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e-CFR Data is current as of October 21, 2008


Title 46: Shipping

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PART 180—LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS

Section Contents

Subpart A—General Provisions

§ 180.10   Applicability to vessels on an international voyage.
§ 180.15   Applicability to existing vessels.
§ 180.25   Additional requirements.

Subpart B—Emergency Communications

§ 180.64   Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacons (EPIRB).
§ 180.68   Distress flares and smoke signals.

Subpart C—Ring Life Buoys and Life Jackets

§ 180.70   Ring life buoys.
§ 180.71   Life jackets.
§ 180.72   Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.
§ 180.75   Life jacket lights.
§ 180.78   Stowage of life jackets.

Subpart D—Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment

§ 180.130   Stowage of survival craft.
§ 180.137   Stowage of life floats and buoyant apparatus.
§ 180.150   Survival craft embarkation arrangements.
§ 180.175   Survival craft equipment.

Subpart E—Number and Type of Survival Craft

§ 180.200   Survival craft—general.
§ 180.202   Survival craft—vessels operating on oceans routes.
§ 180.204   Survival craft—vessels operating on coastwise routes.
§ 180.205   Survival craft—vessels operating on limited coastwise routes.
§ 180.206   Survival craft—vessels operating on Great Lakes routes.
§ 180.207   Survival craft—vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes.
§ 180.208   Survival craft—vessels operating on rivers routes.
§ 180.210   Rescue boats.


Authority:   46 U.S.C. 2104, 3306; E.O. 12234, 45 FR 58801, 3 CFR, 1980 Comp., p. 277; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1.

Source:   CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General Provisions
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§ 180.10   Applicability to vessels on an international voyage.
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A vessel on an international voyage subject to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, (SOLAS) must meet the requirements in subchapter W of this chapter for passenger vessels in the same service, instead of the requirements of this part.

[CGD 85–080, 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997]

§ 180.15   Applicability to existing vessels.
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An existing vessel must comply with the requirements of this part except as otherwise specified by this section.

(a) Before March 11, 2001, or 10 years after the vessel's keel was laid or the vessel was at a similar stage of construction, whichever is later, an existing vessel may comply with the requirements in effect for the vessel prior to March 11, 1996, for the number and type of survival craft, stowage arrangements, and launching appliances for survival craft.

(b) On or before March 11, 2001, or 10 years after the vessel's keel was laid or the vessel was at a similar stage of construction, whichever is later, an existing vessel must:

(1) Be equipped with the number of survival craft required for its route under §§180.202, 180.204, 180.205, 180.206, 180.207, or 180.208, as applicable; and

(2) Comply with the stowage and launching appliance requirements for survival craft in §§180.130 through 180.150, inclusive.

(c) A vessel that meets the following requirements shall be considered in compliance with the subdivision requirements contained in §§180.202, 180.204, 180.205, 180.206, 180.207 and 180.208:

(1) The vessel was constructed before March 11, 2001.

(2) The vessel is of not more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length and carries not more than 49 passengers;

(3) The vessel meets the standards for collision bulkheads in §179.310 of this chapter; and

(4) The vessel meets the standards for one-compartment subdivision in §§179.220 and 179.320 of this chapter, at least in way of the engine room and lazarette.

(d) Each inflatable liferaft, inflatable buoyant apparatus, life float, and buoyant apparatus on the vessel on March 11, 1996, may be used to meet the requirements of this part for these survival craft as long as the survival craft is continued in use on the vessel, and is in good and serviceable condition.

(e) New installations of lifesaving equipment on an existing vessel, which are completed to the satisfaction of the cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, (OCMI) on or after March 11, 1996, must comply with the regulations in this part. Replacement of existing lifesaving equipment installed before March 11, 1996, must meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section.

(f) A combination flare and smoke distress signal approved in accordance with §160.023 in subchapter Q of this chapter may be used on an existing vessel until the expiration date of the distress signal but no later than March 11, 1999, as one of the distress signals required by §180.68.

