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e-CFR Data is current as of October 20, 2008


Title 46: Shipping

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PART 169—SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS

Section Contents

Subpart 169.100—General Provisions

§ 169.101   Purpose.
§ 169.103   Applicability.
§ 169.107   Definitions.
§ 169.109   Equivalents.
§ 169.111   Administrative procedures.
§ 169.112   Special consideration.
§ 169.113   Right of appeal.
§ 169.115   Incorporation by reference.
§ 169.117   OMB control numbers.
§ 169.119   Vessel status.
§ 169.121   Loadlines.

Subpart 169.200—Inspection and Certification


Certificate of Inspection

§ 169.201   When required.
§ 169.203   Description.
§ 169.205   Obtaining or renewing a Certificate of Inspection.
§ 169.207   Period of validity for a Certificate of Inspection.
§ 169.209   Routes permitted.
§ 169.211   Permit to proceed for repair.
§ 169.213   Permit to carry excursion party.
§ 169.215   Certificate of inspection amendment.
§ 169.217   Posting.

Letter of Designation

§ 169.218   Procedures for designating sailing school vessels.
§ 169.219   Renewal of letter of designation.

Inspection for Certification

§ 169.220   General.
§ 169.221   Initial inspection for certification.
§ 169.222   Scope of inspection for certification.
§ 169.223   Subsequent inspections for certification.

Reinspection

§ 169.225   Annual inspection.
§ 169.226   Periodic inspection.
§ 169.227   Certificate of Inspection: Conditions of validity.

Drydocking or Hauling Out

§ 169.229   Drydock examination, internal structural examination, and underwater survey intervals.
§ 169.230   Underwater Survey in Lieu of Drydocking (UWILD).
§ 169.231   Definitions relating to hull examinations.
§ 169.233   Notice and plans required.
§ 169.234   Integral fuel oil tank examinations.

Repairs and Alterations

§ 169.235   Permission required.
§ 169.236   Inspection and testing required.

Inspections

§ 169.237   Inspection standards.
§ 169.239   Hull.
§ 169.241   Machinery.
§ 169.243   Electrical.
§ 169.245   Lifesaving equipment.
§ 169.247   Firefighting equipment.
§ 169.249   Pressure vessels.
§ 169.251   Steering apparatus.
§ 169.253   Miscellaneous systems and equipment.
§ 169.255   Sanitary inspection.
§ 169.257   Unsafe practices.
§ 169.259   Limitations of inspections.

Subpart 169.300—Construction and Arrangement


Plans

§ 169.305   Plans required.
§ 169.307   Plans for sister vessels.

Hull Structure

§ 169.309   Structural standards.
§ 169.311   Fire protection.
§ 169.313   Means of escape.
§ 169.315   Ventilation (other than machinery spaces).

Living Spaces

§ 169.317   Accommodations.
§ 169.319   Washrooms and toilets.
§ 169.323   Furniture and furnishings.

Rails and Guards

§ 169.327   Deck rails.
§ 169.329   Storm rails.
§ 169.331   Guards in hazardous locations.

Subpart 169.400—Watertight Integrity, Subdivision, and Stability

§ 169.401   Applicability.

Subpart 169.500—Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment


Lifesaving Equipment—General

§ 169.505   Equipment installed but not required.
§ 169.507   Responsibility of master.
§ 169.509   Approval for repairs and alterations.

Primary Lifesaving Equipment

§ 169.513   Types of primary equipment.
§ 169.515   Number required.
§ 169.517   Rescue boat.
§ 169.519   Availability.
§ 169.521   Stowage.

Equipment for Primary Lifesaving Apparatus

§ 169.525   General.
§ 169.527   Required equipment for lifeboats.
§ 169.529   Description of lifeboat equipment.
§ 169.535   Required equipment for lifefloats.
§ 169.537   Description of equipment for lifefloats.

Personal Flotation Devices

§ 169.539   Type required.
§ 169.541   Number required.
§ 169.543   Distribution and stowage.
§ 169.545   Markings.

Additional Lifesaving Equipment

§ 169.549   Ring lifebuoys and water lights.
§ 169.551   Exposure suits.
§ 169.553   Pyrotechnic distress signals.
§ 169.555   Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).
§ 169.556   Work vests.

Firefighting Equipment

§ 169.559   Fire pumps.
§ 169.561   Firemain.
§ 169.563   Firehose.
§ 169.564   Fixed extinguishing system, general.
§ 169.565   Fixed carbon dioxide system.
§ 169.567   Portable extinguishers.
§ 169.569   Fire axes.

Subpart 169.600—Machinery and Electrical

§ 169.601   General.

Internal Combustion Engine Installations

§ 169.605   General.
§ 169.607   Keel cooler installations.
§ 169.608   Non-integral keel cooler installations
§ 169.609   Exhaust systems.
§ 169.611   Carburetors.

Fuel Systems

§ 169.613   Gasoline fuel systems.
§ 169.615   Diesel fuel systems.

Steering Systems

§ 169.618   General.
§ 169.619   Reliability.
§ 169.621   Communications.
§ 169.622   Rudder angle indicators.
§ 169.623   Power-driven steering systems.

Ventilation

§ 169.625   Compartments containing diesel machinery.
§ 169.627   Compartments containing diesel fuel tanks.
§ 169.629   Compartments containing gasoline machinery or fuel tanks.
§ 169.631   Separation of machinery and fuel tank spaces from accommodation spaces.

Piping Systems

§ 169.640   General.
§ 169.642   Vital systems.

Bilge Systems

§ 169.650   General.
§ 169.652   Bilge piping.
§ 169.654   Bilge pumps.

Electrical

§ 169.662   Hazardous locations.

Electrical Installations Operating at Potentials of Less Than 50 Volts on Vessels of Less Than 100 Gross Tons

§ 169.664   Applicability.
§ 169.665   Name plates.
§ 169.666   Generators and motors.
§ 169.667   Switchboards.
§ 169.668   Batteries.
§ 169.669   Radiotelephone equipment.
§ 169.670   Circuit breakers.
§ 169.671   Accessories.
§ 169.672   Wiring for power and lighting circuits.
§ 169.673   Installation of wiring for power and lighting circuits.

Electrical Installations Operating at Potentials of 50 Volts or More on Vessels of Less Than 100 Gross Tons

§ 169.674   Applicability.
§ 169.675   Generators and motors.
§ 169.676   Grounded electrical systems.
§ 169.677   Equipment protection and enclosure.
§ 169.678   Main distribution panels and switchboards.
§ 169.679   Wiring for power and lighting circuits.
§ 169.680   Installation of wiring for power and lighting circuits.
§ 169.681   Disconnect switches and devices.
§ 169.682   Distribution and circuit loads.
§ 169.683   Overcurrent protection, general.
§ 169.684   Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.
§ 169.685   Electric heating and cooking equipment.
§ 169.686   Shore power.

Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over

§ 169.687   General.
§ 169.688   Power supply.
§ 169.689   Demand loads.
§ 169.690   Lighting branch circuits.
§ 169.691   Navigation lights.
§ 169.692   Remote stop stations.
§ 169.693   Engine order telegraph systems.

Subpart 169.700—Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment

§ 169.703   Cooking and heating.
§ 169.705   Mooring equipment.
§ 169.709   Compass.
§ 169.711   Emergency lighting.
§ 169.713   Engineroom communication system.
§ 169.715   Radio.
§ 169.717   Fireman's outfit.
§ 169.721   Storm sails and halyards (exposed and partially protected waters only).
§ 169.723   Safety belts.
§ 169.725   First aid kit.
§ 169.726   Radar reflector.

Markings

§ 169.730   General alarm bell switch.
§ 169.731   General alarm bells.
§ 169.732   Carbon dioxide alarm.
§ 169.733   Fire extinguishing branch lines.
§ 169.734   Fire extinguishing system controls.
§ 169.735   Fire hose stations.
§ 169.736   Self-contained breathing apparatus.
§ 169.737   Hand portable fire extinguishers.
§ 169.738   Emergency lights.
§ 169.739   Lifeboats.
§ 169.740   Liferafts and lifefloats.
§ 169.741   Personal flotation devices and ring life buoys.
§ 169.743   Portable magazine chests.
§ 169.744   Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).
§ 169.745   Escape hatches and emergency exits.
§ 169.746   Fuel shutoff valves.
§ 169.747   Watertight doors and hatches.
§ 169.750   Radio call sign.
§ 169.755   Draft marks and draft indicating systems.

Subpart 169.800—Operations

§ 169.805   Exhibition of licenses.
§ 169.807   Notice of casualty.
§ 169.809   Charts and nautical publications.
§ 169.813   Station bills.
§ 169.815   Emergency signals.
§ 169.817   Master to instruct ship's company.
§ 169.819   Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.
§ 169.821   Patrol person.
§ 169.823   Openings.
§ 169.824   Compliance with provisions of certificate of inspection.
§ 169.825   Wearing of safety belts.

Tests, Drills, and Inspections

§ 169.826   Steering, communications and control.
§ 169.827   Hatches and other openings.
§ 169.829   Emergency lighting and power systems.
§ 169.831   Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).
§ 169.833   Fire and boat drills.
§ 169.837   Lifeboats, liferafts, and lifefloats.
§ 169.839   Firefighting equipment.
§ 169.840   Verification of vessel compliance with applicable stability requirements.
§ 169.841   Logbook entries.
§ 169.847   Lookouts.
§ 169.849   Posting placards containing instructions for launching and inflating inflatable liferafts.
§ 169.853   Display of plans.
§ 169.855   Pre-underway training.
§ 169.857   Disclosure of safety standards.


Authority:   33 U.S.C. 1321(j); 46 U.S.C. 3306, 6101; Pub. L. 103–206, 107 Stat. 2439; E.O. 11735, 38 FR 21243, 3 CFR, 1971–1975 Comp., p. 793; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1; §169.117 also issued under the authority of 44 U.S.C. 3507.

Source:   CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart 169.100—General Provisions
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§ 169.101   Purpose.
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The regulations in this part set forth uniform requirements which are suited to the particular characteristics and specialized operations of sailing school vessels as defined in Title 46, United States Code section 2101(30).

§ 169.103   Applicability.
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(a) This subchapter applies to each domestic vessel operating as a sailing school vessel.

(b) This subchapter does not apply to—

(1) Any vessel operating exclusively on inland waters, which are not navigable waters of the United States;

(2) Any vessel while laid up, dismantled, and out of service;

(3) Any vessel with title vested in the United States and which is used for public purposes except vessels of the U.S. Maritime Administration;

(4) Any vessel carrying one or more passengers;

(5) Any vessel operating under the authority of a current valid certificate of inspection issued per the requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter H or T, 46 CFR parts 70 through 78 and parts 175 through 187, respectively; or

(6) Any foreign vessel.

(c) A vessel which engages in trade or commerce or carries one or more passengers, cannot operate under a certificate of inspection as a sailing school vessel, but must meet the rules and regulations governing the service in which it is engaged.

CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–5040, 67 FR 34799, May 15, 2002]

§ 169.107   Definitions.
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Anniversary date means the day and the month of each year, which corresponds to the date of expiration of the Certificate of Inspection.

Approved means accepted by the Commandant unless otherwise stated.

Coast Guard District Commander means an officer of the Coast Guard designated by the Commandant to command all Coast Guard activities within a district.

Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard or an authorized representative of the Commandant.

Demise charter means a legally binding document for a term of one year or more under which for the period of the charter, the party who leases or charters the vessel, known as the demise or bareboat charterer, assumes legal responsibility for all of the incidents of ownership, including insuring, manning, supplying, repairing, fueling, maintaining and operating the vessel. The term demise or bareboat charterer is synonymous with “owner pro hac vice”.

Existing vessel means a sailing school vessel, whose keel was laid prior to (January 9, 1986), which applies for certification as a sailing school vessel prior to (January 9, 1987), and whose initial inspection for certification is completed prior to (January 9, 1988).

Exposed Waters means waters more than 37 kilometers (20 nautical miles) from the mouth of a harbor of safe refuge, or other waters the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection determines to present special hazards due to weather or other circumstances.

Headquarters means the Office of the Commandant, United States Coast Guard, Washington, DC 20593.

Instructor means any person who is aboard a sailing school vessel for the purpose of providing sailing instruction and is not an officer, operator, or member of the crew required by regulation to be aboard the vessel, and has not paid any consideration, either directly or indirectly for his or her carriage on the vessel.

Length means the mean length. It is the mean or average between length on deck (LOD) and length between perpendiculars (LBP). Length on deck (LOD) means the length between the forward-most and after-most points on the weather deck, excluding sheer. Length between perpendiculars (LBP) means the horizontal distance between the perpendiculars taken at the forward-most and after-most points on a vessel's waterline corresponding to the deepest operating draft.

Marine Inspector means any person from the civilian or military branch of the Coast Guard assigned by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection or any other person designated by the Coast Guard to perform duties with respect to the inspection, enforcement, and administration of vessel safety and navigation laws and regulations.

Master means the senior licensed individual having command of the vessel.

New vessel means a sailing school vessel which is not an existing vessel.

Officer In Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI) means any person from the civilian or military branch of the Coast Guard designated as such by the Commandant and who, under the direction of the Coast Guard District Commander, is in charge of the inspection zone in which the vessel is located for the performance of duties with respect to the inspections, enforcement, and administration of vessel safety and navigation laws and regulations.

Partially Protected Waters means—

(1) Waters within 37 kilometers (20 nautical miles) of a harbor of safe refuge, unless determined by the OCMI to be exposed waters; and

(2) Those portions of rivers, harbors, lakes, etc. which the OCMI determines not to be sheltered.

Passenger on a sailing school vessel means an individual carried on the vessel except—

(1) The owner or an individual representative of the owner or, in the case of a vessel under charter, an individual charterer or individual representative of the charterer;

(2) The master;

(3) A member of the crew engaged in the business of the vessel, who has not contributed consideration for carriage, and who is paid for onboard services;

(4) An employee of the owner of the vessel engaged in the business of the owner, except when the vessel is operating under a demise charter;

(5) An employee of the demise charterer of the vessel engaged in the business of the demise charterer; or

(6) A sailing school instructor or sailing school student.

Protected Waters means sheltered waters presenting no special hazards such as most rivers, harbors, lakes, etc.

Qualified Organization means an educational organization, State, or political subdivision of a State that owns or demise charters, and operates a sailing school vessel for the purpose of providing sailing instruction. The educational organization must satisfy the requirements of section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 and must be exempt from tax under section 501(a) of such Code, as now or hereafter amended.

Recognized Classification Society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant.

Rules of the Road means the statutory and regulatory rules governing navigation of vessels.

Sailing instruction means teaching, research, and practical experience in operating vessels propelled primarily by sail, and may include any subject related to that operation and the sea, including seamanship, navigation, oceanography, other nautical and marine sciences, and maritime history and literature. In conjunction with any of those subjects, “sailing instruction” also includes instruction in mathematics and language arts skills to a sailing school student with a learning disability.

Sailing School Student means any person who is aboard a sailing school vessel for the purpose of receiving sailing instruction.

Sailing School Vessel means a vessel of less than 500 gross tons, carrying six or more individuals who are sailing school students or sailing school instructors, principally equipped for propulsion by sail even if the vessel has an auxiliary means of propulsion, and owned or demise chartered and operated by a qualified organization during such times as the vessel is operated exclusively for the purposes of sailing instruction.

Ship's Company means the officers and crew of a sailing school vessel, sailing school students, and sailing school instructors.

Watertight means designed and constructed to withstand a static head of water without any leakage, except that watertight equipment means enclosed equipment constructed so that a stream of water from a hose (not less than 1 inch in diameter) under head of about 35 feet from a distance of about 10 feet, and for a period of 5 minutes, can be played on the apparatus without leakage.

Weathertight means that water will not penetrate into the unit in any sea condition, except that weathertight equipment means equipment constructed or protected so that exposure to a beating rain will not result in the entrance of water.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 897, Jan. 9, 1986; 51 FR 3785, Jan. 30, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6507, Feb. 9, 2000; USCG–1999–5040, 67 FR 34799, May 15, 2002]

§ 169.109   Equivalents.
top

Substitutes for a fitting, appliance, apparatus, or equipment, may be accepted by the Commandant if the substituted item is as effective and consistent with the requirements and minimum safety standards specified in this subchapter.

§ 169.111   Administrative procedures.
top

(a) Upon receipt of a written application for inspection, the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection assigns a marine inspector to inspect the vessel at a mutually agreed upon time and place.

(b) The owner or a representative shall be present during the inspection.

(c) If during the inspection, the vessel or its equipment is found not to conform to the requirements of law or the regulations in this subchapter, the marine inspector lists all requirements which have not been met and presents the list to the owner or a representative.

(d) In any case where the owner of a vessel or his representative desires further clarification of, or reconsideration of any requirement placed against his vessel, he may discuss the matter with the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

§ 169.112   Special consideration.
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In applying the provisions of this part, the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, may give special consideration to departures from the specific requirements when special circumstances or arrangements warrant such departures and an equivalent level of safety is provided.

§ 169.113   Right of appeal.
top

Any person directly affected by a decision or action taken under this part, by or on behalf of the Coast Guard, may appeal therefrom in accordance with subpart 1.03 of this chapter.

[CGD 88–033, 54 FR 50381, Dec. 6, 1989]

§ 169.115   Incorporation by reference.
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(a) In this subchapter portions or the entire text of certain industrial standards and specifications are referred to as the governing requirements for materials, equipment, tests, or procedures to be followed. These standards and specification requirements specifically referred to in this subchapter are the governing requirements for the subject matters covered unless specifically limited, modified, or replaced by other regulations in this subchapter.

(b) These materials are incorporated by reference into this part with the approval of the Director of the Federal Register. The Office of the Federal Register publishes a table, “Material Approved for Incorporation by Reference,” which appears in the Finding Aids section of this volume. In that table is found citations to the particular sections of this part where the material is incorporated with the approval by the Director of the Federal Register. To enforce any edition other than the one listed in paragraph (c) of this section, notice of change must be published in theFederal Registerand the material must be made available. All approved material is on file at the Office of the Federal Register, Washington, DC 20408 and at the U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Design and Engineering Standards, Washington DC 20593.

(c) The materials approved for incorporation by reference in this part are:

(1) American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC), 3069 Solomons Island Road, Edgewater, MD 21037

  P–1–73—“Safe Installation of Exhaust Systems for Propulsion and Auxiliary Engines” (1973)

  H–24.9 (g) and (h)—“Fuel Strainers and Fuel Filters” (1975)

  H–2.5—“Ventilation of Boats Using Gasoline—Design and Construction” (1981)

  A–1–78—“Marine LPG—Liquefied Petroleum Gas Systems”

  A–3–70—“Recommended Practices and Standards Covering Galley Stoves”

  A–22–78—“Marine CNG—Compressed Natural Gas Systems”

(2) National Bureau of Standards, c/o Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington D.C. 20402

  Special Pub. 440 (SD Cat. No. C13.10:490), “Color: Universal Language and Dictionary of Names”, 1976

(3) National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269

  302—“Pleasure and Commercial Motor Craft,” Chapter 6 (1980)

  306—“Control of Gas Hazards on Vessels” (1980)

  70—“National Electrical Code,” Article 310–8 and Table 310–13 (1980)

(4) Naval Publications and Forms Center, Customer Service Code 1052, 5801 Tabor Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19120

  Federal Specification ZZ-H-451 “Hose, Fire, Woven-Jacketed Rubber or Cambric-Lined, with Couplings, F.”

(5) Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. (UL), 12 Laboratory Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709–3995

  UL 19–78—“Woven Jacketed, Rubber Lined Fire Hose”

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by CGD 95–072, 60 FR 50468, Sept. 29, 1995; CGD 96–041, 61 FR 50734, Sept. 27, 1996; USCG–1999–6216, 64 FR 53228, Oct. 1, 1999]

§ 169.117   OMB control numbers.
top

(a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers assigned to information collection and recordkeeping requirements in this subchapter by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. ). The Coast Guard intends that this section comply with the requirements of 44 U.S.C. 3507(f) which requires that agencies display a current control number assigned by the Director of OMB for each approved agency information collection requirement.

(b) Display.

46 CFR part—OMB control No.
§169.1111625–0002
§169.2011625–0002
§169.2051625–0002, 1625–0014, 1625–0018, 1625–0032, and 1625–0038
§169.2111625–0002
§169.2131625–0002
§169.2151625–0002
§169.2171625–0002
§169.2181625–0002, 1625–0014, 1625–0018, 1625–0032, and 1625–0038
§169.2191625–0002, 1625–0014, 1625–0018, 1625–0032, and 1625–0038
§169.2331625–0032
§169.2351625–0002
§169.3051625–0038, 1625–0064
§169.5091625–0035, 1625–0038
§169.8071625–0001
§169.8131625–0002, 1625–0014, 1625–0018, 1625–0032, and 1625–0038
§169.8401625–0064
§169.8411625–0002, 1625–0014, 1625–0018, 1625–0032, and 1625–0038
§169.8571625–0002, 1625–0014, 1625–0018, 1625–0032, and 1625–0038.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by CGD 88–072, 53 FR 34298, Sept. 6, 1988; CGD 89–037, 57 FR 41824, Sept. 11, 1992; USCG–2004–18884, 69 FR 58350, Sept. 30, 2004]

§ 169.119   Vessel status.
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For the purpose of 46 U.S.C. 11101, 46 App. U.S.C. 291 and 46 App. U.S.C. 883 a sailing school vessel is not deemed a merchant vessel or a vessel engaged in trade or commerce.

§ 169.121   Loadlines.
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Sailing school vessels must meet the applicable loadline regulations contained in Subchapter E (Load Lines) of this chapter.

Subpart 169.200—Inspection and Certification
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Certificate of Inspection
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§ 169.201   When required.
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(a) No sailing school vessel shall be operated without a valid Certificate of Inspection, Form CG–3753.

(b) Except as noted in this subpart, each sailing school vessel inspected and certificated under the provisions of this subchapter must, during the tenure of the certificate, be in full compliance with the terms of the certificate when carrying six or more individuals who are sailing school students or sailing school instructors.

(c) If necessary to prevent delay of the vessel, a temporary Certificate of Inspection, Form CG–854, is issued pending the issuance and delivery of the regular Certificate of Inspection, Form CG–3753. The temporary certificate is carried in the same manner as the regular certificate and is considered the same as the regular certificate of inspection which it represents.

§ 169.203   Description.
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The certificate of inspection issued to a vessel describes the vessel, the route which it may travel, the minimum manning requirements, the major lifesaving equipment carried, the minimum fire extinguishing equipment and life preservers required to be carried, the maximum number of sailing school students and instructors and the maximum number of persons which may be carried, the name of the owner and operator, and such conditions of operations as may be determined by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

§ 169.205   Obtaining or renewing a Certificate of Inspection.
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(a) A qualified organization attempting to obtain or renew a certificate of inspection for a vessel must submit to the Coast Guard Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection located in or nearest the port at which the inspection is to be made, the following—

(1) An application for inspection on Form CG–3752; and

(2) Evidence that the vessel has been designated as a sailing school vessel or an application for designation, as set forth in §169.218; and

(3) Information concerning the program's age and physical qualifications for students and instructors and the ratio of students to instructors.

(b) The application for initial inspection of a vessel being newly constructed or converted must be submitted prior to the start of such construction or conversion.

(c) The construction, arrangement and equipment of all vessels must be acceptable to the cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, as a prerequisite of the issuance of the initial certificate of inspection. Acceptance will be based on the information, specifications, drawings and calculations available to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, and on the successful completion of an initial inspection for certification.

(d) You must submit a written application for an inspection for certification to the cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection. To renew a Certificate of Inspection, you must submit an application at least 30 days before the expiration of the vessel's current certificate. Applications are available at any U.S. Coast Guard Sector Office or Marine Inspection Office. When renewing a Certificate of Inspection, you must schedule an inspection for certification within the 3 months before the expiration date of the current Certificate of Inspection.

(e) The condition of the vessel and its equipment must be acceptable to the cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, as a prerequisite of the certificate of inspection renewal. Acceptance will be based on the condition of the vessel as found at the inspection for certification.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6507, Feb. 9, 2000; USCG–2006–25556, 72 FR 36330, July 2, 2007]

§ 169.207   Period of validity for a Certificate of Inspection.
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(a) A Certificate of Inspection is valid for 5 years.

(b) Certificates of inspection may be revoked, or suspended and withdrawn by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, at any time for noncompliance with the provisions of this subchapter or requirements established thereunder.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6507, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.209   Routes permitted.
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(a) The area of operation for each vessel is designated by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection and recorded on its Certificate of Inspection. Each area of operation is described on the Certificate of Inspection under the major headings “exposed waters,” “partially protected waters,” or “protected waters,” as applicable. Further limitations imposed or extensions granted are described by reference to bodies of waters, geographical points, distance from geographical points, distances from land, depths of channel, seasonal limitations, etc.

(b) Operation of vessels on routes of lesser severity than those specifically described or designated on the Certificate of Inspection are permitted, unless expressly prohibited on the Certificate of Inspection. The general order of severity is: exposed, partially protected, and protected waters.

§ 169.211   Permit to proceed for repair.
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(a) The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, may issue a permit to proceed to another port for repair, Form CG–948, to a vessel if in his judgment it can be done with safety even if the Certificate of Inspection of the vessel has expired or is about to expire.

(b) The permit is issued only upon the written application of the master, owner, or agent of the vessel.

(c) The permit states upon its face the conditions under which it is issued and that guests may not be carried when operating under the permit. The permit must be carried in a manner similar to that described in §169.217(a) for a certificate of inspection.

§ 169.213   Permit to carry excursion party.
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(a) A vessel may be permitted to engage in a temporary excursion operation with a greater number of persons and/or on a more extended route than permitted by its certificate of inspection when in the opinion of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, the operation can be undertaken with safety. A “Permit To Carry Excursion Party” Form CG–949, is a prerequisite of such an operation.

(b) Any Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, having jurisdiction may issue a permit to carry an excursion party upon the written application of the operator, owner or agent of the vessel.

(c) The OCMI will reevaluate the vessel's sailing instruction program to ensure that the permit fits within the scope of the training program and that the vessel continues to meet the definition of a sailing school vessel.

(d) The OCMI may require an inspection prior to the issuance of a permit to carry an excursion party.

(e) The permit states upon its face the conditions under which it is issued, a reminder about the prohibition against carrying passengers, the number of persons the vessel may carry, the crew required, and additional lifesaving or safety equipment required, the route for which the permit is granted, and the dates on which the permit is valid.

(f) The permit must be carried with the certificate of inspection. Any vessel operating under a permit to carry an excursion party must be in full compliance with the terms of its certificate of inspection as supplemented by the permit.

§ 169.215   Certificate of inspection amendment.
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(a) An amended certificate of inspection may be issued at any time by any Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection. The amended certificate of inspection replaces the original. An amended certificate of inspection may be issued to authorize and record a change in the character of a vessel or in its route, equipment, ownership, operator, etc., from that specified in the current certificate of inspection.

(b) A request for an amended certificate of inspection must be made to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, by the master, operator, owner, or agent of the vessel at any time there is a change in the character of a vessel or in its route, equipment, ownership, operation etc., as specified in its current certificate of inspection.

(c) The OCMI may require an inspection prior to the issuance of an amended certificate of inspection.

§ 169.217   Posting.
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The certificate of inspection must be framed under glass or other suitable transparent material and posted in a conspicuous place on the vessel except on open boats where the certificate may be retained in a watertight container, which is secured to the vessel.

Letter of Designation
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§ 169.218   Procedures for designating sailing school vessels.
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(a) Upon written request by a qualified institution, a determination is made by the OCMI whether the vessel may be designated as a sailing school vessel.

(b) The request should contain sufficient information to allow the OCMI to make this determination. At a minimum the following items must be submitted:

(1) A detailed description of the vessel, including its identification number, owner, and charterer.

(2) A specific operating plan stating precisely the intended use of the vessel and the intended course of instruction for sailing school students.

(3) A copy of the Internal Revenue Service designation as a non-profit, tax-exempt, organization under sections 501(a) and 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

(4) An affidavit certifying that the owner or charterer has financial resources to meet any liability incurred for death or injury to sailing school students or sailing school instructors on voyages aboard the vessel, in an amount not less than $50,000 for each student and instructor.

(5) Any additional information as requested by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

(c) If a designation is granted it is indicated on the certificate of inspection and remains valid for the duration of the certificate, provided all operating conditions remain unchanged.

(d) In the event of a change, the institution must advise the OCMI who issued the designation. After reviewing the pertinent information concerning the change, the OCMI shall determine if the vessel is eligible to retain its designation as a sailing school vessel.

§ 169.219   Renewal of letter of designation.
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At least 60 days prior to the expiration date of the certificate of inspection, a request for renewal must be submitted in the same manner as described in §169.218. If the request for renewal is submitted to the OCMI who made the initial determination and all operating conditions remain unchanged, the information need not be resubmitted.

Inspection for Certification
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§ 169.220   General.
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(a) An inspection is required before the issuance of a certificate of inspection.

(b) An inspection for certification is not made until after receipt of the information required in §169.205(a) of this subchapter.

§ 169.221   Initial inspection for certification.
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(a) The initial inspection includes an inspection of the hull structure, yards, masts, spars, rigging, sails, machinery, and equipment, including unfired pressure vessels.

(b) The initial inspection of a vessel being newly constructed or converted normally consists of a series of inspections during the construction or conversion.

(c) The inspection ensures that the vessel and its equipment comply with the regulations in this subchapter to the extent they are applicable to the vessel being inspected, and are in accordance with approved plans. The inspection also ensures that the materials, workmanship and condition of all parts of the vessel and its machinery and equipment are in all respects satisfactory for the service intended, and that the vessel is in possession of a valid certificate issued by the Federal Communications Commission, if required.

(d) Before construction is started, the owner, operator, or builder must develop plans indicating the proposed arrangement and construction of the vessel. This list of plans to be developed and the required disposition of these plans are set forth in §169.305.

§ 169.222   Scope of inspection for certification.
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Items normally included in an Inspection for Certification are:

(a) Structure.

(b) Watertight integrity.

(c) Pressure vessels and appurtenances.

(d) Piping.

(e) Auxiliary machinery.

(f) Steering apparatus.

(g) Electrical installations.

(h) Lifesaving appliances.

(i) Navigation equipment.

(j) Fire detecting and extinguishing systems.

(k) Pollution prevention equipment.

(l) Sanitary conditions.

(m) Fire hazards.

(n) Verification of valid certificates issued by the Federal Communications Commission.

(o) Lights and signals required by navigation rules.

(p) Bilge and ballast systems.

(q) Rigging, yards, masts, spars, and sails.

§ 169.223   Subsequent inspections for certification.
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An inspection for renewal of a certificate of inspection includes an inspection of the structure, machinery, yards, spars, masts, rigging, sails, and equipment. The inspection ensures that the vessel is in satisfactory condition, fit for the service intended and complies with the applicable regulations in this subchapter.

Reinspection
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§ 169.225   Annual inspection.
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(a) Your vessel must undergo an annual inspection within 3 months before or after each anniversary date, except as specified in §169.226.

(b) You must contact the cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection to schedule an inspection at a time and place which he or she approves. No written application is required.

(c) The scope of the annual inspection is the same as the inspection for certification as specified in §169.222 but in less detail unless the cognizant marine inspector finds deficiencies or determines that a major change has occurred since the last inspection. If deficiencies are found or a major change to the vessel has occurred, the marine inspector will conduct an inspection more detailed in scope to ensure that the vessel is in satisfactory condition and fit for the service for which it is intended. If your vessel passes the annual inspection, the marine inspector will endorse your current Certificate of Inspection.

(d) If the annual inspection reveals deficiencies in your vessel's maintenance, you must make any or all repairs or improvements within the time period specified by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

(e) Nothing in this subpart limits the marine inspector from conducting such tests or inspections he or she deems necessary to be assured of the vessel's seaworthiness.

[USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6507, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.226   Periodic inspection.
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(a) Your vessel must undergo a periodic inspection within 3 months before or after the second or third anniversary of the date of your vessel's Certificate of Inspection. This periodic inspection will take the place of an annual inspection.

(b) You must contact the cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection to schedule an inspection at a time and place which he or she approves. No written application is required.

(c) The scope of the periodic inspection is the same as that for the inspection for certification, as specified in §169.222. The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection will insure that the vessel is in satisfactory condition and fit for the service for which it is intended. If your vessel passes the periodic inspection, the marine inspector will endorse your current Certificate of Inspection.

(d) If the periodic inspection reveals deficiencies in your vessel's maintenance, you must make any or all repairs or improvements within the time period specified by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

(e) Nothing in this subpart limits the marine inspector from conducting such tests or inspections he or she deems necessary to be assured of the vessel's seaworthiness.

[USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6507, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.227   Certificate of Inspection: Conditions of validity.
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To maintain a valid Certificate of Inspection, you must complete your annual and periodic inspections within the periods specified in §§169.225 and 169.226 respectively and your Certificate of Inspection must be endorsed.

[USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6507, Feb. 9, 2000]

Drydocking or Hauling Out
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§ 169.229   Drydock examination, internal structural examination, and underwater survey intervals.
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(a) Except as provided for in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, each vessel must undergo drydock and internal structural examinations as follows:

(1) If your vessel operates in saltwater, it must undergo two drydock examinations and two internal structural examinations within any 5-year period unless it has been approved to undergo an underwater survey (UWILD) under §169.230 of this part. No more than 3 years may elapse between any two examinations.

(2) If your vessel operated in fresh water at least 50 percent of the time since your last drydocking, it must undergo a dry dock and internal structural examination at intervals not to exceed 5 years unless it has been approved to undergo an underwater survey (UWILD) under §169.230 of this part.

(b) Vessels with wooden hulls must undergo two drydock and two internal structural examinations within any five year period regardless of the type of water in which they operate. No more than three years may elapse between any two examinations.

(c) If, during an internal structural examination damage or deterioration to the hull plating or structural members is discovered, the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, may require the vessel to be drydocked or otherwise taken out of service to further assess the extent of the damage and to effect permanent repairs.

(d) Each vessel which has not met with the applicable examination schedules in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section because it is on a voyage, must undergo the required examinations upon completion of the voyage.

(e) The Commandant (G-MOC) may authorize extensions to the examination intervals specified in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

[CGD 84–024, 52 FR 39656, Oct. 23, 1987, as amended at 53 FR 32232, Aug. 24, 1988; CGD 95–072, 60 FR 50468, Sept. 29, 1995; CGD 96–041, 61 FR 50734, Sept. 27, 1996; USCG–2000–6858, 67 FR 21083, Apr. 29, 2002]

§ 169.230   Underwater Survey in Lieu of Drydocking (UWILD).
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(a) The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI), on a case-by-case basis, may approve an underwater survey instead of a drydock examination at alternating intervals if your vessel is—

(1) Less than 15 years of age;

(2) A steel or aluminum hulled vessel;

(3) Fitted with an effective hull protection system; and

(4) Listed in §169.229(a)(1) or (2) of this part.

(b) For vessels less than 15 years of age, you must submit an application for an underwater survey to the OCMI at least 90 days before your vessel's next required drydock examination. The application must include—

(1) The procedure for carrying out the underwater survey;

(2) The time and place of the underwater survey;

(3) The method used to accurately determine the diver's or remotely operated vehicle's (ROV) location relative to the hull;

(4) The means for examining all through-hull fittings and appurtenances;

(5) The condition of the vessel, including the anticipated draft of the vessel at the time of survey;

(6) A description of the hull protection system; and

(7) The name and qualifications of any third party examiner.

(c) If your vessel is 15 years old or older, the cognizant District Commander, on a case-by-case basis, may approve an underwater survey instead of a drydock examination at alternating intervals. You must submit an application for an underwater survey to the OCMI at least 90 days before your vessel's next required drydock examination. You may be allowed this option if—

(1) The vessel is qualified under paragraphs (a)(2) through (4) of this section;

(2) Your application includes the information in paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(7) of this section; and

(3) During the vessel's drydock examination, preceding the underwater survey, a complete set of hull gaugings was taken and they indicated that the vessel was free from appreciable hull deterioration.

(d) After the drydock examination required by paragraph (c)(3) of this section, the OCMI submits a recommendation for future underwater surveys, the results of the hull gauging, and the results of the Coast Guards' drydock examination results to the cognizant District Commander, for review.

[USCG–2000–6858, 67 FR 21083, Apr. 29, 2002]

§ 169.231   Definitions relating to hull examinations.
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As used in the part—

(a) Drydock examination means hauling out a vessel or placing a vessel in a drydock or slipway for an examination of all accessible parts of the vessel's underwater body and all through-hull fittings, sea chests, sea valves, sea strainers, and valves for the emergency bilge suction.

(b) Underwater survey means the examination of the vessel's underwater hull including all through-hull fittings and appurtenances, while the vessel is afloat.

(c) Internal structural examination means an examination of the vessel while afloat or in drydock and consists of a complete examination of the vessel's main strength members, including the major internal framing, the hull plating, voids, and ballast tanks, but not including cargo or fuel oil tanks.

[CGD 84–024, 52 FR 39656, Oct. 23, 1987, as amended at 53 FR 32232, Aug. 24, 1988; USCG–2000–6858, 67 FR 21084, Apr. 29, 2002]

§ 169.233   Notice and plans required.
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(a) The master, owner, operator, or agent of the vessel shall notify the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, whenever the vessel is to be drydocked regardless of the reason for drydocking.

(b) Each vessel, except barges, that holds a Load Line Certificate must have on board a plan showing the vessel's scantlings. This plan must be made available to the Coast Guard marine inspector whenever the vessel undergoes a drydock examination or internal structural examination or whenever repairs are made to the vessel's hull.

(c) Each barge that holds a Load Line Certificate must have a plan showing the barge's scantlings. The plan need not be maintained on board the barge but must be made available to the Coast Guard marine inspector whenever the barge undergoes a drydock examination or internal structural examination or whenever repairs are made to the barge's hull.

[CGD 84–024, 52 FR 39656, Oct. 23, 1987]

§ 169.234   Integral fuel oil tank examinations.
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(a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the hull (“integral fuel oil tank”) is subject to inspection as provided in this section. The owner or operator of the vessel shall have the tanks cleaned out and gas freed as necessary to permit internal examination of the tank or tanks designated by the marine inspector. The owner or operator shall arrange for an examination of the fuel tanks of each vessel during an internal structural examination at intervals not to exceed five years.

(b) Integral non-double-bottom fuel oil tanks need not be cleaned out and internally examined if the marine inspector is able to determine by external examination that the general condition of the tanks is satisfactory.

(c) Double-bottom fuel oil tanks on vessels less than 10 years of age need not be cleaned out and internally examined if the marine inspector is able to determine by external examination that the general condition of the tanks is satisfactory.

(d) All double-bottom fuel oil tanks on vessels 10 years of age or older but less than 15 years of age need not be cleaned out and internally examined if the marine inspector is able to determine by internal examination of at least one forward double-bottom fuel oil tank, and by external examination of all other double-bottom fuel oil tanks on the vessel, that the general condition of the tanks is satisfactory.

(e) All double-bottom fuel oil tanks on vessels 15 years of age or older need not be cleaned out and internally examined if the marine inspector is able to determine by internal examination of at least one forward, one amidships, and one aft double-bottom fuel oil tank, and by external examination of all other double-bottom fuel oil tanks on the vessel, that the general condition of the tanks is satisfactory.

[CGD 84–024, 52 FR 39656, Oct. 23, 1987, as amended at 53 FR 32232, Aug. 24, 1988]

Repairs and Alterations
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§ 169.235   Permission required.
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(a) Repairs or alterations to the hull, machinery, or equipment which affects the safety of the vessel may not be made without the knowledge and approval of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

(b) Drawings, sketches or written specifications describing the alterations in detail must be submitted to the OCMI. Proposed alterations must be approved by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, before work is started.

(c) Drawings are not required for repairs or replacements in kind.

§ 169.236   Inspection and testing required.
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(a) The provisions of NFPA 306, “Control of Gas Hazards on Vessels,” are used as a guide in conducting the inspections and issuing certificates required by this section.

(b) Until an inspection has been made to determine that the operations can be undertaken safely, no alterations, repairs, or other operations involving riveting, welding, burning, or other fire-producing actions may be made—

(1) Within or on the boundaries of fuel tanks; or

(2) To pipelines, heating coils, pumps, fittings, or other appurtenances connected to fuel tanks.

(c) Inspections must be conducted as follows:

(1) In ports or places in the United States or its territories and possessions, the inspection must be made by a marine chemist certificated by the National Fire Protection Association; however, if the services of such certified marine chemist are not reasonably available, the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, upon the recommendation of the vessel owner and his contractor on their representative, may authorize a person to inspect the particular vessel. If the inspection indicates that the operations can be undertaken with safety, a certificate setting forth this fact in writing must be issued by the certified marine chemist or the authorized person before the work is started. The certificate must include any requirements necessary to reasonably maintain safe conditions in the spaces certified throughout the operation, including any precautions necessary to eliminate or minimize hazards that may be present from protective coatings or residues from cargoes.

(2) When not in a port or place in the United States or its territories and possessions, and when a marine chemist or a person authorized by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, is not reasonably available, the senior officer present shall conduct the inspection and enter the results of the inspection in the vessel's logbook.

(d) It is the responsibility of the senior officer present to secure copies of certificates issued by the certified marine chemist or a person authorized by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection. It is the responsibility of the senior officer present, insofar as the persons under his control are concerned, to maintain a safe condition on the vesssel by full observance of all requirements listed by the marine chemist in the certificate.

Inspections
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§ 169.237   Inspection standards.
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Vessels are inspected for compliance with the standards required by this subchapter. Items not covered by standards in this subchapter must be in accordance with good marine practice and acceptable to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

§ 169.239   Hull.
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At each inspection for certification and periodic inspection, the vessel must be afloat and ready for the following tests and inspections of the hull structure and its appurtenances:

(a) All accessible parts of the exterior and interior of the hull, the watertight bulkheads, and weather deck are examined. Where the internals of the vessel are completely concealed, sections of the lining or ceiling may be removed or the parts otherwise probed or exposed so that the inspector may be satisfied as to the condition of the hull structure.

(b) All watertight closures in the hull, decks and bulkheads are examined and operated.

(c) The condition of the superstructure, masts, and similar arrangements constructed on the hull is checked. All spars, standing rigging, running rigging, blocks, fittings, and sails, including storm sails are inspected.

(d) All railings and bulwarks and their attachment to the hull structure are inspected. Special attention is paid to ensure that guards or rails are provided in all dangerous places.

(e) All weathertight closures above the weather deck are inspected. The provisions for drainage of sea water from the exposed decks are checked.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.241   Machinery.
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(a) At each inspection for certification and periodic inspection, the marine inspector will examine and test the following items to the extent necessary, to determine that they are in proper operating condition and fit for the service for which they are intended:

(1) Engine starting system. Alternate methods of starting are checked.

(2) Engine control mechanisms. Mechanisms are operationally tested and visually examined.

(3) Auxiliary machinery. All machinery essential to the routine operation of the vessel is checked.

(4) Fuel systems. Tanks, tank vents and other appurtenances, piping and pipe fittings are examined. The fuel systems for the auxiliary propulsion engines and all other fuel systems installed are checked. All valves in the fuel lines are tested by operating locally and at remote operating positions.

(5) Sea valves and bulkhead closure valves. All overboard discharge and intake valves are checked.

(6) Bilge and drainage systems. The means provided for pumping bilges are operationally tested. All suction strainers are examined.

(b) During all inspections special attention is paid to ensure that no fire hazards exist and that guards or protective devices are provided in all hazardous places.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.243   Electrical.
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At each inspection for certification and periodic inspection, the marine inspector will examine and test the following items to the extent necessary, to determine that they are in proper operating condition, in safe electrical condition, and fit for the service for which they are intended:

(a) Electrical cable. All cable is examined as far as practicable without undue disturbance of the cable or electrical apparatus.

(b) Overload or circuit protective devices. Circuit breakers are tested by manual operation and fuses examined visually. The ratings of fuses are checked to determine suitability for the service intended.

(c) Rotating machinery. Rotating electrical machinery essential to the routine operation of the vessel is examined.

(d) Generators, etc. All generators, motors, lighting fixtures and circuit interrupting devices located in spaces or areas which may contain flammable vapors are checked.

(e) Storage batteries. Batteries are checked for condition and security of stowage.

(f) Fire detection and alarm system. Electrical apparatus, which operates as part of or in conjunction with a fire detection or alarm system installed on board the vessel, is operationally tested. The test is applied, in a manner to simulate, as closely as practicable, the actual operation in case of fire.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.245   Lifesaving equipment.
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At each inspection for certification and periodic inspection the following tests and inspections of lifesaving equipment will be conducted:

(a) All air tank buoyant units of all lifesaving appliances are tested for airtightness.

(b) Each lifeboat is lowered to near the water and loaded with its allowed capacity, evenly distributed throughout the length. The total weight used is at least equal to the allowed capacity of the lifeboat considering persons to weigh 75 kg (165 pounds) each. The lifeboat is then lowered into the water until it is afloat and released from the falls.

(c) Each personal flotation device is examined to determine its serviceability. If found to be satisfactory, it is stamped “Passed,” together with the date and the port. If found to be unsatisfactory, the personal flotation device must be removed from the vessel's equipment and repaired. If it is beyond repair it must be destroyed in the presence of the Coast Guard inspector.

(d) Each lifeboat winch electrical control apparatus is opened and inspected.

(e) Where gravity davits are installed, it must be demonstrated that the lifeboat can be swung out and lowered from any stopped position by merely releasing the brake on the lifeboat winch. The use of force to start the davits or the lifeboat winch is not permitted.

(f) Inflatable liferaft containers are examined for defects and the inspector verifies that the inflatable liferafts and hydraulic releases, if installed, have been serviced at an approved facility in accordance with the provisions of subparts 160.051 and 160.062, respectively, of this chapter.

(g) All other items of lifesaving equipment are examined to determine that they are in suitable condition.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.247   Firefighting equipment.
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(a) At each inspection for certification and periodic inspection and at such other times as considered necessary all fire-extinguishing equipment is inspected to ensure it is in suitable condition. Tests may be necessary to determine the condition of the equipment. The inspector verifies that the tests and inspections required in Tables 169.247 (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this subchapter have been conducted by a qualified servicing facility at least once every twelve months.

(1) Hand portable fire extinguishers and semi-portable fire extinguishing systems are examined for excessive corrosion and general condition.

(2) All parts of the fixed fire-extinguishing systems are examined for excessive corrosion and general condition.

(3) Piping, controls, valves, and alarms on all fire-extinguishing systems are checked to be certain the system is in operating condition.

(4) The fire main system is operated and the pressure checked at the most remote and highest outlets.

(5) Each firehose is subjected to a test pressure equivalent to its maximum service pressure.

Table 169.247(a)(1)—Portable Extinguishers

Type unitTest
FoamDischarge. Clean hose and inside of extinguisher thoroughly. Recharge.
Carbon dioxideWeigh cylinders. Recharge if weight loss exceeds 10 pct of weight of charge. Inspect hose and nozzle to be sure they are clear.
Dry chemical (cartridge-operated type)Examine pressure cartridge and replace if end is punctured or if cartridge is otherwise determined to have leaked or to be in unsuitable condition. Inspect hose and nozzle to see they are clear. Insert charged cartridge. Be sure dry chemical is free-flowing (not caked) and chamber contains full charge.
Dry chemical (stored pressure)See that pressure gage is in operating range. If not, or if seal is broken, weigh or otherwise determine that full charge of dry chemical is in extinguisher. Recharge if pressure is low or if dry chemical is needed.
HALON 1211 or HALON 1301)See that pressure gage, if provided, is in operating range. Recharge if pressure is low. Weigh cylinder. Recharge if weight loss exceeds 10 pct of weight of charge. Inspect hose and nozzle to ensure they are clear.

Table 169.247(a)(2)—Fixed Systems

Type systemTest
Carbon dioxide or HALON 1301Weigh cylinders. Recharge if weight loss exceeds 10 pct of weight of charge.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.249   Pressure vessels.
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Pressure vessels must meet the requirements of part 54 of this chapter. The inspection procedures for pressure vessels are contained in subpart 61.10 of this chapter.

§ 169.251   Steering apparatus.
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At each inspection for certification and periodic inspection the steering apparatus is inspected and operationally tested to determine that its condition is satisfactory and that it is fit for the service intended.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.253   Miscellaneous systems and equipment.
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(a) At each inspection for certification and periodic inspection all items in the ship's outfit, such as ground tackle, navigation lights, compass, etc., which are required to be carried by the regulations in this subchapter are examined and tested as necessary to determine that they are fit the service intended.

(b) Approved work vests, where carried, are inspected as provided in §169.556.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.255   Sanitary inspection.
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At each inspection for certification, periodic inspection, and annual inspection quarters, toilet and washing spaces, galleys, serving pantries, lockers, etc., are examined to determine that they are serviceable and in a sanitary condition.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.257   Unsafe practices.
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(a) At each inspection for certification, periodic inspection, annual inspection, and at every other vessel inspection all observed unsafe practices and hazardous situations must be corrected.

(b) At each inspection for certification, periodic inspection, annual inspection, and at every other vessel inspection the bilges and other spaces are examined to see that there is no accumulation of oil or other matter which might create a fire hazard.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–1999–4976, 65 FR 6508, Feb. 9, 2000]

§ 169.259   Limitations of inspections.
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The OCMI may require that a vessel and its equipment meet any test or inspection deemed necessary to determine that they are suitable for the service in which they are to be employed.

Subpart 169.300—Construction and Arrangement
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Plans
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§ 169.305   Plans required.
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(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section the owner or builder shall, before the start of construction or before the initial inspection of the vessel, submit to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection of the inspection zone where the vessel is to be inspected, at least one copy of each of the following plans:

(1) Midship section.

(2) Outboard profile.

(3) Inboard profile.

(4) Arrangement of decks.

(5) Lifesaving equipment installation and arrangement.

(6) Machinery installation.

(7) Electrical installation.

(8) Fire control plan.

(9) Fuel tanks.

(10) Piping systems.

(11) Hull penetrations and shell connections.

(12) Lines and offsets, curves of form, and capacities of the tanks including size and location on vessel.

(13) Masts, including integration into the ship's structure.

(14) Rigging plan showing sail areas and centers of effort as well as the arrangement, dimensions, and connections of the standing rigging.

(b) For vessels less than 65 feet in length, the owner may submit specifications, sketches, photographs, line drawings or written descriptions in lieu of any of the required drawings provided the required information is adequately detailed and acceptable to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

(c) The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, may waive submission of some or all of the structural plans called for by paragraph (a) of this section for an existing vessel with a history of at least 5 years of safe operation, or if the design and construction of the vessel are essentially similar to a vessel which has a proven record of safe operation in similar service upon similar waters.

§ 169.307   Plans for sister vessels.
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Plans are not required for any vessel which is a sister ship to a vessel, provided that—

(a) The approved plans for the original vessels are already on file at any Marine Inspection Office;

(b) The owner of the plans authorizes their use for the new construction;

(c) The regulations have not changed since the original plan approval; and

(d) There are no major modifications to any of the systems used.

Hull Structure
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§ 169.309   Structural standards.
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(a) Compliance with the standards established by a recognized classification society will, in general, be considered satisfactory evidence of the structural adequacy of a vessel.

(b) Masts, posts and other supporting structures are to have adequate strength to withstand the highest loadings imposed by the sail systems during all normal and emergency conditions. Particular attention must be given to the integration of the masts and rigging into the hull structure. The hull structure must be adequately reinforced and stiffened locally to ensure sufficient strength and resistance to plate buckling.

(c) The design, materials, and construction of masts, yards, booms, bowsprits, and standing rigging must be suitable for the intended service. Detailed calculations with respect to the strength of the sail system may be required. Approval by a recognized classification society may be considered satisfactory evidence of the adequacy of the sail system.

(d) When scantlings differ from established standards and it can be demonstrated that a craft approximating the same size, power and displacement has been built to the proposed scantlings and has been in satisfactory service, insofar as structural adequacy is concerned, for a period of a least 5 years, the proposed scantling may be approved. A detailed structural analysis may be required.

(e) Special consideration will be given to the structural requirements of vessels not contemplated by the standards of a recognized classification society and to the use of materials not specially included in these standards.

§ 169.311   Fire protection.
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(a) The general construction of the vessel must be designed to minimize fire hazards. Each vessel which carries more than 100 persons or has overnight accommodations for more than 49 persons must meet the requirements of subpart 72.05 of this chapter. Each vessel which is certificated to carry 100 persons or less or had overnight accommodations for less than 50 persons must meet the requirements of §169.323.

(b) A fire detector, listed by a recognized testing laboratory, must be installed in each unmanned engine space.

(c) Smoke detectors, listed by a recognized testing laboratory, must be installed in each berthing compartment, sail locker, and public area.

(d) Internal combustion engine exhausts, boiler and galley uptakes, and similar sources of ignition must be kept clear of and suitably insulated from any woodwork or other combustible matter.

(e) Lamp, paint, oil lockers and similar compartments must be constructed of metal or wholly lined with metal.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 897, Jan. 9, 1986; 51 FR 3785, Jan. 30, 1986]

§ 169.313   Means of escape.
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(a) Except as provided by paragraph (f) of this section, there must be at least two means of escape from all areas generally accessible to persons onboard. At least one means of escape must be independent of watertight doors and lead directly to the open deck. Windows and windshields of sufficient size and proper accessibility may be used as one avenue of escape.

(b) The two means of escape must be as widely separated as practical to minimize the possibility of one incident blocking both escapes.

(c) Except as provided by paragraph (d) of this section, a vertical ladder and deck scuttle may not be designated as one of the means of escape.

(d) A vertical ladder and deck scuttle may be used as a second means of escape if—

(1) The primary means of escape is an enclosed stairtower or stairway;

(2) The installation of two stairways is impracticable;

(3) The scuttle is located where it can not be interfered with; and

(4) The scuttle is fitted with a quick-acting release and a hold-back to hold the scuttle in an open position.

(e) The required means of escape must not have locking devices.

(f) Where the length of the compartment is less than 12 feet, one vertical means of escape is acceptable provided that—

(1) There is no source of fire in the space, such as a galley stove, heater, etc., and the vertical escape is remote from the engine or fuel tank space, and

(2) The arrangement is such that the installation of two means of escape does not materially improve the safety of the vessel or those on board.

(g) Dead end corridors or the equivalent, more than 40 feet in length are prohibited.

(h) Each means of escape must be of adequate size to accommodate rapid evacuation.

(i) Each vertical ladder must have rungs that are:

(1) At least 16 inches in length;

(2) Not more than 12 inches apart, uniform for the length of the ladder;

(3) At least 3 inches from the nearest permanent object in back of the ladder; and

(4) Except when unavoidable obstructions are encountered, there must be at least 41/2inches clearance above each rung.

§ 169.315   Ventilation (other than machinery spaces).
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(a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel must be properly ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space.

(b) A means must be provided to close off all vents and ventilators.

(c) Living spaces must be ventilated by a mechanical system unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation in all ordinary weather conditions. Provided that paragraph (a) of this section is satisfied, a vessel having only a natural ventilation system must satisfy the following: V/A≥1.4 where V is the total area of the vents in square inches and A is the product in square feet of the vessel's design waterline length times its maximum beam.

Living Spaces
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§ 169.317   Accommodations.
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(a) Quarters must have sufficient fresh air, light and heat. Quarters must not be located forward of the collision bulkhead or farther forward in the vessel than a vertical plane located at 5 percent of the vessel's loadline length abaft the forward side of the stem. The space must not be located totally below the deepest load waterline.

(b) Bulkheads separating accommodations from machinery spaces, paint lockers, storerooms, washrooms, and toilet facilities are to be odorproof.

(c) All quarters are to be properly drained, odorproof and protected from heat and noise.

(d) Each person on board must have a separate berth which is of sufficient size and generally clear of all pipes, ventilation ducts and other installations.

(e) Each bunk must be constructed of wood, fiberglass or metal. If fitted with a mattress, the mattress must be covered with material which has been treated to give it fire resistant properties and which will provide the mattress with a reasonably smooth surface. There must be a minimum vertical distance between bunks of 24 inches.

(f) A means of access must be provided for each berthing arrangement where the upper berth is more than 60 inches above the deck.

(g) The construction and arrangement must allow free and unobstructed access to each berth. Each berth must be immediately adjacent to an aisle leading to a means of escape from the living area.

(h) A properly arranged hammock may be used as a berth.

§ 169.319   Washrooms and toilets.
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(a) Sailing school vessels must have one toilet and one washbasin for every 20 persons. Each toilet and washbasin must have adequate plumbing.

(b) Each washroom and toilet room must properly drain and the scupper to the washroom must be of sufficient size and situated in the lowest part of the space.

(c) Each sailing school vessel must meet the applicable requirements of Title 33, Code of Federal Regulations, part 159.

§ 169.323   Furniture and furnishings.
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Each sailing school vessel certificated to carry 100 persons or less or having overnight accommodations for less than 50 persons must meet the following requirements:

(a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, all free-standing furniture must be constructed of noncombustible material. Upholstery and padding used in furniture must be of fire resistant materials.

(b) Existing solid wooden furniture may be retained on existing vessels.

(c) Draperies must be fabricated of fire resistant fabrics.

(d) Rugs and carpets must be of wool or other material having equivalent fire resistant qualities.

(e) Trash receptacles must be constructed of non-combustible materials with solid sides and bottoms and have solid noncombustible covers.

Rails and Guards
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§ 169.327   Deck rails.
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(a) All rails or lifelines must be at least 30 inches high and permanently supported by stanchions at intervals of not more than 7 feet. Stanchions must be through bolted or welded to the deck.

(b) Rails or lifelines must consist of evenly spaced courses. The spacing between courses must not be greater than 12 inches. The opening below the lowest course must not be more than 9 inches. Lower rail courses are not required where all or part of the space below the upper rail is fitted with a bulwark, chain link fencing, wire mesh, or an equivalent.

(c) Small vessels of the open type and vessels of unusual construction must have rails or equivalent protection as considered necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

§ 169.329   Storm rails.
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Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where necessary in all passageways, at deckhouse sides, and at ladders and hatches where persons might have normal access.

§ 169.331   Guards in hazardous locations.
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Each exposed hazard, such as gears or machinery, must be properly protected with covers, guards, or rails.

Subpart 169.400—Watertight Integrity, Subdivision, and Stability
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§ 169.401   Applicability.
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Each vessel must meet the applicable requirements in Subchapter S, parts 170–174, of this chapter.

Subpart 169.500—Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment
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Lifesaving Equipment—General
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§ 169.505   Equipment installed but not required.
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Each item of lifesaving equipment installed on board a vessel must be of an approved type.

§ 169.507   Responsibility of master.
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The master or operator shall ensure that the lifeboats, liferafts, davits, falls, personal flotation devices, and other lifesaving appliances are at all times ready for use, and that all equipment required by the regulations in this subchapter is provided, maintained, serviced, and replaced as indicated.

§ 169.509   Approval for repairs and alterations.
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No extensive repairs or alterations, except in an emergency, may be made to any item of lifesaving equipment without advance notice to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection. Repairs and alterations must be made to the original standard of construction and tested in the manner specified in this subpart and applicable requirements in Subchapter Q of this chapter. Emergency repairs or alterations must be reported as soon as practicable to the nearest Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

Primary Lifesaving Equipment
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§ 169.513   Types of primary equipment.
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(a) Lifeboats. Each lifeboat must be of a type approved under subpart 160.035 of this chapter. Installation and arrangement of each lifeboat including davits and winches must meet the requirements of part 94 of this chapter.

(b) Inflatable liferafts. (1) Each inflatable liferaft must be a SOLAS A inflatable liferaft approved under part 160, subpart 160.151, of this chapter, except that inflatable liferafts on vessels operating on protected or partially protected waters may be SOLAS B inflatable liferafts approved under part 160, subpart 160.151, of this chapter.

(2) Each approved inflatable liferaft on the vessel on September 30, 2002, may be used to meet the requirements of this part as long as it is continued in use on the vessel, and is in good and serviceable condition.

(c) Life floats. Each lifefloat must be of a type approved under subpart 160.027 of this subchapter.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–2001–11118, 67 FR 58541, Sept. 17, 2002]

§ 169.515   Number required.
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(a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, each vessel must have sufficient lifeboats or inflatable liferafts to accommodate all persons on board .

(b) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters must have additional inflatable liferafts to accommodate 25% of the persons on board or the number of persons accommodated in the largest lifeboat or liferaft, whichever is greater.

(c) Vessels certificated for protected waters only may carry lifefloats of a combined capacity to accommodate all persons on board in lieu of the lifeboats and inflatable liferafts required in paragraph (a) of this section.

§ 169.517   Rescue boat.
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All vessels certificated for exposed or partially protected waters service must have a suitable motor rescue boat, except when a motor lifeboat is provided or when, in the opinion of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, the vessel is of such design and operating characteristics that the vessel itself provides a satisfactory man overboard rescue platform.

§ 169.519   Availability.
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(a) Each lifeboat, inflatable liferaft, and lifefloat must be kept in good working order and be readily available.

(b) The decks on which lifeboats, liferafts, and lifefloats are carried must be kept clear of obstructions which could interfere with the immediate boarding and launching of the lifesaving appliances.

§ 169.521   Stowage.
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(a) General. Each lifeboat, inflatable liferaft, and lifefloat must be stowed so that—

(1) It is capable of being launched within 10 minutes or, in the case of vessels having one compartment subdivision, 30 minutes;

(2) It does not impede the launching or handling of other lifesaving appliances;

(3) It does not impede the marshaling of persons at the embarkation stations, or their embarkation; and

(4) It is capable of being put in the water safely and rapidly even under unfavorable conditions of list and trim.

(b) Lifeboat stowage. Each lifeboat must be stowed to meet the following requirements:

(1) Each lifeboat must be attached to a separate set of davits.

(2) Lifeboats must not be stowed in the bow of the vessel nor so far aft as to be endangered by the propellers or overhang of the stern.

(3) Lifeboats must be stowed so that it is not necessary to lift them in order to swing out the davits.

(4) Means must be provided for bringing the lifeboats against the ship's side and holding them there so that persons may safely embark, unless the lifeboats are arranged for boarding at the stowage position.

(5) Lifeboats must be fitted with skates or other suitable means to facilitate launching against an adverse list of up to 15 degrees. However, skates may be dispensed with if, in the opinion of the Commandant, the arrangements ensure that the lifeboats can be satisfactorily launched without them.

(6) Means must be provided outside the machinery space to prevent the discharge of water into the lifeboats while they are being lowered.

(c) Inflatable liferaft stowage. Inflatable liferafts must be stowed so that they will float free in the event of the vessel sinking. Stowage and launching arrangements must be to the satisfaction of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

(d) Life float stowage. Each life float must be stowed to meet the requirements of this paragraph.

(1) Each life float must be secured to the vessel by a painter and a float-free link that is—

(i) Certified to meet subpart 160.073 of this chapter;

(ii) Of proper strength for the size of the life float as indicated on its identification tag; and

(iii) Secured to the painter at one end and secured to the vessel on the other end.

(2) The means by which the float-free link is attached to the vessel must—

(i) Have a breaking strength of at least the breaking strength of the painter.

(ii) If synthetic, be of a dark color or of a material certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light; and

(iii) If metal, be corrosion resistant.

(3) If the life float does not have a painter attachment fitting, a means for attaching the painter must be provided by a wire or line that—

(i) Encircles the body of the device;

(ii) Will not slip off;

(iii) Has a breaking strength that is at least the breaking strength of the painter; and

(iv) If synthetic, is of a dark color or is of a material certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light.

(4) The float-free link described in paragraphs (d)(1) and (d)(2) of this section is not required if the vessel operates solely in waters that have a depth less than the length of the painter.

(5) If the vessel carries more than one life float, the life floats may be grouped and each group secured by a single painter, provided that—

(i) The combined weight of each group of life floats does not exceed 400 pounds;

(ii) Each life float is individually attached to the painter by a line that meets paragraphs (d)(2) and (d)(3) of this section and which is long enough so that each can float without contacting any other life float in the group; and

(iii) The strength of the float-free link and the strength of the painter under paragraphs (d)(1)(ii) and (d)(2) of this section is determined by the combined capacity of the group of life floats.

(6) Each life float, as stowed, must be capable of easy launching. Life floats weighing over 400 pounds must not require lifting before launching.

(7) Life floats must be secured to the vessel only by a painter and lashings that can be easily released or by hydraulic releases. They must not be stowed in more than four tiers. When stowed in tiers, the separate units must be kept apart by spacers.

(8) There must be means to prevent shifting.

(e) Hydraulic Releases. Each hydraulic release used in the installation of any inflatable liferaft or life float must meet subpart 160.062 of this chapter.

Equipment for Primary Lifesaving Apparatus
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§ 169.525   General.
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(a) Equipment for primary lifesaving apparatus must kept in good condition.

(b) Lifeboats, inflatable liferafts and lifefloats must be fully equipped before the vessel is navigated and throughout the voyage.

(c) No person may stow in any lifeboat, inflatable liferaft, or lifefloat any article not required by this subpart unless the article is authorized by the OCMI, in good working order, and properly stowed so as not to reduce the seating capacity, the space available to the occupants, or adversely affect the seaworthiness of the livesaving apparatus.

(d) Loose equipment, except boathooks in lifeboats, must be securely attached to the lifesaving appliance to which it belongs.

§ 169.527   Required equipment for lifeboats.
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Lifeboats must be equipped in accordance with Table 169.527. This equipment is described in §169.529.

Table 169.527

Letter identification and itemExposed and partially protected watersProtected waters
a—Bailer1None
b—Bilge pump1None
c—Boathooks21
d—Bucket21
e—Compass and mounting1None
f—Ditty bag1None
g—Drinking cup1None
h—Fire extinguisher (motor-propelled lifeboats only)22
i—First-aid kit1None
j—Flashlight1None
k—Hatchet21
l—Heaving line2None
m—Jackknife1None
n—Ladder, lifeboat, gunwale1None
o—Lantern11
p—Lifeline11
q—Life preservers22
r—Locker1None
s—Mast and sail (oar-propelled lifeboats only)1None
t—Matches (boxes)21
u—Mirror, signaling2None
v—Oars (units)11
w—Oil, illuminating (quarts)1None
x—Oil, storm, (gallons)1None
y—Painter21
z—Plug11
aa—Provisions (per person)2None
bb—Rowlocks (units)11
cc—Rudder and tiller1None
dd—Sea anchor1None
ee—Signals, distress, floating orange smoke2None
ff—Signals, distress, red hand flare (units)1None
gg—Signals, distress, red parachute flare (units)1None
hh—Tool kit (motor-propelled lifeboats only)11
ii—Water (quarts per person)3None
jj—Whistle, signaling1None
kk—Fishing kit1None
ll—Cover, protecting1None
mm—Signals, lifesaving1None
§ 169.529   Description of lifeboat equipment.
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(a) Bailer. The bailer must have a lanyard attached and must be of sufficient size and suitable for bailing.

(b) Bilge pump. Bilge pumps must be approved under subpart 160.044 of this chapter. They must be of the size given in Table 169.529(b) depending upon the capacity of the lifeboat as determined by the six-tenths rule as described in §160.035–9(b) of this chapter.

Table 169.529(b)

Capacity of lifeboat, cubic feetBilge pump size
Over—Not over—
3301
3307002
7003

(c) Boathooks. Boathooks must be of the single hook ballpoint type. Boathook handles must be of clear grained white ash, or equivalent, and of a length and diameter as given in Table 169.529(c).

Table 169.529(c)

Length of lifeboat, feetBoathook handles
Over—Not over—Diameter, inchesLength, feet
231.50 8
23291.7510
292   12

(d) Bucket. Each bucket must be of heavy gage galvanized iron, or other suitable corrosion-resistant metal, of not less than 2-gallon capacity, and must have a 6-foot lanyard of 12-thread manila or equivalent attached.

(e) Compass and mounting. The compass and mounting must be of an approved type.

(f) Ditty bag. The ditty bag must consist of a canvas bag or equivalent and must contain a sailmaker's palm, needles, sail twine, marline, and marline spike.

(g) Drinking cups. Drinking cups must be enamel coated or plastic, graduated in milliliters or ounces, and provided with lanyards 3 feet in length.

(h) Fire extinguishers. Each fire extinguisher must be an approved Type B-C, Size I. One must be attached to each end of the lifeboat.

(i) First-aid kit. The first-aid kit must be approved under subpart 160.041 of this chapter.

(j) Flashlights. Each flashlight must be approved under §94.20–15(j) of this chapter. Three spare cells (or one 3-cell battery) and two spare bulbs, stowed in a watertight container, must be provided with each flashlight. Batteries must be replaced yearly during the annual stripping, clearing, and overhaul of the lifeboat.

(k) Hatchets. Hatchets must be approved under subpart 160.013 of this chapter. They must be attached to the lifeboat by individual lanyards and be readily available for use, one at each end of the lifeboat.

(l) Heaving line. The heaving line must be of adequate strength, 10 fathoms in length, and 1 inch in circumference. It must remain buoyant after being submerged for 24 hours.

(m) Jackknife. The jackknife must be approved under subpart 160.043 of this chapter.

(n) Ladder, lifeboat gunwale. The lifeboat gunwale ladder must consist of 3 flat wood steps with cut outs for hand holds. The steps must be spaced 12 inches apart and fastened with5/8inch diameter manila rope or equivalent. Each rope end must be tied inside the lifeboat at about amidships with the ladder stowed on top of the side benches and ready for immediate use.

(o) Lantern. The lantern must contain sufficient oil to burn for at least 9 hours, and be ready for immediate use. In totally enclosed lifeboats, an interior lighting system may be used in lieu of a lantern.

(p) Lifeline. The lifeline must be properly secured to both sides of the lifeboat along its entire length, festooned in bights not longer than 3 feet, with a seine float in each bight. The float may be omitted if the line is of an inherently buoyant material and absorbs little or no water. The lifeline must be of a size and strength not less than3/8-inch diameter manila. The bights must hang to within 12 inches of the water when the lifeboat is light.

(q) Life preservers. Life preservers must be of an approved type. These preservers are in addition to those required by §169.539 of this chapter.

(r) Locker. The locker must be suitable for the storage and preservation of the small items of equipment required under §169.527.

(s) Mast and sail. A unit, consisting of a standing lug sail together with the necessary spars and rigging, must be provided in accordance with Table 169.529(s). The sails must be of good quality canvas, or other material acceptable to the Commandant, colored Indian Orange (Cable No. 70072, Standard Color Card of America). Rigging must consist of galvanized wire rope not less than three-sixteenths inch in diameter. The mast and sail must be protected by a suitable cover.

Table 169.529(s)

Length of lifeboat, feetStanding lug sailCommercial designation numberMast1Yard1
Over—Not over—Area, square feetLuff and head lengthsLeach lengthFoot lengthClew to throatOunces per square yardLengthDiameter, inchesLengthDiameter, inches
FeetInchesFeetInchesFeetInchesFeetInchesFeetInchesFeetInches
1758 51112 1 810101014.351011 23   6112  
1719 74 6 813 810 012 214.351012 63   7 82  
1921 93 7 515 111 213 814.351013103 1/2 8 52 1/2
2123113 8 3161112 415 114.351015 23 1/2 9 32 1/2
2325135 9 018 613 616 614.351016 64  10 03  
2527158 9 920 014 7171017.50 817104  10 93  
272918110 521 515 719 117.50 819 24 1/211 53 1/4
293120311 022 816 620 320.74 620 64 1/212 03 1/4
312

1Mast lengths measured from heel to center of upper halyard sheave. Mast diameters measured at thwart. Mast and yard shall be of clear-grained spruce, fir, or equivalent.

2Subject to special consideration.

(t) Matches. A box of friction matches in a watertight container, stowed in an equipment locker or secured to the underside of the stern thwart if no locker is fitted, must be provided.

(u) Mirrors, signaling. Signaling mirrors must be of an approved type.

(v) Oars. A unit, consisting of a complement of rowing oars and steering oar, must be provided for each lifeboat in accordance with Table 169.529(v) except that motor-propelled and hand-propelled lifeboats need only be equipped with four rowing oars and one steering oar. In any case, the emergency lifeboats must be provided with the full complement of oars prescribed by the table. All oars must be buoyant.

Table 169.529(v)

Length of lifeboat (feet)Number of oars—Length of oars (feet)—
Over—Not over—RowingSteeringRowingSteering
154189
1519611011
1921611112
2123611213
2325811314
2527811415
27811516

(w) Oil, illuminating. One quart of illuminating oil must be provided in a metal container if a lantern is carried.

(x) Oil, storm. One gallon of vegetable, fish, or animal oil must be provided in a suitable metal container so constructed as to permit a controlled distribution of oil on the water, and so arranged that it can be attached to the sea anchor.

(y) Painter. Painters must be of manila rope not less than 23/4inches in circumference, or equivalent, and of a length not less than 3 times the distance between the deck on which the lifeboat is stowed and the light draft of the vessel. For lifeboats on vessels certificated for exposed or partially protected water service, one of the painters must have a long eye splice and be attached to the thwart with a toggle. The other painter must be attached to the stem.

(z) Plug. The automatic drain required in the lifeboat must be provided with a cap or plug attached to the lifeboat by a suitable chain.

(aa) Provisions. Approved emergency rations must be provided, consisting of 10,000 kJ (2390 calories) for each person the lifeboat is approved to carry. The provisions must be stowed in lockers or other compartments providing suitable protection.

(bb) Rowlocks. A unit, consisting of sufficient rowlocks and rowlock sockets for each oar required by Table 169.529(v) plus 2 additional rowlocks must be provided. The rowlocks must be attached to the lifeboat by separate chains so as to be available for immediate use, except that the 2 additional spare rowlocks must be carried in the equipment locker or stowed near the stern if no locker is fitted. The rowlocks and rowlock sockets must be distributed so as to provide the maximum amount of single banked oars practicable.

(cc) Rudder and tiller. The rudder and tiller must be constructed in accordance with §160.035–3(t) of this chapter.

(dd) Sea anchor. The sea anchor must be of an approved type.

(ee) Signals, distress, floating orange smoke. The floating orange smoke distress signals must be approved under subpart 160.022 of this chapter. The signals must be replaced no later than the first annual stripping, cleaning, and overhaul of the lifeboat after the date of expiration.

(ff) Signals, distress, red hand flare. A unit consists of twelve hand red flare distress signals approved under subpart 160.021 or 160.023 of this chapter and stored in a watertight container. Signals must be replaced no later than the first annual stripping, cleaning, and overhaul of the lifeboat after the date of expiration.

(gg) Signals, distress, red parachute flare. A unit consists of twelve parachute red flare distress signals with an approved means of projection approved under subparts 160.024 and 160.028 respectively; or twelve approved hand-held rocket-propelled parachute red flare distress signals approved under subpart 160.036. Flares must be stored in a portable watertight container. Flares must be replaced no later than the first annual stripping, cleaning, and overhaul of the lifeboat after the date of expiration.

(hh) Tool kit. The tool kit must consist of at least the following tools in a suitable container:

(1) One 12-ounce ball peen hammer.

(2) One screwdriver with 6-inch blade.

(3) One pair 8-inch slip joint pliers.

(4) One 8-inch adjustable end wrench.

(ii) Water. (1) For each person the lifeboat is certified to carry, there must be provided three quarts of drinking water in containers approved under subpart 160.026. Water must be replaced no later than the first annual stripping, cleaning, and overhaul of the lifeboat after date of expiration.

(2) One or more desalting kits, approved under subpart 160.058 of this chapter, may be used as a substitute for one-third of the drinking water required.

(3) The drinking water must be stowed in drinking water tanks, lockers, or other compartments providing suitable protection.

(jj) Whistle, signaling. The whistle must be of the ball-type or multi-tone type, of corrosion resistant construction, with a 36-inch lanyard attached, and in good working order.

(kk) Fishing kit. The fishing kit must be approved under subpart 160.061 of this chapter.

(ll) Cover, protecting. The cover must be of highly visible color and capable of protecting the occupants against exposure.

(mm) Table of lifesaving signals. The table of lifesaving signals must be in accordance with the provisions of Chapter V, Regulation 16, of the International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, and must be printed on water resistant paper.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by CGD 95–072, 60 FR 50468, Sept. 29, 1995]

§ 169.535   Required equipment for lifefloats.
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Each lifefloat must be equipped in accordance with Table 169.535. The equipment is described in §169.537.

Table 169.535

Letter identification and ItemNumber required for each lifefloat
Exposed and partially protected waterProtected water
(a) Boathook11
(b) Lifeline11
(c) Paddles44
(d) Painter11
(e) Water light1None
§ 169.537   Description of equipment for lifefloats.
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(a) Boathook. Each boathook must be of the single hook ball point type. Boathook handles must be of clear grained white ash, or equivalent, not less than 6 feet long and 11/2inches in diameter.

(b) Lifeline and pendants. The lifeline and pendants must be as furnished by the manufacturer with approved life floats. Replacement lifelines and pendants must meet the requirements in subpart 160.010 of this chapter.

(c) Paddles. Paddles must be not less than 5 feet long.

(d) Painter. The painter must—

(1) Be at least 30m (100 ft.) long, but not less than 3 times the distance between the deck on which the life float(s) are stowed and the light draft of the vessel,

(2) Have a breaking strength of at least 6.7 KN (1500 lbs.), except that if the capacity of the life float is 50 persons or more, the breaking strength must be at least 13.4 KN (3000 lbs.),

(3) Be of a dark color, if synthetic, or of a type certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light, and

(4) Be stowed in such a way it runs freely when the life float floats away from the sinking vessel.

(e) Water light. The water light must be approved under subpart 161.010 of this chapter. The water light must be attached to the lifefloat by a 12-thread manila or equivalent synthetic lanyard 3 fathoms in length.

Personal Flotation Devices
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§ 169.539   Type required.
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All personal flotation devices (PFDs) must be either—

(a) A Type I approved under subpart 160.055, 160.002, or 160.005 of Subchapter Q (specification) of this chapter; or

(b) a Type V approved specifically for sailing school vessel use under subpart 160.064 or 160.077 of Subchapter Q of this chapter; or

(c) a Type II approved under subparts 160.047, 160.052, or 160.060 or a Type III approved under subpart 160.064 if the vessel carries exposure suits or Type V exposure PFDs, in accordance with section 169.551.

§ 169.541   Number required.
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Each vessel must be provided with an approved adult personal flotation device of an appropriate size for each person carried. In addition, unless the service is such that children are never carried, there must be provided an approved personal flotation device of a suitable size for each child carried.

§ 169.543   Distribution and stowage.
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(a) Personal flotation devices must be distributed through the upper part of the vessel in protected places convenient to the persons on board.

(b) If practicable, personal flotation device containers must be designed to allow the PFDs to float free.

(c) Personal flotation devices for children, when provided, must be stowed separately.

(d) Lockers, boxes, and closets in which PFDs are stowed must not be capable of being locked.

§ 169.545   Markings.
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(a) Each personal flotation device must be marked with the vessel's name.

(b) Where PFDs are stowed so that they are not readily visible to persons onboard, the containers in which they are stowed must be marked “adult personal flotation devices” or “child personal flotation devices”, as appropriate, and with the number contained therein, in at least 1-inch letters and figures.

(c) Each personal flotation device carried on vessels certificated for exposed or partially protected waters service must have a light approved under subpart 161.012 of this chapter. The light must be securely attached to the front shoulder area of the personal flotation device.

(d) Each personal flotation device must have at least 200 sq. cm. (31 sq. in.) of retroreflective material attached on its front side and at least 200 sq. cm. on its back side. If the personal flotation device is reversible, retroreflective material must be applied as described above on both sides.

(e) Retroreflective material required by this section must be Type I material that is approved under subpart 164.018 of this chapter.

Additional Lifesaving Equipment
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§ 169.549   Ring lifebuoys and water lights.
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(a)(1) The minimum number of life buoys and the minimum number to which water lights must be attached must be in accordance with the following table:

Table 169.549(a)(1)

Length of vesselMinimum number of buoysMinimum number of buoys with waterlights attached
Under 10021
100 feet to less than 200 ft42
200 feet to less than 300 ft62
300 feet to less than 400 ft124
400 feet to less than 600 ft189

(2) One lifebuoy on each side of a vessel must have an attached line at least 15 fathoms in length.

(b) All lifebuoys must be placed where they are readily accessible. They must be capable of being readily cast loose.

(c)(1) All ring lifebuoys must be approved under subpart 160.050 or 160.064 of this chapter and be international orange in color.

(2) Each water light must be approved under subpart 161.010 of this chapter.

§ 169.551   Exposure suits.
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(a) This section applies to each vessel operating in exposed or partially protected waters service except those—

(1) Operating on routes between 32° N and 32° S in the Atlantic Ocean.

(2) Operating on routes between 35° N and 35° S latitude in all other waters.

(b) Each vessel to which this section applies must have for each person on board an exposure suit approved under subpart 160.171 or a Type V exposure PFD approved under subpart 160.053.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by CGD 95–072, 60 FR 50468, Sept. 29, 1995]

§ 169.553   Pyrotechnic distress signals.
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(a) All pyrotechnic distress signals must be of an approved type.

(b) Replacement must be made no later than the first inspection for certification or reinspection after the date of expiration.

(c) Except as otherwise provided in this section, each vessel must carry the following pyrotechnic distress signals:

(1) 6 hand red flare distress signals, and 6 hand orange smoke distress signals; or,

(2) 12 hand held rocket propelled parachute red flare distress signals.

(d) [Reserved]

(e) All pyrotechnic distress signals must be carried near the helm or in a location considered suitable by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

(f) All pyrotechnic distress signals must be stowed in a portable watertight container.

§ 169.555   Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).
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(a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters must have an approved Class A emergency position indicating radiobeacon (EPIRB), and each vessel certificated for partially protected waters must have an approved Class C emergency position indicating radiobeacon (EPIRB). The required EPIRB must be—

(1) Operational;

(2) Stowed where it is readily accessible for testing and use; and

(3) Stowed in a manner so that it will float free if the vessel sinks.

(b) Each vessel must have an additional Class B EPIRB for every twenty-five persons onboard, for use in the lifeboats and liferafts.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986; 51 FR 10632, Mar. 28, 1986]

§ 169.556   Work vests.
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(a) Buoyant work vests carried under the permissive authority of this section must be approved under subpart 160.053 of this chapter.

(b) Approved buoyant work vests are items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard vessels to be worn by persons when working near or over the water under favorable working conditions. Work vests are not accepted in lieu of any of the required number of approved personal flotation devices and must not be worn during drills and emergencies.

(c) The approved buoyant work vests must be stowed separately from personal flotation devices, and in locations where they will not be confused with personal flotation devices.

(d) Each work vest is subject to examination by a marine inspector to determine its serviceability. If a work vest is found not to be in a serviceable condition, then it must be repaired or removed from the vessel. If a work vest is beyond repair, it must be destroyed in the presence of the marine inspector.

Firefighting Equipment
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§ 169.559   Fire pumps.
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(a) Each sailing school vessel must be equipped with fire pumps as required in Table 169.559(a).

Table 169.559(a)—Fire Pumps

LengthExposed and partially protected water serviceProtected water service
65 feet but less than 90 feet110
90 feet but less than 120 feet2111
120 feet or greater3211

1May be driven off a propulsion engine and may be used as a bilge pump.

2Must be driven by a source of power independent of the propulsion engine and may be used as a bilge pump.

3One pump may be driven off a propulsion unit and one pump may be used as a bilge pump. Pumps must be located in separate spaces.

(b) Fire pump capacity must be in accordance with the following:

Vessel lengthMinimum capacity
Less than 90 ft5.5 m3/hr (25 gpm).
90 feet but less than 120 ft11.0 m3/hr (50 gpm).
Greater than 120 ft14.3 m3/hr (66.6 gpm).

(c) Each fire pump must be fitted with a pressure gage on the discharge side of the pump.

(d) Each vessel must have a hand operated portable fire pump having a capacity of at least 1.1 m3 /hr (5 gpm). This pump must be equipped with suction and discharge hose suitable for use in firefighting.

§ 169.561   Firemain.
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(a) Each vessel required to be provided with a power-driven fire pump must also be provided with a fire main, hydrants, hoses and nozzles.

(b) Fire hydrants must be of sufficient number and located so that any part of the vessel may be reached with an effective stream of water from a single length of hose.

(c) All piping, valves, and fittings must be in accordance with good marine practice and suitable for the purpose intended.

§ 169.563   Firehose.
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(a) One length of firehose must be provided for each fire hydrant required.

(b) Vessels less than 90 feet in length must have commercial firehose or equivalent of not over 11/2inch diameter or garden hose of not less than5/8inch nominal inside diameter. If garden hose is used, it must be of a good commercial grade constructed of an inner rubber tube, plies of braided cotton reinforcement and an outer rubber cover, or of equivalent material, and must be fitted with a commercial garden hose nozzle of good grade bronze or equivalent metal.

(c) Vessels of 90 feet or greater must have lined commercial firehose that conform to Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. Standard 19 or Federal Specification ZZ-H-451. The firehose must be fitted with a combination nozzle approved under §162.027 of this chapter.

(d) Each length of firehose must be a single piece 50 feet long.

(e) Firehose must be connected to the hydrants at all times, except that, on open decks where no protection is afforded to the hose, it may be temporarily removed from the hydrant in heavy weather and stowed in an accessible nearby location.

§ 169.564   Fixed extinguishing system, general.
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(a) Fixed carbon dioxide or halogenated extinguishing systems must be installed to protect the following spaces—

(1) The machinery and fuel tank spaces of all vessels, except where machinery and fuel tank spaces are so open to the atmosphere as to make the use of a fixed system ineffective;

(2) The paint and oil rooms and similar hazardous spaces; and

(3) The galley stove area, for vessels greater than 90 feet in length and certificated for exposed or partially protected water service.

(b) Each fixed extinguishing system must be of an approved carbon dioxide or halogenated type and installed to the satisfaction of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

§ 169.565   Fixed carbon dioxide system.
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(a) The number of pounds of carbon dioxide required for each space protected must be equal to the gross volume of the space divided by the appropriate factor in Table 169.565(a).

Table 169.565(a)

Gross volume of compartment, cubic feetFactor
Over—Not over—
050015
5001,60016
1,6004,50018
4,50020

(b) A separate supply of carbon dioxide is not required for each space protected. The total available supply must be sufficient for the space requiring the greatest amount.

(c) Controls. (1) Each control and valve for the operation of the system must be outside the spaces protected and accessible at all times.

(2) Each branch line must be fitted with an approved shutoff valve. Each valve must be kept closed at all times except to operate the particular system.

(3) The arrangements must be such that the entire charge to any space can be introduced into the space by the operation of one valve selecting the space, and one control for releasing the required amount of fire extinguishing agent. The release control must be of an approved type and located adjacent to the branch line shutoff valve.

(4) Complete but simple instructions for the operation of the system must be located in a conspicuous place at or near the releasing control device.

(5) Each control valve to branch lines must be labeled to indicate the space served.

(d) Piping. (1) The pipe and fittings for the extinguishing systems must be in accordance with the system manufacturer's approved design manual.

(2) Each pipe, valve, and fitting of ferrous materials must be galvanized.

(3) Each dead-end line must extend at least 2 inches beyond the last orifice and must be closed with cap or plug.

(4) Each pipe, valve, and fitting must be securely supported and, where necessary, protected against injury.

(5) Drains and dirt traps must be fitted where necessary to prevent accumulation of dirt or moisture. Each drain and dirt trap must be located in accessible locations but not in accommodation spaces.

(e) Discharge outlets. (1) The area of discharge outlets shall be as specified in the manufacturer's approved design manual.

(2) The discharge of the required amount of carbon dioxide must be complete within two minutes.

(f) Cylinders. (1) Each cylinder must be securely fastened and supported, and where necessary protected against injury. Cylinders must be located outside the space protected.

(2) Each cylinder must be mounted in an upright position or inclined not more than 30° from the vertical, except that cylinders which are fitted with flexible or bent siphon tubes may be inclined not more than 80° from the vertical.

(3) Each cylinder used for storing extinguishing agent must be approved and marked in accordance with Department of Transportation regulations.

(4) Each cylinder must be mounted so it is readily accessible and capable of easy removal for recharging and inspection. Cylinders must be capable of being weighed in place.

(5) Where subject to moisture, cylinders must be installed so that a space of at least 2 inches is provided between the flooring and the bottom of the cylinders.

(6) Each cylinder storage area must be properly ventilated and the temperature inside must not exceed 130 ° F.

(g) Provision must be made by means of plugs, covers, dampers, etc., to prevent the admission of air into the space protected.

(h) Systems must be fitted with a delayed discharge and an alarm bell arranged so the alarm sounds for at least twenty seconds before the carbon dioxide is released into the space.

§ 169.567   Portable extinguishers.
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(a) The minimum number of portable fire extinguishers required on each vessel is determined by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, in accordance with Table 169.567(a) and other provisions of this subpart.

Table 169.567(a)

Space protectedTotal number extinguishers requiredType extinguishers permittedCoast Guard classification
MediumMinimum size
Living space and open boats1 per 1000 cu. ft. of spaceHalon 1211 of 13012 1/2 pounds
  Foam1 1/4 gallons  
  Carbon dioxide4 poundsB-I.
  Dry chemical2 pounds
Propulsion machinery space with fixed CO2or halon system1Foam1 1/4 gallons
  
Carbon dioxide
4 pounds
B-I.
  Dry chemical2 pounds
  Halon 1211 or 13012 1/2 pounds
Propulsion machinery space without fixed CO2or halon system2Foam2 1/2 gallons
  
Carbon dioxide
15 pounds
B-II.
  Dry chemical10 pounds  
  Halon 1211 or 130110 pounds  
Galley (without fixed system)1 per 500 cu. ftFoam2 1/2 gallons
  Carbon dioxide15 poundsB-II.
  Dry chemical10 pounds
  Halon 1211 or 130110 pounds  

(b) The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, may permit the use of any approved fire extinguishers, including semiportable extinguishers, which provide equivalent fire protection.

(c) All portable fire extinguishers installed on vessels must be of an approved type.

(d) Portable fire extinguishers must be stowed in a location convenient to the space protected.

(e) Portable fire extinguishers must be installed and located to the satisfaction of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

(f) Portable fire extinguishers which are required to be protected from freezing must not be located where freezing temperatures may be expected.

(g) Each vessel must carry spare charges for at least 50 percent of each size and variety of hand portable extinguishers required. For units that can not be readily recharged on the vessel, one spare extinguisher for each classification carried onboard must be provided in lieu of spare charges.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 897, Jan. 9, 1986; 51 FR 3785, Jan. 30, 1986]

§ 169.569   Fire axes.
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(a) Each vessel must carry at least the number of fire axes set forth in Table 169.569(a). The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection may require additional fire axes necessary for the proper protection of the vessel.

Table 169.569(a)

LengthNumber of axes
OverNot over
650
65901
901202
1201503
1504

(b) Fire axes must be stowed so as to be readily available in the event of emergency.

(c) If fire axes are not located in the open or behind glass, they must be placed in marked enclosures containing the fire hose.

Subpart 169.600—Machinery and Electrical
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§ 169.601   General.
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(a) The regulations in this subpart contain requirements for the design, construction and installation of machinery on sailing school vessels.

(b) Machinery must be suitable in type and design for the purpose intended. Installations of an unusual type and those not addressed by this subpart are subject to the applicable regulations in Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) and Subchapter J (Electrical Engineering) of this chapter.

(c) The use of liquefied inflammable gases, such as propane, methane, butane, etc., as fuel, except for cooking purposes, is prohibited.

Internal Combustion Engine Installations
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§ 169.605   General.
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(a) Generators, starting motors, and other spark producing devices must be mounted as high above the bilges as practicable.

(b) Gages to indicate engine cooling water temperature, exhaust cooling water temperature and engine lubricating oil pressure must be provided and located in plain view.

(c) All electrical components of the engine must be protected in accordance with §183.410 of Title 33, Code of Federal Regulations to prevent ignition of flammable vapors.

§ 169.607   Keel cooler installations.
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(a) Except as provided in this section, keel cooler installations must meet the requirements of §56.50–96 of this chapter.

(b) Approved metallic flexible connections may be located below the deepest load waterline if the system is a closed loop below the waterline and its vent is located above the waterline.

(c) Fillet welds may be used in the attachment of channels and half round pipe sections to the bottom of the vessel.

(d) Short lengths of approved nonmetallic flexible hose may be used at machinery connections fixed by hose clamps provided that—

(1) The clamps are of a corrosion resistant material;

(2) The clamps do not depend on spring tension for their holding power; and

(3) Two clamps are used on each end of the hose or one hose clamp is used and the pipe ends are expanded or beaded to provide a positive stop against hose slippage.

§ 169.608   Non-integral keel cooler installations
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(a) Hull penetrations for non-integral keel cooler installations must be made through a cofferdam or at a sea chest.

(b) Non-integral keel coolers must be suitably protected against damage from debris and grounding by recessing the unit into the hull or by the placement of protective guards.

(c) Each non-integral keel cooler hull penetration must be equipped with a shutoff valve.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–2000–7790, 65 FR 58464, Sept. 29, 2000]

§ 169.609   Exhaust systems.
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Engine exhaust installations and associated cooling sytems must be built in accordance with the requirements of American Boat and Yacht Council, Inc. Standard P–1, “Safe Installation of Exhaust Systems for Propulsion and Auxiliary Machinery” and the following additional requirements:

(a) All exhaust installations with pressures in excess of 15 pounds per square inch gage or employing runs passing through living or working spaces must meet the material specifications of part 56 of Title 46, Code of Federal Regulations.

(b) Horizontal dry exhaust pipes are permitted if they do not pass through living or berthing spaces, terminate above the deepest load waterline, are arranged to prevent entry of cold water from rough seas, and are constucted of corrosion resistant material at the hull penetration.

(c) When the exhaust cooling system is separate from the engine cooling system, a suitable warning device must be provided to indicate a failure of water flow in the exhaust cooling system.

§ 169.611   Carburetors.
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(a) This section applies to all vessels having gasoline engines.

(b) Each carburetor other than a down-draft type, must be equipped with integral or externally fitted drip collectors of adequate capacity and arranged so as to permit ready removal of fuel leakage. Externally fitted drip collectors must be covered with flame screens.

(c) All gasoline engines must be equipped with an acceptable means of backfire flame control. Installations of backfire flame arresters bearing basic Approval Nos. 162.015 or 162.041 or engine air and fuel induction systems bearing basic Approval Nos. 162.015 or 165.042 may be continued in use as long as they are serviceable and in good condition. New installations or replacements must meet the applicable requirements of part 58, subpart 58.10 (Internal Combustion Engine Installations) of this chapter.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by CGD 88–032, 56 FR 35827, July 29, 1991]

Fuel Systems
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§ 169.613   Gasoline fuel systems.
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(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) each gasoline fuel system must meet the requirements of §56.50–70 of this chapter

(b) Each vessel of 65 feet and under must meet the requirements of §§182.15–25, 182.15–30, 182.15–35 and 182.15–40 of this chapter.

