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e-CFR Data is current as of October 17, 2008


Title 46: Shipping

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PART 133—LIFESAVING SYSTEMS

Section Contents

Subpart A—General

§ 133.03   Relationship to international standards.
§ 133.07   Additional equipment and requirements.
§ 133.09   Equivalents.
§ 133.10   Applicability.
§ 133.20   Exemptions.
§ 133.40   Evaluation, testing and approval of lifesaving appliances and arrangements.
§ 133.45   Tests and inspections of lifesaving equipment and arrangements.

Subpart B—Requirements for All OSVs

§ 133.60   Communications.
§ 133.70   Personal lifesaving appliances.
§ 133.80   Emergency instructions.
§ 133.90   Operating instructions.
§ 133.105   Survival craft.
§ 133.110   Survival craft muster and embarkation arrangements.
§ 133.120   Launching stations.
§ 133.130   Stowage of survival craft.
§ 133.135   Rescue boats.
§ 133.140   Stowage of rescue boats.
§ 133.145   Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.
§ 133.150   Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements: General.
§ 133.153   Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements using falls and a winch.
§ 133.160   Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.
§ 133.170   Line-throwing appliance.
§ 133.175   Survival craft and rescue boat equipment.


Authority:   46 U.S.C. 3306, 3307; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1.

Source:   CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General
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§ 133.03   Relationship to international standards.
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This subpart and subpart B of this part are based on Chapter III, SOLAS. Section numbers in this subpart and subpart B of this part are generally related to the regulation numbers in Chapter III, SOLAS, but paragraph designations are not related to the numbering in Chapter III, SOLAS. To find the corresponding Chapter III, SOLAS regulation for this subpart and subpart B of this part, beginning with §133.10, divide the section number following the decimal point by 10.

§ 133.07   Additional equipment and requirements.
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The OCMI may require an OSV to carry specialized or additional lifesaving equipment other than as required in this part if the OCMI determines that the conditions of a voyage present uniquely hazardous circumstances which are not adequately addressed by existing requirements.

§ 133.09   Equivalents.
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When this part requires a particular fitting, material, or lifesaving appliance or arrangement, the Commandant (G-MSE) may accept any other fitting, material, or lifesaving appliance or arrangement that is at least as effective as that required by this part. The Commandant may require engineering evaluations and tests to determine the equivalent effectiveness of the substitute fitting, material, or lifesaving appliance or arrangement.

§ 133.10   Applicability.
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(a) Unless expressly provided otherwise in this part, this part applies to all inspected OSVs of the United States flag, including liftboats.

(b) Offshore supply vessels which were constructed prior to October 1, 1996, must—

(1) By October 1, 1997, meet the requirements of §§133.60(a), 133.80, and 133.90;

(2) By October 1, 1997, fit retro-reflective material on all floating appliances, lifejackets, and immersion suits; and

(3) Offshore supply vessels may retain the arrangement of lifeboats, lifeboat davits, winches, inflatable liferafts, liferaft launching equipment, rescue boats, lifefloats, and buoyant apparatus previously required and approved for the OSV, as long as the arrangement or appliance is maintained in good condition to the satisfaction of the OCMI.

(c) When any lifesaving appliance or arrangement on an OSV subject to this part is replaced, or when the OSV undergoes repairs, alterations, or modifications of a major character involving replacement of, or any addition to, the existing lifesaving appliances or arrangements, each new lifesaving appliance and arrangement must meet the requirements of this part, unless the OCMI determines that the OSV cannot accommodate the new appliance or arrangement.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996; 61 FR 40281, Aug. 1, 1996]

§ 133.20   Exemptions.
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(a) If a District Commander determines that the overall safety of the persons on board an OSV will not be significantly reduced, the District Commander may grant an exemption from compliance with a provision of this part to a specific OSV for a specified geographic area within the boundaries of the Coast Guard District. This exemption may be limited to certain periods of the year.

(b) Requests for exemption under this section must be in writing to the OCMI for transmission to the District Commander in the area in which the OSV is in service or will be in service.

(c) If the exemption is granted by the District Commander, the OCMI will endorse the OSV's Certificate of Inspection with a statement describing the exemption.

§ 133.40   Evaluation, testing and approval of lifesaving appliances and arrangements.
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(a) Each item of lifesaving equipment required by this part to be carried on board the OSV must be approved.

(b) Each item of lifesaving equipment carried on board the OSV in addition to those required by this part must—

(1) Be approved; or

(2) Be accepted by the cognizant OCMI for use on the OSV.

(c) The Commandant (G-MSE) may accept a novel lifesaving appliance or arrangement if it provides a level of safety equivalent the requirements of this part and if the appliance or arrangement—

(1) Is evaluated and tested in accordance with IMO Resolution A.520(13), Code of Practice for the Evaluation, Testing and Acceptance of Prototype Novel Life-saving Appliances and Arrangements; or

(2) Has successfully undergone evaluation and tests that are substantially equivalent to those recommendations.

(d) During an OSV's construction, and when any modification to the lifesaving arrangement is done after construction, a OSV owner must obtain acceptance of lifesaving arrangements from the Commandant (G-MSC).

(e) The OCMI may accept substitute lifesaving appliances other than those required by this part, except for—

(1) Survival craft and rescue boats; and

(2) Survival craft and rescue boat launching and embarkation appliances.

(f) Acceptance of lifesaving appliances and arrangements will remain in effect unless—

(1) The OCMI deems their condition to be unsatisfactory or unfit for the service intended; or

(2) The OCMI deems the crew's ability to use and assist others in the use of the lifesaving appliances or arrangements to be inadequate.

§ 133.45   Tests and inspections of lifesaving equipment and arrangements.
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(a) Initial inspection. The initial inspection of lifesaving appliances and arrangements for certification includes a demonstration of—

(1) The proper condition and operation of the survival craft and rescue boat launching appliances at loads ranging from light load to 10 percent overload;

(2) The proper condition and operation of rescue boats, including engines and release mechanisms;

(3) The proper condition of flotation equipment such as lifebuoys, lifejackets, immersion suits, work vests, lifefloats, buoyant apparatus, and associated equipment;

(4) The proper condition of distress signaling equipment, including EPIRB and pyrotechnic signaling devices;

(5) The proper condition of line-throwing appliances;

(6) The proper condition and operation of embarkation appliances, including embarkation ladders and marine evacuation systems;

(7) The ability of the crew to effectively carry out abandon-ship procedures; and

(8) The ability to meet the egress and survival craft launching requirements of this part.

(b) Reinspections. Tests and inspections of lifesaving equipment shall be carried out during each inspection for renewal of certification and periodic inspection, and shall demonstrate, as applicable,—

(1) The proper condition and operation of the survival craft and rescue boat launching appliances at loads ranging from light load to full load;

(2) The proper condition and operation of rescue boats including engines and release mechanisms;

(3) The proper condition of flotation equipment such as lifebuoys, lifejackets, immersion suits, work vests, lifefloats, buoyant apparatus, and associated equipment;

(4) That each inflatable liferaft and inflatable lifejacket has been serviced as required under this chapter;

(5) That each hydrostatic release unit, other than a disposable hydrostatic release unit, has been serviced as required under this chapter; and

(6) That the crew has the ability to effectively carry out abandon-ship procedures.

(c) Other inspections. Lifesaving appliances and arrangements are subject to tests and inspections described in paragraph (b) of this section during OSV boardings to ensure that the appliances and arrangements comply with applicable requirements, are in satisfactory condition, and remain fit for service.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996, as amended by USCG 1999–4976, 65 FR 6507, Feb. 9, 2000]

Subpart B—Requirements for All OSVs
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§ 133.60   Communications.
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(a) Emergency position indicating radiobeacons (EPIRB). (1) Each OSV must carry a category 1 406 MHz satellite EPIRB meeting the requirements of 47 CFR part 80.

(2) When the OSV is underway, the EPIRB must be stowed in its float-free bracket with the controls set for automatic activation and mounted in a manner so that it will float free if the OSV sinks.

(3) Each EPIRB should have the name of the OSV plainly marked or painted on its label, except for EPIRBs in an inflatable liferaft or permanently installed in a survival craft.

(b) Distress flares. Each OSV must—

(1) Carry not less than 12 rocket parachute flares approved under approval series 160.136; and

(2) Stow the flares on or near the OSV's navigating bridge.

(c) Onboard communications and alarm systems. Each OSV must meet the requirements for onboard communications between emergency control stations, muster and embarkation stations, and strategic positions on board, and the emergency alarm system requirements in part J of this chapter, and be supplemented by either a public address system or other suitable means of communication.

(d) Emergency position indicating radiobeacon alternative. OSVs, as an alternative to the requirements in paragraph (a) of this section, may until February 1, 1999, have a Coast Guard-approved class A EPIRB, if the EPIRB was—

(1) Manufactured after October 1, 1988; and

(2) Installed on the OSV on or before July 5, 1996.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996, as amended by USCG 1998–4442, 63 FR 52191, Sept. 30, 1998]

§ 133.70   Personal lifesaving appliances.
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(a) Lifebuoys. Each OSV must carry lifebuoys approved under approval series 160.150 or 160.050 as follows:

(1) Number. The number of lifebuoys carried must be as prescribed in table 133.70 of this section.

Table 133.70

Length of vessel in meters
(feet)
Minimum number of ring lifebuoys
Ocean serviceCoastwise service
Under 30 (98)83
30 (98) and under 60 (196)84
60 (196) and under 100 (328)86
100 (328) and over1212

(2) Stowage. Lifebuoys must be stowed as follows:

(i) Each lifebuoy must be capable of being rapidly cast loose.

(ii) Each lifebuoy must not be permanently secured to the OSV in any way.

(iii) Each lifebuoy stowage position must be marked with either the words “LIFEBUOY” or “LIFE BUOY”, or with the appropriate symbol from IMO Resolution A.760(18).

(iv) Lifebuoys must be so distributed as to be readily available on each side of the OSV and, as far as practicable, on each open deck extending to the side of the OSV. At least one lifebuoy must be located near the stern of the OSV. The lifebuoys with attached self-igniting lights must be equally distributed on both sides of the OSV.

(3) Color and markings. Lifebuoys must be colored and marked as follows:

(i) Each lifebuoy must be orange.

(ii) Each lifebuoy must be marked in block capital letters with the name of the OSV and the name of the port required to be marked on the stern of the OSV under subpart 67.123 of this chapter.

(4) Attachments and fittings. Lifebuoys must have the following attachments and fittings:

(i) At least one lifebuoy on each side of the OSV fitted with a buoyant lifeline that is—

(A) At least as long as twice the height where it is stowed above the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition, or 30 meters (100 feet), whichever is the greater;

(B) Non-kinking;

(C) Not less than 8 millimeters (5/16inch) in diameter;

(D) Of a breaking strength which is not less than 5 kiloNewtons (1,124 pounds-force); and

(E) Resistant to deterioration from ultraviolent light. Line that is certified by the manufacturer or is synthetic and a dark color meets this requirement.

(ii) Except for an OSV in coastwise service and under 30 meters (99 feet) in length, at least one-half the total number of lifebuoys, but not less than two, must each be fitted with a self-igniting light approved under approval series 161.010. The self-igniting light must not be attached to the lifebuoys required by this section to be fitted with lifelines. However, if the OSV carries less than four lifebuoys, a buoyant lifeline can be fitted to one of the lifebuoys with a self-igniting light.

(b) Lifejackets. Each OSV must carry lifejackets approved under approval series 160.002, 160.005, 160.055, 160.077, 160.155, 160.176, or 160.177. If the OSV carries inflatable lifejackets, they must be of the same or similar design and have the same method of operation.

(1) General. Each OSV must carry a lifejacket for each person on board and in addition, a sufficient number of lifejackets must be carried for persons on watch and for use at remotely located survival craft stations.

(2) Stowage. Lifejackets must be stowed as follows:

(i) The lifejackets must be readily accessible.

(ii) The lifejacket stowage positions must be marked with either the word “LIFEJACKETS” or with the appropriate symbol from IMO Resolution A.760(18).

(iii) The additional lifejackets required by paragraph (b)(1) of this section must be stowed on the bridge, in the engine control room, and at other manned watch stations.

(3) Markings. Each lifejacket must be marked—

(i) In block capital letters with the name of the OSV; and.

(ii) With type I retro-reflective material approved under approval series 164.018. The arrangement of the retro-reflective material must meet IMO Resolution A.658(16).

(4) Lifejacket lights. Each lifejacket must have a lifejacket light approved under approval series 161.112 or 161.012 securely attached to the front shoulder area of the lifejacket. However, lifejacket lights bearing Coast Guard approval number 161.012/2/1 are not permitted on OSVs certificated to operate on waters where water temperature may drop below 10° C (50° F).

(c) Immersion suits or anti-exposure suits. Immersion suits must be approved under approval series 160.171, and anti-exposure suits must be approved under approval series 160.153.

(1) General. Each OSV, except OSVs operating in the Gulf of Mexico or on other routes between 32 degrees north latitude and 32 degrees south latitude, must carry—

(i) An immersion suit or anti-exposure suit of suitable size for each person assigned to the rescue boat crew; and

(ii) An immersion suit of the appropriate size for each person on board. The immersion suits required under this paragraph count toward meeting the requirements of paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section.

(2) Stowage. Immersion suits and anti-exposure suits must be stowed as follows:

(i) Immersion suits and anti-exposure suits must be stowed so they are readily accessible, and the stowage positions must be marked with the words “IMMERSION SUITS” or “ANTI-EXPOSURE SUITS” as appropriate, or with the appropriate symbol from IMO Resolution A.760(18).

(ii) If watch stations, work stations, or work sites are remote from cabins, staterooms, or berthing areas and the immersion suits are stowed in those locations, there must be, in addition to the immersion suits required under paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section, enough immersion suits stowed at the watch stations, work stations, or work sites to equal the number of persons normally on watch in, or assigned to, those locations at any time.

(3) Markings. Each immersion suit or anti-exposure suit must be marked in such a way as to identify the person or OSV to which it belongs.

(4) Lights for immersion suits or anti-exposure suits. Each immersion suit or anti-exposure suit must have a lifejacket light approved under approval series 161.112 or 161.012 securely attached to the front shoulder area of the immersion suit or anti-exposure suit. However, lifejacket lights bearing Coast Guard approval number 161.012/2/1 are not permitted on OSVs certificated to operate on waters where water temperature may drop below 10° C (50° F).

(d) Lifejacket, immersion suit, and anti-exposure suit containers. Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and anti-exposure suit container must be marked in block capital letters and numbers with the quantity, identity, and size of the equipment stowed inside the container. The equipment may be identified in words, or with the appropriate symbol from IMO Resolution A.760(18).

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996; 61 FR 40281, Aug. 1, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52816, Oct. 1, 1998]

§ 133.80   Emergency instructions.
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(a) General. Copies of clear instructions must be provided on the OSV, detailing the actions that each person on board should follow in the event of an emergency.

(b) Emergency instructions. Illustrations and instructions in English and any other appropriate language, as determined by the OCMI, must be conspicuously displayed at each muster station and in spaces where offshore workers are carried, to inform offshore workers of—

(1) The fire and emergency signal;

(2) Their muster station;

(3) The essential actions they must take in an emergency;

(4) The location of lifejackets; and

(5) The method of donning lifejackets.

§ 133.90   Operating instructions.
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Each OSV must have posters or signs displayed in the vicinity of each survival craft and the survival craft's launching controls that—

(a) Illustrate the purpose of controls;

(b) Illustrate the procedures for operating the launching device;

(c) Give relevant instructions or warnings;

(d) Can be easily seen under emergency lighting conditions; and

(e) Display symbols in accordance with IMO Resolution A.760(18).

§ 133.105   Survival craft.
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(a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as follows:

(1) Each inflatable liferaft—

(i) On an OSV on an unlimited oceans route, must be approved under approval series 160.151 and be equipped with a SOLAS A pack;

(ii) On an OSV on an oceans route limited to within 50 nautical miles of the shore, must be approved under approval series 160.151 and be equipped with either a SOLAS A pack or SOLAS B pack; and

(iii) On an OSV on a coastwise route, must be approved under approval series 160.051 or 160.151, with any approved equipment pack.

(2) Each rigid liferaft must be approved under approval series 160.118 and be equipped as specified in table 133.175 of this part.

(3) Each inflatable buoyant apparatus must be approved under approval series 160.010.

(4) Each lifefloat must be approved under approval series 160.027 and be equipped with the following:

(i) One boathook.

(ii) Two paddles. Each paddle must be at least 1.2 meters (4 feet) long and buoyant.

(iii) One painter. The painter must—

(A) Be at least 30 meters (100 feet) long, but not less than three times the distance between the deck where the lifefloats are stowed and to the OSV's waterline in the lightest seagoing condition;

(B) Have a breaking strength of at least 6.7 kiloNewtons (1,500 pounds-force), except that if the capacity of the lifefloat is 50 persons or more, the breaking strength must be at least 13.4 kiloNewtons (3,000 pounds-force);

(C) If made of a synthetic material, be dark in color or certified by the manufacturer to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light;

(D) Be stowed in such a way that it runs out freely when the buoyant apparatus, inflatable buoyant apparatus, or lifefloat floats away from the sinking OSV; and

(E) Have a float-free link meeting the requirements of part 160, subpart 160.073 of this chapter, connecting the painter to the OSV.

(iv) One self-igniting light. The self-igniting light must be approved under approval series 161.010, and must be attached to the buoyant apparatus, inflatable buoyant apparatus, or lifefloat by a 12-thread manila or equivalent lanyard, at least 5.5 meters (18 feet) long. The self-igniting light is not required on a lifefloat with a capacity of 24 persons or less.

(5) Each marine evacuation system must be approved under approval series 160.175.

(6) Lifeboats may be substituted for liferafts. If lifeboats are installed on an OSV, their installation and arrangement must meet the applicable requirements of subchapter W of this chapter.

(b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, OSVs must carry one or more liferafts with an aggregate capacity that will accommodate the total number of persons on board. The liferafts must be—

(1) Stowed in a position providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open deck level; or

(2) Additional liferafts must be provided to bring the total capacity available on each side to at least 100 percent of the total number of persons on board. If additional liferafts are provided and the rescue boat required under §133.135 is also a lifeboat, it may be included in the aggregate capacity requirement.

(c) Each OSV operating in the Gulf of Mexico, as an alternative to the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section, may carry a sufficient number of inflatable buoyant apparatus or a sufficient number of lifefloats, having an aggregate capacity that, together with any lifeboats, rescue boats, and liferafts, will accommodate the total number of persons on board.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996; 61 FR 40281, Aug. 1, 1996]

§ 133.110   Survival craft muster and embarkation arrangements.
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(a) Each OSV must have muster stations that—

(1) Are near the embarkation stations, unless the muster station is the embarkation station;

(2) Permit ready access for the offshore workers to the embarkation station, unless the muster station is the embarkation station; and

(3) Have sufficient room to marshal and instruct the offshore workers.

(b) Each muster station must have sufficient space to accommodate all persons assigned to muster at that station. One or more muster stations must be close to each embarkation station.

(c) Each muster station and embarkation station must be readily accessible to accommodation and work areas.

(d) Each muster station and embarkation station must be adequately illuminated by lighting supplied from the emergency source of electrical power.

(e) Each davit-launched survival craft muster station and embarkation station must be arranged to enable stretcher cases to be placed in the survival craft.

(f) Each launching station or each two adjacent launching stations with an embarkation position more than 3 meters (10 feet) above the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition, must have an embarkation ladder as follows:

(1) Each embarkation ladder must be approved under approval series 160.117 or approval series 160.017.

(2) Each embarkation ladder must extend in a single length, from the deck to the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition under unfavorable conditions of trim and with the OSV listed not less than 15 degrees either way.

(3) Each embarkation ladder may be replaced by a device approved to provide safe and rapid access to survival craft in the water, if the OCMI permits the device, provided that there is at least one embarkation ladder on each side of the OSV.

(g) Each davit-launched liferaft must be arranged to be boarded and launched from a position immediately adjacent to the stowed position or from a position to where, under §133.130, the liferaft is transferred before launching.

(h) If a davit-launched survival craft is embarked over the edge of the deck, the craft must be provide with a means for bringing it against the side of the OSV and holding it alongside the OSV to allow persons to safely embark.

(i) If a davit-launched survival craft or rescue boat is not intended to be moved to the stowed position with persons on board, the craft must be provided with a means for bringing it against the side of the OSV and holding it alongside the OSV to allow persons to safely disembark after a drill.

§ 133.120   Launching stations.
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(a) Each launching station must be positioned to ensure safe launching with clearance from—

(1) The propeller; and

(2) The steeply overhanging portions of the hull.

(b) Each survival craft must be launched down the straight side of the OSV.

(c) Each launching station in the forward part of the OSV must—

(1) Be located aft of the collision bulkhead in a sheltered position; and

(2) Have a launching appliance approved as being of sufficient strength for forward installation.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996; 61 FR 40281, Aug. 1, 1996]

§ 133.130   Stowage of survival craft.
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(a) General. Each survival craft must be stowed as follows:

(1) Each survival craft must be as close to the accommodation and service spaces as possible.

(2) Each survival craft must be stowed in a way that neither the survival craft nor its stowage arrangements will interfere with the embarkation and operation of any other survival craft or rescue boat at any other launching station.

(3) Each survival craft must be as near the water surface as is safe and practicable.

(4) Other than liferafts intended for throw-overboard launching, each survival craft must be not less than 2 meters above the waterline with the OSV—

(i) In the fully loaded condition;

(ii) Under unfavorable conditions of trim; and

(iii) Listed up to 20 degrees either way, or to the angle where the OSV's weatherdeck edge becomes submerged, whichever is less.

(5) Each survival craft must be sufficiently ready for use so that two crew members can complete preparations for embarkation and launching in less than 5 minutes.

(6) Each survival craft must be fully equipped as required under this part.

(7) Each survival craft must be in a secure and sheltered position and protected from damage by fire and explosion, as far as practicable.

(8) Each survival craft must not require lifting from its stowed position in order to launch, except that—

(i) A davit-launched liferaft may be lifted by a manually powered winch from its stowed position to its embarkation position; or

(ii) A survival craft that weights 185 kilograms (407.8 pounds) or less, may require lifting of not more than 300 millimeters (1 foot).

(b) Additional liferaft stowage requirements. In addition to meeting the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, each liferaft must be stowed as follows:

(1) Each liferaft must be stowed to permit manual release from its securing arrangements.

(2) Each liferaft must be stowed at a height above the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition not greater than the maximum stowage height indicated on the liferaft container. Each liferaft without an indicated maximum stowage height must be stowed not more than 18 meters (59 feet) above the waterline in the OSV's lightest seagoing condition.

(3) Each liferaft must be arranged to permit it to drop into the water from the deck on which it is stowed. A liferaft stowage arrangement meets this requirement if it—

(i) Is outboard of the rail or bulwark;

(ii) Is on stanchions or on a platform adjacent to the rail or bulwark; or

(iii) Has a gate or other suitable opening to allow the liferaft to be pushed directly overboard and—

(A) Each gate or opening must be large enough to allow the liferaft to be pushed overboard; and

(B) If the liferaft is intended to be available for use on either side of the OSV, a gate or opening must be provided on each side.

(4) Each davit-launched liferaft must be stowed within reach of its lifting hook, unless some means of transfer is provided that is not rendered inoperable—

(i) Within the limits of trim and list and list specified in paragraph (a)(4)(iii) of this section;

(ii) By OSV motion; or

(iii) By power failure.

(5) Each rigid container for an inflatable liferaft to be launched by a launching appliance must be secured in a way that the container or parts of it are prevented from falling into the water during and after inflation and launching of the contained liferaft.

(6) Each liferaft must have a painter system providing a connection between the OSV and the liferaft.

(7) Each liferaft or group of liferafts must be arranged for float-free launching. The arrangement must ensure that the liferaft or liferafts when released and inflated, are not dragged under by the sinking OSV. A hydrostatic release unit used in a float-free arrangement must be approved under approval series 160.162.

(c) Additional lifefloat stowage requirements. Each lifefloat must be capable of float-free launching and be arranged as follows:

(1) Lifefloats must be secured to the OSV by—

(i) A hydrostatic release unit approved under approval series 160.062 or 160.162 and that is appropriate for the size and number of the lifefloats attached to them; or

(ii) Lashings that can be easily slipped.

(2) A painter must be secured to the lifefloat by—

(i) The attachment fitting provided by the manufacturer; or

(ii) A wire or line that encircles the body of the lifefloat and will not slip off, and meets the requirements of §133.105(a)(4)(iii).

(3) If lifefloats are arranged in groups with each group secured by a single painter,—

(i) The combined weight of each group must not exceed 185 kilograms (407.8 pounds);

(ii) Each lifefloat must be individually attached to the group's single painter by its own painter which must be long enough to allow floating without contact with any other lifefloat in the group;

(iii) The strength of the float-free link and the strength of the group's single painter must be appropriate for the combined capacity of the group of lifefloats;

(iv) The group of lifefloats must not be stowed in more than four tiers. When stowed in tiers, the separate units must be kept apart by spacers; and

(v) The group of lifefloats must be stowed to prevent shifting with easily detached lashings.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52816, Oct. 1, 1998]

§ 133.135   Rescue boats.
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(a) Each OSV must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.056 and equipped as specified in table 133.175 of this part.

(b) Offshore supply vessels, as an alternative to the requirement in paragraph (a) of this section, may carry a motor-propelled workboat or a launch if the workboat or launch must meet the embarkation, launching, and recovery arrangement requirements in §133.160(a), (c), (d), (e), and (f).

(c) A rescue boat is not required for a vessel operating on the continental shelf of the United States, if—

(1) The OCMI determines the vessel is arranged to allow a helpless person to be recovered from the water;

(2) The recovery of the helpless person can be observed from the navigating bridge; and

(3) The vessel does not regularly engage in operations that restrict its maneuverability.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996, as amended by USCG–2000–7790, 65 FR 58463, Sept. 29, 2000]

§ 133.140   Stowage of rescue boats.
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(a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows:

(1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes.

(2) Each rescue boat must be in a position suitable for launching and recovery.

(3) Each rescue boat must be stowed in a way that neither the rescue boat nor its stowage arrangements will interfere with the operation of any survival craft at any other launching station.

(b) Each rescue boat must be provided a means for recharging the rescue boat batteries from the OSV's power supply at a supply voltage not exceeding 50 volts.

(c) Each inflated rescue boat must be kept fully inflated at all times.

§ 133.145   Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.
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(a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements:

(1) Each marine evacuation system must be capable of being deployed by one person.

(2) Each marine evacuation system must enable the total number of persons for which it is designed, to be transferred from the OSV into the inflated liferafts within a period of 10 minutes from the time an abandon-ship signal is given.

(3) Each marine evacuation system must be arranged so that liferafts may be securely attached to the platform and released from the platform by a person either in the liferaft or on the platform.

(4) Each marine evacuation system must be capable of being deployed from the OSV under unfavorable conditions of trim of up to 10 degrees either way and of list of up to 20 degrees either way.

(5) If the marine evacuation system has an inclined slide, the angle of the slide from horizontal must be within a range of 30 to 35 degrees when the OSV is upright and in the lightest seagoing condition.

(6) Each marine evacuation system platform must be capable of being restrained by a bowsing line or other positioning system that is designed to deploy automatically, and if necessary, be capable of being adjusted to the position required for evacuation.

(b) Stowage. Each marine evacuation system must be stowed as follows:

(1) There must not be any openings between the marine evacuation system's embarkation station and the OSV's side at the OSV's waterline in the lightest seagoing condition.

(2) The marine evacuation system's launching positions must be arranged, as far as practicable, to be straight down the OSV's side and safely clear the propeller and any steeply overhanging positions of the hull.

(3) The marine evacuation system must be protected from any projections of the OSV's structure or equipment.

(4) The marine evacuation system's passage and platform, when deployed; its stowage container; and its operational arrangement must not interfere with the operation of any other lifesaving appliance at any other launching station.

(5) Where appropriate, the marine evacuation system's stowage area must be protected from damage by heavy seas.

(c) Stowage of associated liferafts. Inflatable liferafts used in conjunction with the marine evacuation system must be stowed as follows:

(1) Each inflatable liferaft used in conjunction with the marine evacuation system must be close to the system container, but capable of dropping clear of the deployed chute and boarding platform.

(2) Each inflatable liferaft used in conjunction with the marine evacuation system must be capable of individual release from its stowage rack.

(3) Each inflatable liferaft used in conjunction with the marine evacuation system must be stowed in accordance with §133.130.

(4) Each inflatable liferaft used in conjunction with the marine evacuation system must be provided with preconnected or easily connected retrieving lines to the platform.

§ 133.150   Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements: General.
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(a) All survival craft required for abandonment by the total number of persons on board must be capable of being launched with their full complement of persons and equipment within 10 minutes from the time the abandon-ship signal is given.

(b) Each launching appliance for a davit-launched liferaft must be approved under approval series 160.163, with an automatic disengaging apparatus approved under approval series 160.170.