(g) Until February 1, 1999, a Coast Guard approved 121.5/243 MHz Class A Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacon (EPIRB) may be used to meet the requirement for an EPIRB under §180.64, if the EPIRB:

(1) Is operable;

(2) Is installed to automatically float-free and activate;

(3) Was manufactured on or after October 1, 1988; and

(4) Was installed on the vessel on or before March 11, 1996.

(h) Until February 1, 1999, a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Type Accepted VHF-FM Class C EPIRB may be used to meet the requirement for an EPIRB on a vessel operating on a Great Lakes route under §180.64, if the EPIRB:

(1) Is operable; and

(2) Was installed on the vessel on or before March 11, 1996.

(i) Until March 11, 1997, an existing vessel on a limited coastwise route, need not comply with §180.64.

(j) An existing vessel need not comply with §180.78(a)(4).

(k) An existing vessel must comply with §180.210 or may comply with the regulations for rescue boats that were in effect for the vessel prior to March 11, 1996.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 24464, May 15, 1996]

§ 180.25   Additional requirements.
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(a) Each item of lifesaving equipment carried on board a vessel but not required under this part, must be approved by the Commandant.

(b) The cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI) may require a vessel to carry specialized or additional lifesaving equipment if:

(1) The OCMI determines the conditions of the voyage render the requirements of this part inadequate; or

(2) The vessel is operated in Arctic, Antarctic, or other severe conditions not covered under this part.

Subpart B—Emergency Communications
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§ 180.64   Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacons (EPIRB).
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Each vessel that operates on the high seas, or that operates beyond three miles from the coastline of the Great Lakes, must have on board a FCC Type Accepted Category 1, 406 MHz EPIRB, installed to automatically float free and activate.

§ 180.68   Distress flares and smoke signals.
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(a) Oceans, coastwise, limited coastwise, and Great Lakes routes. A vessel on an oceans, coastwise, limited coastwise, or Great Lakes route must carry—

(1) Six hand red flare distress signals approved in accordance with §160.021 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant; and

(2) Six hand orange smoke distress signals approved in accordance with §160.037 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(b) Lakes, bays, and sounds, and rivers routes. A vessel on a lakes, bays, and sounds, or rivers route must carry:

(1) Three hand red flare distress signals approved in accordance with §160.021 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant; and

(2) Three hand orange smoke distress signals approved in accordance with §160.037 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(c) Substitutions. (1) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with §160.036 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant may be substituted for any of the hand red flare distress signals required under paragraph (a) or (b) of this section.

(2) One of the following may be substituted for any of the hand orange smoke distress signals required under paragraph (a) or (b) of this section:

(i) A rocket parachute flare approved in accordance with §160.036 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(ii) A hand red flare distress signal approved in accordance with §160.021 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(iii) A floating orange smoke distress signal approved in accordance with §160.022 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(d) Exemption for vessels on short runs. A vessel operating on short runs limited to approximately 30 minutes away from the dock is not required to carry distress flares and smoke signals under this section.

(e) Stowage. Each flare carried to meet this section must be stowed in one of the following:

(1) A portable watertight container marked as required by §185.614 of this chapter, carried at the operating station; or

(2) A pyrotechnic locker secured above the freeboard deck, away from heat, in the vicinity of the operating station.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 20557, May 7, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997]

Subpart C—Ring Life Buoys and Life Jackets
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§ 180.70   Ring life buoys.
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(a) A vessel must have one or more ring life buoys as follows:

(1) A vessel of not more than 7.9 meters (26 feet) in length must carry a minimum of one life buoy of not less than 510 millimeters (20 inches) in diameter;

(2) A vessel of more than 7.9 meters (26 feet) in length, but not more than 19.8 meters (65 feet), must carry a minimum of one life buoy of not less than 610 millimeters (24 inches) in diameter; and

(3) A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must carry a minimum of three life buoys of not less than 610 millimeters (24 inches) in diameter.

(b) