and

(f) Ventilating-systems, including the—

(1) Positions of the dampers;

(2) Site of the remote means of stopping the fans; and

(3) Identification of the fans serving each section.

§ 131.950   Placard on lifesaving signals and helicopter recovery.
top

(a) Each vessel must have readily available to the person on watch in the pilothouse a placard (Form CG–811) containing instructions—

(1) For the use of lifesaving signals set forth in Regulation 16, Chapter V, of SOLAS 74/83; and

(2) In helicopter recovery.

(b) The signals must be employed by vessels or persons in distress when communicating with lifesaving stations and maritime rescue units.

§ 131.955   Display of license.
top

Each master and licensed officer on a vessel shall conspicuously display his or her license in compliance with 46 U.S.C. 7110.

§ 131.960   Use of auto-pilot.
top

When the automatic pilot is used in areas of high traffic density, conditions of restricted visibility, or any other hazardous navigational situations, the master shall ensure that—

(a) It is possible to immediately establish manual control of the vessel's steering;

(b) A competent person is ready at all times to take over steering control; and

(c) The changeover from automatic to manual control of the vessel's steering and the reverse is made by, or under the supervision of, the master or officer of the watch.

§ 131.965   Sounding of whistle.
top

No vessel may sound its whistle within any harbor limits of the United States unless it needs to.

§ 131.970   Unauthorized lighting.
top

No master of a vessel may authorize or permit the vessel's carrying of any lighting not required by law that will interfere in any way with any other vessel's ability to distinguish the vessel's navigation lighting.

§ 131.975   Searchlights.
top

No person may flash, or cause to be flashed, the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light onto the bridge or into the pilothouse of any vessel, OSV or other, under way.

§ 131.980   Lookouts and watches.
top

Nothing in this part exonerates any master or officer of the watch from the consequences of any neglect to keep a proper lookout or to maintain a proper fire watch, or of any neglect of any precaution that may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen, by general prudence, or by the special circumstances of the case. Each master shall set added watches when necessary to guard against fire or other danger and to give an alarm in case of accident or disaster.

Browse Previous | Browse Next