(c) Unless expressly provided otherwise, each survival craft must be provided launching appliances or marine evacuation systems, except—

(1) Those survival craft that can be boarded from a position on deck less than 4.5 meters (14.75 feet) above the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition and that have a mass of not more than 185 kilograms (407 pounds);

(2) Those survival craft that can be boarded from a position on deck less than 4.5 meters (14.75 feet) above the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition and that are stowed for launching directly from the stowed position, under unfavorable conditions of trim of 10 degrees and list of 20 degrees either way;

(3) Those survival craft that are carried in excess of the survival craft for 200 percent of the total number of persons on board the OSV, and that have a mass of not more than 185 kilograms (407 pounds);

(4) Those survival craft carried in excess of the survival craft for 200 percent of the total number of persons on board the OSV, and are stowed for launching directly from the stowed position under unfavorable conditions of trim of 10 degrees and list of 20 degrees either way;

(5) Those survival craft that are provided for use in conjunction with a marine evacuation system, and stowed for launching directly from the stowed position under unfavorable conditions of trim of 10 degrees and list of 20 degrees either way; or

(6) Liferafts installed on liftboats.

(d) Each launching appliance must be arranged so that the fully equipped survival craft the launching appliance serves can be safely launched against unfavorable conditions of trim of up to 10 degrees either way and of list of up to 20 degrees either way,—

(1) When the survival craft is loaded with its full complement of persons; and

(2) When not more than the required operating crew is on board.

(e) A launching appliance must not depend on any means other than gravity or stored mechanical power, independent of the OSV's power supplies, to launch the survival craft the launching appliance serves, in the fully loaded and equipped condition, and also in the light condition.

(f) Each launching appliance's structural attachment to the OSV must be designed to be at least 4.5 times—

(1) The load imparted on the attachment by the launching appliance and its fully loaded survival craft under the most adverse combination of list and trim as required under paragraph (b) of this section; and

(2) The ultimate strength of the construction material.

(g) Each launching appliance must be arranged so that—

(1) All parts requiring regular maintenance by the OSV's crew are readily accessible and easily maintained;

(2) The launching appliance remains effective under conditions of icing;

(3) The same type of release mechanism is used for each similar survival craft carried on board the OSV;

(4) The preparation and handling of each survival craft at any one launching station does not interfere with the prompt preparation and handling of any other survival craft at any other station;

(5) The persons on board the OSV can safely and rapidly board the survival craft;

(6) Each davit-launched liferaft can be boarded by its full complement of persons within 3 minutes from the time the instruction to board is given: and

(7) During preparation and launching, the survival craft, its launching appliance, and the area of water into which it is to be launched is illuminated by lighting supplied from the emergency source of electrical power.

(h) Each launching mechanism must be arranged so it may be actuated by one person, both from a position on the OSV's deck, and from a position within the survival craft. Each launching and recovery arrangement must allow the operator on the deck to observe the survival craft at all times during launching.

(i) Means must be provided outside the machinery space to prevent any discharge of water onto survival craft during abandonment.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52816, Oct. 1, 1998]

§ 133.153   Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements using falls and a winch.
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Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements, in addition to meeting the requirements in §133.150, must meet the following requirements:

(a) Each fall wire must be of rotation-resistant and corrosion-resistant steel wire rope.

(b) The breaking strength of each fall wire and each attachment used on the fall must be at least six times the load imparted on the fall by the fully-loaded survival craft.

(c) Each fall must be long enough for the survival craft to reach the water with the OSV in its lightest seagoing condition, under unfavorable conditions of trim and with the OSV listed not less than 20 degrees either way.

(d) Each unguarded fall must not pass near any operating position of the winch, such as hand cranks, pay-out wheels, and brake levers.

(e) Each winch drum must be arranged so the fall wire winds onto the drum in a level wrap. A multiple drum winch must be arranged so that the falls wind off at the same rate when lowering, and onto the drums at the same rate when hoisting.

(f) Each fall, where exposed to damage or fouling, must have guards or equivalent protection. Each fall that leads along a deck must be covered with a guard that is not more than 300 millimeters (1 foot) above the deck.

(g) The lowering speed for a fully loaded survival craft must be not less than that obtained from the following formula:

(1) S=0.4+(0.02 H), where S is the speed of lowering in meters per second, and H is the height in meters from the davit head to the waterline at the lightest seagoing condition.

(2) S=79+(1.2 H), where S is the speed of lowering in feet per minute, and H is the height in feet.

(h) The lowering speed for a survival craft loaded with all of its equipment must be not less than 70 percent of the speed required under paragraph (g) of this section.

(i) The lowering speed for a fully loaded survival craft must be not more than 1.3 meters per second (256 feet per minute).

(j) If a survival craft is recovered by electric power, the electrical installation, including the electric power-operated boat winch, must meet the requirements in part 129 of this chapter. If a survival craft is recovered by any means of power, including a portable power source, safety devices must be provided which automatically cut off the power before the davit arms or falls reach the stops in order to avoid overstressing the falls or davits, unless the motor is designed to prevent such overstressing.

(k) Each launching appliance must be fitted with brakes that meet the following requirements:

(1) The brakes must be capable of stopping the descent of the survival craft or rescue boat and holding it securely when loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment.

(2) The brake pads must, where necessary, be protected from water and oil.

(3) Manual brakes must be arranged so that the brake is always applied unless the operator, or a mechanism activated by the operator, holds the brake control in the off position.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996; 61 FR 40281, Aug. 1, 1996]

§ 133.160   Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.
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(a) Each davit for a rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.132 with a winch approved under approval series 160.115. If the launching arrangement uses a single fall, the davit may be of a type which is turned out manually, and the release mechanism may be an automatic disengaging apparatus approved under approval series 160.170 instead of a lifeboat release mechanism. Each rescue boat must be able to be boarded and launched directly from the stowed position with the number of persons assigned to crew the rescue boat on board. If the rescue boat is also a lifeboat and the other lifeboats are boarded and launched from an embarkation deck, the arrangements must be such that the rescue boat can also be boarded and launched from the embarkation deck.

(b) Each rescue boat must be capable of being launched with the OSV making headway of 5 knots in calm water. A painter may be used to meet this requirement.

(c) Each rescue boat embarkation and launching arrangement must permit the rescue boat to be boarded and launched in the shortest possible time.

(d) Rapid recovery of the rescue boat must be possible when loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment.

(e) Each rescue boat launching appliance must be fitted with a powered winch motor.

(f) Each rescue boat launching appliance must be capable of hoisting the rescue boat when loaded with its full rescue boat complement of persons and equipment at a rate of not less than 0.3 meters per second (59 feet per minute).

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52816, Oct. 1, 1998]

§ 133.170   Line-throwing appliance.
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(a) General. Each OSV must have a line-throwing appliance that is approved under approval series 160.031 or 160.040.

(b) Stowage. The line-throwing appliance and its equipment must be readily accessible for use.

(c) Additional equipment. Each OSV must carry the following equipment for the line-throwing appliance:

(1) The equipment on the list provided by the manufacturer with the approved appliance.

(2) An auxiliary line that—

(i) For an appliance approved under approval series 160.040, is at least 450 meters (1,500 feet) long;

(ii) For an appliance approved under approval series 160.031, is at least 150 meters (500 feet) long;

(iii) Has a breaking strength of at least 40 kiloNewtons (9,000 pounds-force); and

(iv) Is, if synthetic, a dark color or certified by the manufacturer to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light.

§ 133.175   Survival craft and rescue boat equipment.
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(a) All rescue boat equipment must be as follows:

(1) The equipment must be secured within the boat by lashings, storage in lockers or compartments, storage in brackets or similar mounting arrangements, or other suitable means.

(2) The equipment must be secured in such a manner as not to interfere with any abandonment procedures or reduce seating capacity.

(3) The equipment must be as small and of as little mass as possible.

(4) The equipment must be packed in a suitable and compact form.

(5) The equipment should be stowed so the items do not—

(i) Reduce the seating capacity;

(ii) Adversely affect the seaworthiness of the survival craft or rescue boat; or

(iii) Overload the launching appliance.

(b) Each rigid liferaft and rescue boat, unless otherwise stated in this paragraph, must carry the equipment specified for it in table 133.175 of this section. Each item in the table has the same description as in §199.175 of this chapter.

Note: Item numbers in the first column of Table 133.175 are not consecutive because not all of the items listed in section 199.175 are required on OSVs.

Table 133.175—Survival Craft Equipment

Item No.ItemOceansCoastwise
Rigid liferaft (SOLAS A Pack)Rescue boatRigid liferaft (SOLAS B Pack)Rescue boat
1Bailer11111
3Boathook11
4Bucket211
5Can opener3
6Compass11
8Drinking cup1
9Fire extinguisher11
10First-aid kit1111
11Fishing kit1
12Flashlight1111
14Heaving line1212
15Instruction card11
17Knife1,31111
18Ladder11
19Mirror, signalling11
20Oars, units411
  Paddles22
21Painter1111
22Provisions (units per person)1
23Pump511
24Radar reflector1111
26Repair kit511
27Sea anchor2121
28Searchlight11
29Seasickness kit (units per person)11
30Signal, smoke21
31Signal, hand flare66
32Signal, parachute flare44
34Sponge52222
35Survival instructions11
36Table of lifesaving signals11
37Thermal protective aids (percent of persons)610%10%10%10%
39Towline11
40Water (liters per person)1.51
41Whistle1111

Notes:

1Each liferaft equipped for 13 persons or more must carry two of these items.

2Not required for inflated or rigid-inflated rescue boats.

3A hatchet counts towards this requirement in rigid rescue boats.

4Oars are not required on a free-fall lifeboat; a unit of oars means the number of oars specified by the boat manufacturer.

5Not required for a rigid rescue boat.

6Sufficient thermal protective aids are required for at least 10% of the persons the survival craft is equipped to carry, but not less than two.

[CGD 84–069, 61 FR 25304, May 20, 1996, as amended by USCG–1999–6216, 64 FR 53227, Oct. 1, 1999]

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