§ 169.615   Diesel fuel systems.
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(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) each diesel fuel system must meet the requirements of §56.50–75 of this chapter.

(b) Each vessel of 65 feet and under must meet the requirements of §§182.20–22, 182.20–25, 182,20–30, 182.20–35 and 182.20–40 of this chapter.

Steering Systems
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§ 169.618   General.
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(a) Each vessel must have an effective steering system.

(b) The steering system must be designed to withstand all anticipated loading while under sail, including shocks to the rudder. Additionally, the steering system on vessels with an auxiliary means of propulsion must not be susceptible to damage or jamming at the vessel's maximum astern speed.

(c) The main steering gear must be capable of moving the rudder from hard-over to hard-over at an average rate of not less than 21/3° per second with the vessel at design service speed (ahead).

§ 169.619   Reliability.
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(a) Except where the OCMI judges it impracticable, the steering system must—

(1) Provide continued or restored steering capability in the event of a failure or malfunction of any single steering system component other than the rudder or rudder stock;

(2) Be independent of other systems, including auxiliary propulsion machinery; and

(3) Be operable in the event of localized fire or flooding.

(b) A main and independent auxiliary steering gear must be provided, except when—

(1) A small vessel uses a tiller or direct mechanical linkage as the primary means of controlling the rudder; or

(2) Installation of an auxiliary steering gear is not possible.

Note: A partial reduction of normal steering capability as a result of malfunction or failure is acceptable. This reduction should not be below that necessary for the safe navigation of the vessel.

(c) The strength and reliability of any component that is not provided in duplicate must be suitable to the cognizant OCMI. Where redundant or backup equipment or components are provided to meet the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the following must be provided:

(1) A means to readily transfer from the failed equipment or component to the backup.

(2) Readily available tools or equipment necessary to make the transfer.

(3) Instructions for transfer procedures, posted at the main steering location.

(4) A means to steady the rudder while making the transfer.

§ 169.621   Communications.
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A reliable means of voice communications must be provided between the main steering location and each alternate steering location.

§ 169.622   Rudder angle indicators.
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Each vessel must have a rudder angle indicator at the main steering location that meets the requirements of §113.40–10 of this chapter, except where a tiller or direct mechanical linkage is the primary means of controlling the rudder.

§ 169.623   Power-driven steering systems.
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(a) Power-driven steering systems must have means to be brought into operation from a dead ship condition, without external aid. The system must automatically resume operation after an electric power outage.

(b) Control of power-driven steering systems from the main steering control location must include, as applicable—

(1) Control of any necessary ancillary device (motor, pump, valve, etc.);

(2) A pilot light to indicate operation of each power unit; and

(3) Visual and audible alarms to indicate loss of power to the control system or power units and overload of electric motors.

(c) Overcurrent protection for steering system electric circuits must meet §111.93–11 of this chapter, as applicable.

Ventilation
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§ 169.625   Compartments containing diesel machinery.
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(a) Spaces containing machinery must be fitted with adequate dripproof ventilators, trunks, louvers, etc., to provide sufficient air for proper operation of the propulsion and auxiliary engines.

(b) Air-cooled propulsion and auxiliary engines installed below deck must be fitted with air intake ducts or piping from the weather deck. The ducts or piping must be arranged and supported to safely sustain stresses induced by weight and engine vibration and to minimize transfer of vibration to the supporting structure. Prior to installing ventilation for the engines, plans or sketches showing the machinery arrangement including air intakes, exhaust stack, method of attachment of ventilation ducts to the engine, location of spark arresting mufflers and capacity of ventilation blowers must be submitted to the OCMI for approval.

(c) Spaces containing machinery must be fitted with at least two ducts to furnish natural or mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation. One duct must extend to a point near the bottom of the compartment, and be installed so that the ordinary collection of water in the bilge will not trap the duct. Where forced ventilation is installed, the duct extending to the bottom of the compartment must be the exhaust. The total inlet area and the total outlet area of ventilation ducts must be not less than one square inch for each foot of beam of the vessel. These minimum areas must be increased when such ducts are considered part of the air supply to the engines.

(d) All ducts must be of rigid permanent noncombustible construction, properly fastened, supported, and reasonably gastight from end to end.

(e) All supply ducts for ventilation purposes must be provided with cowls or scoops having a free area not less than twice the required duct area. When the cowls or scoops are screened, the mouth area must be increased to compensate for the area of the screen wire. Dampers are prohibited in supply ducts. Cowls or scoops must be kept open at all times except when weather would endanger the vessel if the openings were not temporarily closed. Supply and exhaust openings must not be located where the natural flow of air is unduly obstructed, or adjacent to possible sources of vapor ignition, and must not be located where exhaust air may be taken into the supply vents.

§ 169.627   Compartments containing diesel fuel tanks.
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Unless they are adequately ventilated, enclosed compartments or spaces containing diesel fuel tanks and no machinery must be provided with a gooseneck vent of not less than 21/2inches in diameter. The vent opening must not be located adjacent to possible sources of vapor ignition.

§ 169.629   Compartments containing gasoline machinery or fuel tanks.
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Spaces containing gasoline machinery or fuel tanks must have natural supply and mechanical exhaust ventilation meeting the requirements of American Boat and Yacht Council Standard H–2.5, “Design and Construction; Ventilation of Boats Using Gasoline.

§ 169.631   Separation of machinery and fuel tank spaces from accommodation spaces.
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(a) Machinery and fuel tank spaces must be separated from accommodation spaces by watertight or vapor tight bulkheads of double diagonal wood, marine plywood, steel plate, or equivalent construction.

(b) On vessels less than 90 feet in length, segregation may be by means of a watertight or vapor tight engine box.

Piping Systems
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§ 169.640   General.
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(a) Vital piping systems, as defined in §169.642 of this subpart, must meet the material and pressure design requirements of Subchapter F of this chapter.

(b) Except as provided in this paragraph, nonmetallic piping system materials must meet the applicable requirements of 46 CFR 56.60–25.

(1) Rigid nonmetallic materials are acceptable for use in bilge, ballast, and machinery-connected piping systems on vessels less than 120 feet in length, provided that bilge and fire systems do not use the same piping.

(2) Nonmetallic piping is prohibited in fuel systems except where flexible hose is permitted.

(3) Rigid nonmetallic materials may be used in non-vital systems.

§ 169.642   Vital systems.
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For the purpose of this part, the following are considered vital systems—

(a) A marine engineering system identified by the OCMI as being crucial to the survival of the vessel or to the protection of the personnel on board; and

(b) On vessels greater than 120 feet in length—

(1) Bilge system;

(2) Ballast system;

(3) Fire protection system;

(4) Fuel oil system; and

(5) Steering and steering control system.

Bilge Systems
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§ 169.650   General.
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All vessels must be provided with a satisfactory arrangement for draining any compartment, other than small buoyancy compartments, under all practical conditions. Sluice valves are not permitted in watertight bulkheads except as specified in §169.652(a).

§ 169.652   Bilge piping.
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(a) All vessels of 26 feet in length and over must be provided with individual bilge lines and suction for each compartment except that the space forward of the collision bulkhead may be serviced by a sluice valve or portable bilge pump if the arrangement of the vessel is such that ordinary leakage can be removed this way.

(b) The bilge pipe on vessels 65 feet in length and under must be not less than one inch nominal pipe size. On vessels greater than 65 but less than 120 feet in length the bilge pipe must be not less than one and one-half inches. Piping on vessels of 120 feet or greater or of 100 gross tons or greater must meet the requirements contained in §56.50–50 of this chapter.

(c) Each bilge suction must be fitted with a suitable strainer having an open area not less than three times the area of the bilge pipe.

(d) Each individual bilge suction line must be led to a central control point or manifold. Each line must be provided with a stop valve at the control point or manifold and a check valve at some accessible point in the bilge line, or a stop-check valve located at the control point or manifold.

(e) Each bilge pipe piercing the collision bulkhead must be fitted with a screw-down valve located on the forward side of the collision bulkhead and operable from above the weather deck.

§ 169.654   Bilge pumps.
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(a) Vessels of less than 65 feet in length must have a portable hand bilge pump having a maximum capacity of 5 gpm.

(b) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, vessels of 26 feet but less than 40 feet in length must have a fixed hand bilge pump or fixed power bilge pump having a minimum capacity of 10 gpm. If a fixed hand pump is installed, it must be operable from on deck.

(c) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, vessels of 40 feet but less than 65 feet must have a fixed power bilge pump having a minimum capacity of 25 gpm.

(d) Vessels of 65 feet in length but less than 120 feet and under 100 gross tons must have two fixed power bilge pumps having a combined minimum capacity of 50 gpm.

(e) Vessels of 120 feet or greater and vessels of 100 gross tons and over must have two fixed power pumps meeting the capacity requirements of §56.50–55(c) of this chapter.

(f) Each power driven bilge must be self priming.

(g) Each fixed bilge pump required by this section must be permanently connnected to the bilge main.

(h) Bilge pumps may also be connected to the firemain provided that the bilge system and firemain system may be operated simultaneously.

Electrical
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§ 169.662   Hazardous locations.
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Electrical equipment must not be installed in lockers that are used to store paint, oil, turpentine, or other flammable liquids unless the equipment is explosion-proof or intrinsically safe in accordance with §111.105–9 or §111.105–11 of this chapter.

Electrical Installations Operating at Potentials of Less Than 50 Volts on Vessels of Less Than 100 Gross Tons
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§ 169.664   Applicability.
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The requirements in this subpart apply to electrical installations operating at potentials of less than 50 volts on vessels of less than 100 gross tons.

§ 169.665   Name plates.
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Each generator, motor and other major item f power equipment must be provided with a name plate indicating the manufacturer's name, its rating in volts and amperes or in volts and watts and, when intended for connection to a normally grounded supply, the grounding polarity.

§ 169.666   Generators and motors.
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(a) Each vessel of more than 65 feet in length having only electrically driven fire and bilge pumps must have two generators. One of these generators must be driven by a means independent of the auxiliary propulsion plant. A generator that is not independent of the auxiliary propulsion plant must meet the requirements of §111.10–4(c) of this chapter.

(b) Each generator and motor must be in a location that is accessible, adequately ventilated, and as dry as practicable.

(c) Each generator and motor must be mounted as high as practicable above the bilges to avoid damage by splash and to avoid contact with low lying vapors.

(d) Each generator must be protected from overcurrent by a circuit breaker, fuse or an overcurrent relay.

§ 169.667   Switchboards.
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(a) Each switchboard must be in as dry a location as praticable, accessible, protected from inadvertent entry, and adequately ventilated. All uninsulated current carrying parts must be mounted on nonabsorbent, noncombustible, high dielectric insulating material.

(b) Each switchboard must be—

(1) Totally enclosed; and

(2) Of the dead front type.

(c) Each ungrounded conductor of a circuit must have at the point of attachment to the power source either—

(1) A Circuit breaker; or

(2) A switch and fuse.

(d) Each switch other than one mounted on a switchboard must be of the enclosed type.

§ 169.668   Batteries.
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(a) Each battery must be in a location that allows the gas generated in charging to be easily dissipated by natural or induced ventilation.

(b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a battery must not be located in the same compartment with a gasoline tank or gasoline engine.

(c) If compliance with paragraph (b) of this section is not practicable, the battery must be effectively screened by a cage or similar structure to minimize the danger of accidental spark through dropping a metal object across the terminals.

(d) Each battery must be located as high above the bilges as practicable and secured against shifting with motion of the vessel. Each battery and battery connection must be accessible so as to permit removal.

(e) All connections must be made to battery terminals with permanent type connectors. Spring clips or other temporary type clamps may not be used.

(f) Each battery must be located in a tray of lead or other suitable material resistant to deteriorating action by the electrolyte.

(g) Each battery charger intended for connection to a commercial supply voltage must employ a transformer of the isolating type. An ammeter that is readily visible must be included in the battery charger circuit.

(h) A voltage dropping resistor, provided for charging a battery, must be mounted in a ventilated noncombustible enclosure that prevents hazardous temperatures at adjacent combustible materials.

(i) The main supply conductor from the battery must have an emergency switch, located as close as practicable to the battery, that opens all ungrounded conductors.

(j) If a storage battery is not in the same compartment and adjacent to the panel or box that distributes power to the various lighting, motor and appliance branch circuits, the storage battery lead must be fused at the battery.

§ 169.669   Radiotelephone equipment.
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A separate circuit from the switchboard must be provided for each radiotelephone installation.

§ 169.670   Circuit breakers.
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Each circuit breaker must be of the manually reset type designed for—

(a) Inverse time delay;

(b) Instantaneous short circuit protection; and

(c) Repeated opening of the circuit without damage to the circuit breaker.

§ 169.671   Accessories.
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Each light, receptacle and switch exposed to the weather must be watertight and must be constructed of corrosion-resistant material.

§ 169.672   Wiring for power and lighting circuits.
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(a) Wiring for power and lighting circuits must have copper conductors, of 14 AWG or larger, and—

(1) Meet Article 310–8 and Table 310–13 of the National Electrical Code;

(2) Be listed as “50 volt boat cable”; or

(3) Meet subpart 111.60 of this chapter.

(b) Wiring for power and lighting circuits on new vessels must have stranded conductors.

(c) Conductors must be sized so that—

(1) They are adequate for the loads carried; and

(2) The voltage drop at the load terminals is not more than 10 percent.

§ 169.673   Installation of wiring for power and lighting circuits.
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(a) Wiring must be run as high as practicable above the bilges.

(b) Wiring, where subject to mechanical damage, must be protected.

(c) A wiring joint or splice must be mechanically secure and made in a junction box or enclosure.

(d) Unless a splice is made by an insulated pressure wire connector, it must be thoroughly soldered and taped with electrical insulating tape or the soldered joint must be otherwise protected to provide insulation equivalent to that of the conductors joined.

(e) Where ends of stranded conductors are to be clamped under terminal screws, they must be formed and soldered unless fitted with pressure terminal connectors.

(f) Conductors must be protected from overcurrent in accordance with their current-carrying capacities.

(g) Conductors supplying motors and motor operated appliances must be protected by a separate overcurrent device that is responsive to motor current. This device must be rated or set at not more than 125 percent of the motor full-load current rating.

(h) On metallic vessels the enclosures and frames of all major electrical equipment must be permanently grounded to the metal hull of the vessel by the mounting bolts or other means. Cable armor must not be used as the normal grounding means.

(i) On nonmetallic vessels, the enclosures and frames of major electrical equipment must be bonded together to a common ground by a normally noncurrent carrying conductor.

(j) For grounded systems the negative polarity of the supply source must be grounded to the metal hull or, for nonmetallic vessels, connected to the common ground.

(k) On a nonmetallic vessel, where a ground plate is provided for radio equipment it must be connected to the common ground.

(l) For grounded systems, hull return must not be used except for engine starting purposes.

Electrical Installations Operating at Potentials of 50 Volts or More on Vessels of Less Than 100 Gross Tons
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§ 169.674   Applicability.
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The requirements in this subpart apply to electrical installations operating at potentials of 50 volts or more, on vessels of less than 100 gross tons.

§ 169.675   Generators and motors.
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(a) Each generator and motor must be fitted with a nameplate of corrosion-resistant material marked with the following information as applicable:

(1) Name of manufacturer.

(2) Manufacturer's type and frame designation.

(3) Output in kilowatts or horsepower rating.

(4) Kind of rating (continuous, intermittent, etc.).

(5) Revolutions per minute at rated load.

(6) Amperes at rated load.

(7) Voltage.

(8) Frequency if applicable.

(9) Number of phases, if applicable.

(10) Type of winding (for direct-current motors).

(b) Each vessel of more than 65 feet in length having only electrically driven fire and bilge pumps must have two generators. One of these generators must be driven by a means independent of the auxiliary propulsion plant. A generator that is not independent of the auxiliary propulsion plant must meet the requirements of §111.10–4(c) of this chapter.

(c) Each generator and motor must be in a location that is accessible, adequately ventilated, and as dry as practicable.

(d) Each generator and motor must be mounted as high as practicable above the bilges to avoid damage by splash and to avoid contact with low lying vapors.

(e) Each motor for use in a location exposed to the weather must be of the watertight or waterproof type or must be enclosed in a watertight housing. The motor enclosure or housing must be provided with a check valve for drainage or a tapped hole at the lowest part of the frame for attaching a drain pipe or drain plug.

(f) Except as provided in paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section, each generator and motor for use in a machinery space must be designed for an ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. (122 degrees F.).

(g) A generator or motor may be designed for an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C. (104 degrees F.) if the vessel is designed so that the ambient temperature in the machinery space will not exceed 40 degrees C. under normal operating conditions.

(h) A generator or motor designed for 40 degrees C. may be used in a 50 degrees C. ambient location provided it is derated to 80 percent of full load rating, and the rating or setting of the overcurrent device is reduced accordingly. A nameplate specifying the derated capacity must be provided for each motor and generator.

(i) A voltmeter and an ammeter must be provided that can be used for measuring voltage and current of each generator that is in operation. For each alternating-current generator a means for measuring frequency must also be provided. Additional control equipment and measuring instruments must be provided, if needed, to ensure satisfactory operation of each generator.

§ 169.676   Grounded electrical systems.
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(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each electrical system must meet subpart 111.05 of this chapter.

(b) Ground detection is not required.

§ 169.677   Equipment protection and enclosure.
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(a) Except as provided in this section, all electrical equipment including motors, generators, controllers, distribution panels, consoles, etc., must be at least dripproof and protected.

(b) Equipment mounted on a hinged door of an enclosure must be constructed or shielded so that no live parts of the door mounted equipment will be exposed to accidental contact by a person with the door open and the circuit energized.

(c) Any cabinet, panel, or box containing more than one source of potential in excess of 50 volts must be fitted with a sign warning personnel of this condition and identifying the circuits to be disconnected to remove all the potentials in excess of 50 volts.

(d) Each distribution panelboard must be enclosed.

§ 169.678   Main distribution panels and switchboards.
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(a) A distribution panel to which the generator leads are connected, and from which the electric leads throughout the vessel directly or indirectly receive their electric power is a switchboard.

(b) Each switchboard must have a driphood or an equivalent means of protecting against falling liquid.

(c) Nonconductive deck materials, mats, or gratings must be provided in front of each switchboard.

(d) If the switchboard is accessible from the rear, nonconductive deck material, mats, or gratings must be provided in the rear of the switchboard.

(e) Metal cases of instruments and secondary windings of instrument transformers must be grounded.

(f) Each switchboard must be placed in a location that is accessible, adequately ventilated, and as dry as practicable. All uninsulated current carrying parts must be mounted on nonabsorbent, noncombustible, high dielectric insulating material.

(g) Each switchboard must be of the dead front type.

(h) Each switchboard must have front and, if accessible from the back, rear non-conducting hand rails except on vessels where the surrounding bulkheads and decks are of an insulating material such as fiberglass or wood.

§ 169.679   Wiring for power and lighting circuits.
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Wiring for each power and lighting circuit must meet subpart 111.60 of this chapter.

§ 169.680   Installation of wiring for power and lighting circuits.
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(a) Wiring must be run as high as practicable above the bilges.

(b) Each cable installed where particularly susceptible to damage such as locations in way of doors, hatches, etc, must be protected by removable metal coverings, angle irons, pipe, or other equivalent means. All metallic coverings must be electrically continuous and grounded to the metal hull or common ground, and all coverings such as pipe that may trap moisture must be provided with holes for drainage. Where cable protection is carried through a watertight deck or bulkhead, the installation must maintain the watertight integrity of the structure.

(c) Each cable entering a box or fitting must be protected from abrasion, and must meet the following requirements:

(1) Each opening through which conductors enter must be adequately closed.

(2) Cable armor must be secured to the box or fitting.

(3) In damp or wet locations, each cable entrance must be watertight.

(d) The enclosures of all equipment must be permanently grounded to the metal hull of the vessel by the mounting bolts or other means. Cable armor must not be used as the normal grounding means.

(e) On a nonmetallic vessel, the enclosures must be bonded to a common ground by a normal noncurrent carrying conductor.

(f) On a nonmetallic vessel, where a ground plate is provided for radio equipment it must be connected to the common ground.

(g) Except as provided in paragraph (i) of this section, each armored cable must have a metallic covering that is—

(1) Electrically and mechanically continuous; and

(2) Grounded at each end of the run to—

(i) The metal hull; or

(ii) The common ground required by paragraph (e) of this section on nonmetallic vessels.

(h) In lieu of being grounded at each end of the run as required by paragraph (g) of this section, final sub-circuits may be grounded at the supply end only.

(i) All equipment, including switches, fuses, lampholders, etc., must be of a type designed for the proper potential and be so identified.

(j) Except as provided in paragraph (l) of this section, each junction box, connection box, and outlet box, must have an internal depth of at least 11/2inches.

(k) For a box incorporated in a fixture having a volume of not less than 20 cubic inches, the depth may be decreased to not less than 1 inch.

(l) Each conductor, except a fixture wire within a box, must have a free space computed using the volume per conductor given in Table 169.680(l). If a fitting or device such as a cable clamp, hickey, switch or receptacle is contained in the box, each fitting or device must count as one conductor.

Table 169.680(l)

Size of conductor A.W.G.Free space for each conductor in box, cubic inches
142.0
122.25
82.50
13.0

(m) Each junction box, connection box, and outlet box for use in a damp or wet location must be of watertight construction.

(n) Each lighting fixture must be constructed in accordance with the requirements of Subchapter J of this chapter.

(o) A separate circuit from the switchboard must be provided for each radiotelephone installation.

(p) Knife switches must be so placed or designed that gravity or vibration will not tend to close them. Knife switches, unless of the double throw type, must be connected so that the blades are dead when the switch is in the open position.

(q) Circuits must be connected to the fuse end of switches and to the coil end of circuit breakers, except that generator leads or incoming feeders may be connected to either end of circuit breakers.

(r) Receptacle outlets and attachment plugs for the attachment of portable lamps, tools, and similar apparatus supplied as ship's equipment and operating at 100 volts or more, must provide a grounding pole and a grounding conductor in the portable cord to ground the non-current carrying metal parts of the apparatus.

(s) Receptacle outlets of the type providing a grounded pole must be of a configuration that will not permit the dead metal parts of portable apparatus to be connected to a live conductor.

§ 169.681   Disconnect switches and devices.
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(a) Externally operable switches or circuit breakers must be provided for motor and controller circuits and must open all ungrounded conductors of the circuit.

(b) If the disconnect means is not within sight of the equipment that the circuit supplies, means must be provided for locking the disconnect device in the “open” position.

(c) For circuits protected by fuses, the disconnect switch required for fuses in §169.683(b) of this chapter is adequate for disconnecting the circuit from the supply.

(d) The disconnect means may be in the same enclosure with motor controllers.

(e) Disconnect means must be provided to open all conductors of generator and shore power cables.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986; 51 FR 10632, Mar. 28, 1986]

§ 169.682   Distribution and circuit loads.
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(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the connected load on a lighting branch circuit must not exceed 80 percent of the rating of the overcurrent protective device, computed using the greater of—

(1) The lamp sizes to be installed; or

(2) 50 watts per outlet.

(b) Circuits supplying electrical discharge lamps must be computed using the ballast input current.

(c) The branch circuit cables for motor and lighting loads must be no smaller than No. 14 AWG.

§ 169.683   Overcurrent protection, general.
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(a) Overcurrent protection must be provided for each ungrounded conductor for the purpose of opening the electric circuit if the current reaches a value that causes an excessive or dangerous temperature in the conductor or conductor insulation.

(b) Disconnect means must be provided on the supply side of and adjacent to all fuses for the purpose of deenergizing the fuses for inspection and maintenance purposes. All disconnect means must open all ungrounded conductors of the circuit simultaneously.

(c) Each conductor, including a generator lead and shore power cable, must be protected in accordance with its current-carrying capacity.

(d) If the allowable current-carrying capacity of a conductor does not correspond to a standard size fuse, the next larger size or rating may be used but not exceeding 150 percent of the allowable current-carrying capacity of the conductor.

(e) Plug (screw in type) fuses and fuseholders must not be used in circuits exceeding 125 volts between conductors. The screw shell of plug type fuseholders must be connected to the load of the circuit. Edison base fuses may not be used.

(f) If the allowable current-carrying capacity of the conductor does not correspond to a standard rating of circuit breakers, the next larger rating not exceeding 150 percent of the allowable current-carrying capacity of the conductor may be used.

(g) Lighting branch circuits must be protected against overcurrent either by fuses or circuit breakers rated at not more than 20 amperes.

(h) Each circuit breaker must be of the manually reset type designed for—

(1) Inverse time delay;

(2) Instantaneous short circuit protection; and

(3) Repeated opening of the circuit in which it is to be used without damage to the circuit breaker.

(i) Circuit breakers must indicate whether they are in the open or closed position.

(j) Devices such as instruments, pilot lights, ground detector lights, potential transformers, etc. must be supplied by circuits protected by overcurrent devices.

(k) Each generator must be protected with an overcurrent device set at a value not exceeding 15 percent above the full-load rating for continuous rated machines or the overload rating for special rated machines.

§ 169.684   Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.
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(a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor must be provided with running protection against overcurrent. A protective device integral with the motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used.

(b) The motor branch circuit conductors, the motor control apparatus, and the motors must be protected against overcurrent due to short circuits or grounds with overcurrent devices.

(c) The motor branch circuit overcurrent device must be capable of carrying the starting current of the motor.

(d) Each manually started continous duty motor, rated at one horsepower or less, that is within sight from the starter location, is considered as protected against overcurrent by the overcurrent device protecting the conductors of the branch circuit.

§ 169.685   Electric heating and cooking equipment.
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(a) Each electric space heater for heating rooms and compartments must be provided with thermal cutouts to prevent overheating. Each heater must be so constructed and installed as to prevent the hanging of towels, clothing, etc., on the heater, and to prevent overheating of heater parts and adjacent bulkheads or decks.

(b) All electric cooking equipment, attachments, and devices, must be of rugged construction and so designed as to permit complete cleaning, maintenance, and repair.

(c) Doors for electric cooking equipment must be provided with heavy duty hinges and locking devices to prevent accidental opening in heavy seas.

(d) Electric cooking equipment must be mounted to prevent dislodgment in heavy seas.

(e) For each grill or similar type cooking equipment, means must be provided to collect grease or fat and to prevent spillage on wiring or the deck.

(f) Where necessary for safety of personnel, grab rails must be provided. Each electric range must be provided with sea rails with suitable barriers to resist accidental movement of cooking pots.

§ 169.686   Shore power.
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If a shore power connection is provided it must meet the following requirements:

(a) A shore power connection box or receptacle and a cable connecting this box or receptacle to the main distribution panel must be permanently installed in an accessible location.

(b) The shore power cable must be provided with a disconnect means located on or near the main distribution panel.

Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over
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§ 169.687   General.
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Except as provided in this subpart, electrical installations on vessels of 100 gross tons and over must meet the requirements of parts 110–113 of this chapter.

§ 169.688   Power supply.
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(a) The requirements of this section apply in lieu of subpart 111.10 of this chapter.

(b) If a generator is used to provide electric power for any vital system listed in §169.642 of this subchapter, at least two generating sets must be provided. At least one required generating set must be independent of the auxiliary propulsion machinery. A generator that is not independent of the auxiliary propulsion plant must meet the requirements of §111.10–4(c) of this chapter. With any one generating set stopped, the remaining set(s) must provide the power necessary for each of the following:

(1) Normal at sea load plus starting of the largest vital system load that can be started automatically or started from a space remote from the main distribution panel (switchboard).

(2) All vital systems simultaneously with nonvital loads secured.

(c) The adequacy of ship service generators must be demonstrated to the satisfaction of the OCMI during the initial inspection required by §169.221 of this subchapter.

§ 169.689   Demand loads.
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Demand loads must meet §111.60–7 of this chapter except that smaller demand loads for motor feeders are acceptable if the cable is protected at or below its current-carrying capacity.

§ 169.690   Lighting branch circuits.
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Each lighting branch circuit must meet the requirements of §111.75–5 of this chapter, except that—

(a) Appliance loads, electric heater loads, and isolated small motor loads may be connected to a lighting distribution panelboard; and

(b) Branch circuits in excess of 30 amperes may be supplied from a lighting distribution panelboard.

§ 169.691   Navigation lights.
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Navigation light systems must meet the requirements of §111.75–17 of this chapter except the requirements of §111.75–17 (a) and (c).

§ 169.692   Remote stop stations.
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In lieu of the remote stopping systems required by subpart 111.103 of this chapter, remote stop stations must be provided as follows:

(a) A propulsion shutdown in the pilothouse for each propulsion unit,

(b) A bilge slop or dirty oil discharge shutdown at the deck discharge,

(c) A ventilation shutdown located outside the space ventilated, and

(d) A shutdown from outside the engineroom for the fuel transfer pump, fuel oil service pump, or any other fuel oil pump.

§ 169.693   Engine order telegraph systems.
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An engine order telegraph system is not required.

Subpart 169.700—Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment
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§ 169.703   Cooking and heating.
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(a) Cooking and heating equipment must be suitable for marine use. Cooking installations must meet the requirements of ABYC Standard A–3, “Recommended Practices and Standards Covering Galley Stoves.”

(b) The use of gasoline for cooking, heating or lighting is prohibited on all vessels.

(c) The use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or compressed natural gas (CNG) is authorized for cooking purposes only.

(1) The design, installation and testing of each LPG system must meet either ABYC A–1 or Chapter 6 of NFPA 302.

(2) The design, installation, and testing of each CNG system must meet either Chapter 6 of NFPA 302 or ABYC A–22.

(3) The stowage of each cylinder must comply with the requirements for the stowage of cylinders of liquefied or non-liquefied gases used for heating, cooking, or lighting in part 147 of this chapter.

(4) If the fuel supply line enters an enclosed space on the vessel, a remote shutoff valve must be installed which can be operated from a position adjacent to the appliance. The valve must be a type that will fail closed, and it must be located between the regulator and the point where the fuel supply enters the enclosed portion of the vessel.

(5) If Chapter 6 of NFPA 302 is used as the standard, then the following additional requirements must also be met:

(i) LPG or CNG must be odorized in accordance with ABYC A–1.5.d or A–22.5.b, respectively.

(ii) Ovens must be equipped with a flame failure switch in accordance with ABYC A–1.10.b for LPG or A–22.10.b for CNG.

(iii) The marking and mounting of LPG cylinders must be in accordance with ABYC–1.6.b.

(iv) LPG cylinders must be of the vapor withdrawal type as specified in ABYC A–1.5.b.

(6) If ABYC A–1 or A–22 is used as the standard for an LPG on CNG installation, then pilot lights or glow plugs are prohibited.

(7) If ABYC A–22 is used as the standard for a CNG installation, then the following additional requirements must also be met:

(i) The CNG cylinders, regulating equipment, and safety equipment must meet the installation, stowage, and testing requirements of paragraphs 6–5.11.1, 2, 3; 6–5.11.5; and 6–5.11.8 of NFPA 302.

(ii) The use or stowage of stoves with attached cylinders is prohibited as specified in paragraph 6–5.1 of NFPA 302.

§ 169.705   Mooring equipment.
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Each vessel must be fitted with ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending upon the size of the vessel and the waters on which it operates.

§ 169.709   Compass.
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(a) Each vessel must be fitted with a magnetic steering compass.

(b) Each vessel certificated for exposed water service must have an emergency compass in addition to the one required in paragraph (a).

§ 169.711   Emergency lighting.
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(a) Each vessel must be equipped with a suitable number of portable battery lights.

(b) Each vessel of 100 gross tons and over must satisfy the emergency lighting requirements for a miscellaneous self-propelled vessel as contained in part 112 of this chapter.

(c) Each vessel of less than 100 gross tons that has accommodation spaces located below the main deck must have permanently installed lighting which is connected to a single emergency power source or permanently installed, relay-controlled, battery-operated lanterns. The lighting or lanterns must be fitted along the avenues of escape, in the wheelhouse, and in the engine compartment.

(1) A single emergency power source, if provided, must be independent of the normal power source and must be either a generator or a storage battery.

(d) The emergency power source and batteries for individual, battery-operated, lanterns must have the capacity to supply all connected loads simultaneously for at least 6 hours of continuous operations. If the emergency lighting is provided by battery power, then an automatic battery charger that maintains the battery(s) in a fully charged condition must be provided.

(e) The emergency lighting system must be capable of being fully activated from a single location.

§ 169.713   Engineroom communication system.
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An efficient communication system must be provided between the principal steering station and the engineroom on vessels which are not equipped with pilothouse controls if, in the opinion of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, this is necessary for proper operation of the vessel.

§ 169.715   Radio.
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(a) Radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations are required on certain vessels. Details of these requirements and the details of the installations are contained in regulations of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in Title 47, Code of Federal Regulations, part 83.

(b) A valid certificate issued by the FCC is evidence that the radio installation is in compliance with the requirements of that agency.

§ 169.717   Fireman's outfit.
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(a) Each vessel greater than 120 feet but less than 150 feet in length must carry one fireman's outfit consisting of—

(1) One pressure-demand, open-circuit, self-contained breathing apparatus, approved by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and having at a minimum a 30-minute air supply and a full facepiece; but a self-contained compressed-air breathing apparatus previously approved by MSHA and NIOSH under part 160, subpart 160.011, of this chapter may continue in use as required equipment if it was part of the vessel's equipment on November 23, 1992, and as long as it is maintained in good condition to the satisfaction of the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection;

(2) One lifeline with a belt or a suitable harness;

(3) One approved flame safety lamp;

(4) One flashlight listed by an independent testing laboratory as suitable for use in hazardous locations;

(5) One fire ax;

(6) Boots and gloves of rubber or other electrically nonconducting material;

(7) A rigid helmet that provides effective protection against impact; and

(8) Protective clothing.

(b) Each vessel 150 feet or greater must carry two fireman's outfits. The outfits must be stowed in widely separated accessible locations.

(c) Lifelines must be of steel or bronze wire rope. Steel wire rope must be either inherently corrosion resistant or made so by galvanizing or thinning. Each end must be fitted with a hook with keeper having a throat opening which can be readily slipped over a5/8-inch bolt. The total length of the lifeline is dependent upon the size and arrangement of the vessel, and more than one line may be hooked together to achieve the necessary length. No individual length of lifeline may be less than 50 feet in length. The assembled lifeline must have a minimum breaking strength of 1,500 pounds.

(d) A complete recharge must be carried out for each self-contained breathing apparatus and a complete set of spare batteries and bulb must be carried for each flashlight. The spares must be stowed in the same location as the equipment it is to reactivate.

(e) Protective clothing must be constructed of material that will protect the skin from the heat of fire and burns from scalding steam. The outer surface must be water resistant.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by CGD 86–036, 57 FR 48326, Oct. 23, 1992]

§ 169.721   Storm sails and halyards (exposed and partially protected waters only).
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(a) Unless clearly unsuitable, each vessel must have one storm trysail of appropriate size. It must be sheeted independently of the boom and must have neither headboard nor battens.

(b) Each vessel having headsails must also have one storm head sail of appropriate size and strength.

(c) Each vessel must have at least two halyards, each capable of hoisting a sail.

§ 169.723   Safety belts.
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Each vessel must carry a harness type safety belt conforming to Offshore Racing Council (ORC) standards for each person on watch or required to work the vessel in heavy weather.

§ 169.725   First aid kit.
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Each vessel must carry an approved first aid kit, constructed and fitted in accordance with subpart 160.041 of this chapter.

§ 169.726   Radar reflector.
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Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway.

Markings
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§ 169.730   General alarm bell switch.
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On vessels of 100 gross tons and over there must be a general alarm bell switch in the pilothouse, clearly and permanently identified by lettering on a metal plate or with a sign in red letters on a suitable background: “GENERAL ALARM”

§ 169.731   General alarm bells.
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On vessels of 100 gross tons and over each general alarm bell must be identified by red lettering at least1/2inch high: “GENERAL ALARM—WHEN BELL RINGS GO TO YOUR STATION.”

§ 169.732   Carbon dioxide alarm.
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Each carbon dioxide alarm must be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.”

§ 169.733   Fire extinguishing branch lines.
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Each branch line valve of every fire extinguishing system must be plainly and permanently marked indicating the spaces served.

§ 169.734   Fire extinguishing system controls.
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Each control cabinet or space containing valves or manifolds for the various fire extinguishing systems must be distinctly marked in conspicuous red letters at least 2 inches high: “CARBON DIOXIDE FIRE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM,” or “HALON FIRE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM,” as appropriate.

§ 169.735   Fire hose stations.
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Each fire hydrant must be identified in red letters and figures at least two inches high “FIRE STATION NO. 1,” “2,” “3,” etc. Where the hose is not stowed in the open or readily seen behind glass, this identification must be placed so as to be readily seen from a distance.

§ 169.736   Self-contained breathing apparatus.
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Each locker or space containing self-contained breathing apparatus must be marked “SELF-CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS.”

§ 169.737   Hand portable fire extinguishers.
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Each hand portable fire extinguisher must be marked with a number, and the location where it is stowed must be marked with a corresponding number. The marks must be at least1/2inch high. Where only one type and size of hand portable fire extinguisher is carried, the numbering may be omitted.

§ 169.738   Emergency lights.
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Each emergency light must be marked with a letter “E” at least1/2inch high.

§ 169.739   Lifeboats.
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(a) The name and port of the vessel marked on its stern as required by §67.15 of this chapter must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of each lifeboat in letters not less than 3 inches high.

(b) Each lifeboat must have its number plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow in figures not less than 3 inches high. The lifeboats on each side of the vessel must be numbered from forward aft, with the odd numbers on the starboard side.

(c) The cubical contents and number of persons allowed to be carried in each lifeboat must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of the lifeboat in letters and numbers not less than 11/2inches high. In addition, the number of persons allowed must be plainly marked or painted on top of at least 2 thwarts in letters and numbers not less than 3 inches high.

(d) Each oar must be conspicuously marked with the vessel's name.

(e) Where mechanical disengaging apparatus is used, the control effecting the release of the lifeboat must be painted bright red and must have thereon in raised letters either the words—“DANGER-LEVER DROPS BOAT”, or the words—“DANGER-LEVER RELEASES HOOKS”.

(f) The top of thwarts, side benches and footings of lifeboats must be painted or otherwise colored international orange. The area in way of the red mechanical disengaging gear control lever, from the keel to the side bench, must be painted or otherwise colored white, to provide a contrasting background for the lever. This band of white should be approximately 12 inches wide depending on the internal arrangements of the lifeboat.

§ 169.740   Liferafts and lifefloats.
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(a) Rigid type liferafts and lifefloats, together with their oars and paddles, must be conspicuously marked with the vessel's name and port of the vessel as marked on its stern as required by §67.15 of this chapter.

(b) The number of persons allowed on each rigid type liferaft and lifefloat must be conspicuously marked or painted thereon in letters and numbers at least 11/2inches high.

(c) There must be stenciled in a conspicuous place in the immediate vicinity of each inflatable liferaft the following:

INFLATABLE LIFERAFT NO___

____PERSONS CAPACITY

These markings must not be placed on the inflatable liferaft containers.

§ 169.741   Personal flotation devices and ring life buoys.
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Each personal flotation device and ring life buoy must be marked with the vessel's name.

§ 169.743   Portable magazine chests.
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Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY.”

§ 169.744   Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).
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Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name.

§ 169.745   Escape hatches and emergency exits.
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Each escape hatch and other emergency exit must be marked on both sides using at least 1-inch letters: “EMERGENCY EXIT, KEEP CLEAR”, unless the markings are deemed unnecessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

§ 169.746   Fuel shutoff valves.
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Each remote fuel shutoff station must be marked in at least 1-inch letters indicating purpose of the valves and direction of operation.

§ 169.747   Watertight doors and hatches.
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Each watertight door and watertight hatch must be marked on both sides in at least 1-inch letters: “WATERTIGHT DOOR—CLOSE IN EMERGENCY” or “WATERTIGHT HATCH—CLOSE IN EMERGENCY”, unless the markings are deemed unnecessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

§ 169.750   Radio call sign.
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Each vessel certificated for exposed or partially protected water service must have its radio call sign permanently displayed or readily available for display upon its deck or cabin top in letters at least 18 inches high.

§ 169.755   Draft marks and draft indicating systems.
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(a) All vessels must have draft marks plainly and legibly visible upon the stem and upon the sternpost or rudderpost or at any place at the stern of the vessel as may be necessary for easy observance. The bottom of each mark must indicate the draft.

(b) The draft must be taken from the bottom of the keel to the surface of the water at the location of the marks.

(c) In cases where the keel does not extend forward or aft to the location of the draft marks, due to a raked stem or cut away skeg, the draft must be measured from a line projected from the bottom of the keel forward or aft, as the case may be, to the location of the draft marks.

(d) In cases where a vessel may have a skeg or other appendage extending locally below the line of the keel, the draft at the end of the vessel adjacent to such appendage must be measured to a line tangent to the lowest part of such appendage and parallel to the line of the bottom of the keel.

(e) Draft marks must be separated so that the projections of the marks onto a vertical plane are of uniform height equal to the vertical spacing between consecutive marks.

(f) Draft marks must be painted in contrasting color to the hull.

(g) In cases where draft marks are obscured due to operational constraints or by protrusions, the vessel must be fitted with a reliable draft indicating system from which the bow and stern drafts can be determined.

[CGD 89–037, 57 FR 41824, Sept. 11, 1992]

Subpart 169.800—Operations
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§ 169.805   Exhibition of licenses.
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Licensed personnel on any vessel subject to this subchapter shall have their licenses in their possession and available for examination at all times when the vessel is being operated.

§ 169.807   Notice of casualty.
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(a) The owner, agent, master, or person in charge of a vessel involved in a marine casualty shall give notice as soon as possible to the nearest Coast Guard Marine Safety or Marine Inspection Office, whenever the casualty involves any of the following:

(1) Each accidental grounding and each intentional grounding which also meets any of the other reporting criteria or creates a hazard to navigation, the environment or the safety of the vessel;

(2) Loss of main propulsion or primary steering or any associated component or control system which causes a reduction of the maneuvering capabilities of the vessel. Loss means that systems, components, sub-system or control systems do not perform the specified or required function;

(3) An occurrence materially and adversely affecting the vessel's seaworthiness or fitness for service or route, including but not limited to fire, flooding, or failure or damage to fixed fire extinguishing systems, lifesaving equipment, auxiliary power generating equipment, Coast Guard approved equipment or bilge pumping systems;

(4) Loss of life;

(5) Injury causing a person to remain incapacitated for a period in excess of 72 hours; or

(6) An occurrence resulting in damage to property in excess of $25,000.00. Damage includes the cost necessary to restore the property to the service condition which existed prior to the casualty but does not include the cost of salvage, gas freeing, drydocking, or demurrage.

(b) The notice must include the name and official number of the vessel involved, the name of the vessel's owner or agent, nature, location and circumstances of the casualty, nature and extent of injury to persons, and the damage to property.

(c) In addition to the notice required, the person in charge of the vessel shall report in writing or in person, as soon as possible to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection at the port in which the casualty occurred or nearest the port of first arrival. Casualties must be reported on Form CG–2692.

(d) The owner, agent, master, or other person in charge of any vessel involved in a marine casualty shall retain for three years the voyage records of the vessel such as both rough and smooth deck and engineroom logs, navigation charts, navigation work books, compass deviation cards, gyrocompass records, record of draft, aids to mariners, radiograms sent and received, the radio log, and crew, sailing school student, instructor, and guest lists. The owner agent, master, or other officer in charge, shall make these records available to a duly authorized Coast Guard officer or employee for examination upon request.

(e) Whenever a vessel collides or is connected with a collision with a buoy or other aid to navigation under the jurisdiction of the Coast Guard, the person in charge of the vessel shall report the accident to the nearest Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection. A report on Form CG–2692 is not required unless any of the results listed in paragraph (b) of this section occur.

§ 169.809   Charts and nautical publications.
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As appropriate for the intended voyage, all vessels must carry adequate and up-to-date—

(a) Charts;

(b) Sailing directions;

(c) Coast pilots;

(d) Light lists;

(e) Notices to mariners;

(f) Tide tables; and

(g) Current tables.

§ 169.813   Station bills.
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(a) A station bill (muster list) shall be prepared and signed by the master of the vessel. The master shall ensure that the bill is posted in conspicuous locations throughout the vessel, particularly in the living spaces, before the vessel sails.

(b) The station bill must set forth the special duties and duty station of each member of the ship's company for the various emergencies. The duties must, as far as possible, be comparable with the regular work of the individual. The duties must include at least the following and any other duties necessary for the proper handling of a particular emergency:

(1) The closing of airports, watertight doors, scuppers, sanitary and other discharges which lead through the vessel's hull below the margin line, etc., the stopping of fans and ventilating systems, and the operating of all safety equipment.

(2) The preparing and launching of lifeboats and liferafts.

(3) The extinguishing of fire.

(4) The mustering of guests, if carried, including the following:

(i) Warning the guests.

(ii) Seeing that they are dressed and have put on their personal flotation devices in a proper manner.

(iii) Assembling the guests and directing them to the appointed stations.

(iv) Keeping order in the passageways and stairways and generally controlling the movement of the guests.

(v) Seeing that a supply of blankets is taken to the lifeboats.

§ 169.815   Emergency signals.
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(a) The station bill must set forth the various signals used for calling the ship's company to their stations and for giving instructions while at their stations.

(b) On vessels of 100 gross tons and over the following signals must be used.

(1) The first alarm signal must be a continuous blast of the vessel's whistle for a period of not less than 10 seconds supplemented by the continuous ringing of the general alarm bells for not less than 10 seconds.

(2) For dismissal from fire alarm stations, the general alarm must be sounded three times supplemented by three short blasts of the vessel's whistle.

(3) The signal for boat stations or boat drill must be a succession of more than six short blasts, followed by one long blast, of the vessel's whistle supplemented by a comparable signal on the general alarm bells.

(4) For dismissal from boat stations, there must be three short blasts of the whistle.

(c) Where whistle signals are used for handling the lifeboats, they must be as follows:

(1) To lower lifeboats, one short blast.

(2) To stop lowering the lifeboats, two short blasts.

§ 169.817   Master to instruct ship's company.
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The master shall conduct drills and give instructions as necessary to insure that all hands are familiar with their duties as specified in the station bill.

§ 169.819   Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.
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(a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped with lifeboats and/or liferafts.

(b) The master shall place a licensed deck officer, an able seaman, or a certificated lifeboatman in command of each lifeboat or liferaft. Each lifeboat or liferaft with a prescribed complement of 25 or more persons must have one additional certificated lifeboatman.

(c) The person in charge of each lifeboat or liferaft shall have a list of its assigned occupants, and shall see that the persons under his orders are acquainted with their duties.

§ 169.821   Patrol person.
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(a) The master shall designate a member of the ship's company to be a roving patrol person, whenever the vessel is operational.

(b) The roving patrol person shall frequently visit all areas to ensure that safe conditions are being maintained.

§ 169.823   Openings.
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(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all watertight doors in subdivision bulkheads, hatches, and openings in the hull must be kept closed during the navigation of the vessel.

(b) The master may permit hatches or other openings to be uncovered or opened for reasonable purposes such as ship's maintenance, when existing conditions warrant the action and the openings can readily be closed.

§ 169.824   Compliance with provisions of certificate of inspection.
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The master or person in charge of the vessel shall see that all of the provisions of the certificate of inspection are strictly adhered to. Nothing in this subpart shall be construed as limiting the master or person in charge of the vessel, on his own responsibility, from diverting from the route prescribed in the certificate of inspection or taking such other steps as he deems necessary and prudent to assist vessels in distress or for other similar emergencies.

§ 169.825   Wearing of safety belts.
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The master of each vessel shall ensure that each person wears an approved safety harness when aloft or working topside in heavy weather.

Tests, Drills, and Inspections
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§ 169.826   Steering, communications and control.
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The master shall test the vessel's steering gear, signaling whistle, engine controls, and communications equipment prior to getting underway.

§ 169.827   Hatches and other openings.
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The master is responsible for seeing that all hatches, openings in the hull, and watertight doors are properly closed tight.

§ 169.829   Emergency lighting and power systems.
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(a) Where fitted, the master shall have the emergency lighting and power systems operated and inspected at least once in each week that the vessel is navigated to ensure that the system is in proper operating condition.

(b) The master shall have the internal combustion engine driven emergency generators operated under load for at least 2 hours at least once in each month that the vessel is navigated.

(c) The master shall have the storage batteries for emergency lighting and power systems tested at least once in each 6-month period that the vessel is navigated to demonstrate the ability of the storage battery to supply the emergency loads for the specified period of time.

(d) The date of each test and the condition and performance of the apparatus must be noted in the official logbook.

§ 169.831   Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).
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The master shall ensure that—

(a) The EPIRB required in §169.555 of this subchapter is tested monthly, using the integrated test circuit and output indicator, to determine that it is operative; and

(b) The EPIRB's battery is replaced after the EPIRB is used and before the marked expiration date.

§ 169.833   Fire and boat drills.
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(a) When the vessel is operating, the master shall conduct a fire and boat drill each week. The scheduling of drills is at the discretion of the master except that at least one fire and boat drill must be held within 24 hours of leaving a port if more than 25 percent of the ship's company have been replaced at that port.

(b) The fire and boat drill must be conducted as if an actual emergency existed. All persons on board including guests shall report to their respective stations and be prepared to perform the duties specified in the station bill.

(1) Fire pumps must be started and a sufficient number of outlets used to ascertain that the system is in proper working order.

(2) All rescue and safety equipment must be brought from the emergency equipment lockers and the persons designated must demonstrate their ability to use the equipment.

(3) All watertight doors which are in use while the vessel is underway must be operated.

(4) Weather permitting, lifeboat covers and strongbacks must be removed, plugs or caps put in place, boat ladders secured in position, painters led forward and tended, and other life saving equipment prepared for use. The motor and hand-propelling gear of each lifeboat, where fitted, must be operated for at least 5 minutes.

(5) In port, every lifeboat must be swung out, if practicable. The unobstructed lifeboats must be lowered to the water and the ship's company must be exercised in the use of the oars or other means of propulsion. Although all lifeboats may not be used in a particular drill, care must be taken that all lifeboats are given occasional use to ascertain that all lowering equipment is in proper order and the crew properly trained. The master shall ensure that each lifeboat is lowered to the water at least once every 3 months.

(6) When the vessel in underway, and weather permitting, all lifeboats must be swung out to ascertain that the gear is in proper order.

(7) The person in charge of each lifeboat and liferaft shall have a list of its crew and shall ensure that the persons under his or her command are acquainted with their duties.

(8) Lifeboat equipment must be examined at least once a month to ensure that it is complete.

(9) The master shall ensure that all persons on board fully participate in these drills and that they have been instructed in the proper method of donning and adjusting the personal flotation devices and exposure suits used and informed of the stowage location of these devices.

(c) The master shall have an entry made in the vessel's official logbook relative to each fire and boat drill setting forth the date and hour, length of time of the drill, numbers on the lifeboats swung out and numbers on those lowered, the length of time that motor and hand-propelled lifeboats are operated, the number of lengths of hose used, together with a statement as to the condition of all fire and lifesaving equipment, watertight door mechanisms, valves, etc. An entry must also be made to report the monthly examination of the lifeboat equipment. If in any week the required fire and boat drills are not held or only partial drills are held, an entry must be made stating the circumstances and extend of the drills held.

(d) A copy of these requirements must be framed under glass or other transparent material and posted in a conspicuous place about the vessel.

§ 169.837   Lifeboats, liferafts, and lifefloats.
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(a) The master or person in charge shall ensure that the lifeboats, rescue boats, liferafts, and lifefloats, are properly maintained at all times, and that all equipment for the vessel required by the regulations in this subchapter is provided, maintained, and replaced as indicated or when necessary and no less frequently than required by paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) The master shall ensure that:

(1) Each lifeboat has been stripped, cleaned and thoroughly overhauled at least once in each year.

(2) The fuel tanks of motor propelled lifeboats have been emptied and fuel changed once every twelve months.

(3) Each lifefloat has been cleaned and thorughly overhauled once every twelve months.

(4) Each inflatable liferaft has been serviced at a facility specifically approved by the Commandant for the particular brand, and in accordance with servicing procedures meeting the requirements of part 160, part 160.151, of this chapter—

(i) No later than the month and year on its servicing sticker affixed under 46 CFR 160.151–57(n), except that servicing may be delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel, provided that the delay does not exceed 5 months; and

(ii) Whenever the container is damaged or the container straps or seals are broken.

[CGD 83–005, 51 FR 896, Jan. 9, 1986, as amended by USCG–2001–11118, 67 FR 58541, Sept. 17, 2002]

§ 169.839   Firefighting equipment.
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(a) The master or person in charge shall ensure that the vessel's firefighting equipment is at all times ready for use and that all firefighting equipment required by the regulations in this subchapter is provided, maintained, and replaced as indicated.

(b) The master or person in charge shall have performed at least once every 12 months the tests and inspections of all hand portable fire extinguishers, semiportable fire extinguishing systems, and fixed fire extinguishing systems on board as described in §169.247 of this subchapter. The master or person in charge shall keep records of the tests and inspections showing the dates when performed, the number and/or other identification of each unit tested and inspected, and the name(s) of the person(s) and/or company conducting the tests and inspections. These records must be made available to the marine inspectors upon request and must be kept for the period of validity of the vessel's current certificate of inspection. Conducting these tests and inspections does not relieve the master or person in charge of his responsibility to maintain this firefighting equipment in proper condition at all times.

§ 169.840   Verification of vessel compliance with applicable stability requirements.
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(a) After loading and prior to departure and at all other times necessary to assure the safety of the vessel, the master shall determine that the vessel complies with all applicable stability requirements in the vessel's trim and stability book, stability letter, Certificate of Inspection, and Load Line Certificate, as the case may be, and then enter an attestation statement of the verification in the log book. The vessel may not depart until it is in compliance with these requirements.

(b) When determining compliance with applicable stability requirements the vessel's draft, trim, and stability must be determined as necessary and any stability calculations made in support of the determination must be retained on board the vessel for the duration of the voyage.

[CGD 89–037, 57 FR 41825, Sept. 11, 1992]

§ 169.841   Logbook entries.
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(a) Each vessel subject to the inspection provisions of this subchapter must have an official logbook.

(b) The master shall place all entries required by law or regulation in the logbook.

(c) A Coast Guard form “Official Logbook” may be utilized or the owner may utilize his own format for an official logbook. The logs must be kept available for review by the Coast Guard for a period of one year after the date to which the records refer or for the period of validity of the vessel's current certificate of inspection, whichever is longer.

(d) All tests, drills, inspections and notifications required in this subchapter must be entered in the official logbook.

(e) Prior to getting underway the master shall enter in the logbook the name of each sailing school student, sailing school instructor, and guest onboard, and the fact that each person was notified of the applicable safety standards for sailing school vessels as required by §169.857 of this chapter.

§ 169.847   Lookouts.
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Nothing in this part exonerates any master or officer of the watch from the consequences of any neglect to keep a proper lookout.

§ 169.849   Posting placards containing instructions for launching and inflating inflatable liferafts.
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Every vessel equipped with inflatable liferafts must have posted in conspicuous places readily accessible to the ship's company and guests approved placards containing instructions for launching and inflating inflatable liferafts. The number and location of such placards for a particular vessel shall be determined by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

§ 169.853   Display of plans.
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(a) Each vessel of 100 gross tons and over must have permanently exhibited for the guidance of the master, general arrangement plans for each deck showing the fire control stations, the various sections enclosed by fire resisting bulkheads, the sections enclosed by fire retarding bulkheads, together with the particulars of the fire alarms, detecting systems, fire extinguishing appliances, means of access to different compartments, ventilation systems and the position of dampers and remote stops.

(b) Plans must clearly show for each deck the boundaries of the watertight compartments, the openings therein with the means of closure and the position of any controls, and the arrangements for the correction of any list due to flooding.

§ 169.855   Pre-underway training.
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Prior to getting underway the master shall ensure that each sailing school student and sailing school instructor, who has not previously been instructed, is instructed in the handling of sails, emergency procedures, nautical terms, location and use of lifesaving and firefighting equipment, and the general layout of the vessel.

§ 169.857   Disclosure of safety standards.
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(a) This section applies to all sailing school vessels and all promotional literature or advertisements offering passage or soliciting sailing school students or instructors for voyages on sailing school vessels.

(b) Each item of promotional literature or advertisement that offers passage or solicits students or instructors of voyages onboard a sailing school vessel must contain the following information:

(1) The name of the vessel;

(2) The country of registry;

(3) A statement detailing the role and responsibility of a sailing school student or instructor; and

(4) A statement that the vessel is inspected and certificated as a sailing school vessel and is not required to meet the same safety standards required of a passenger vessel on a comparable route.

(c) Before getting underway the master shall ensure that each sailing school student, sailing school instructor, and guest, who has not previously been notified, is notified of the specialized nature of sailing school vessels and that the applicable safety requirements for these vessels are not the same as those applied to passenger vessels.

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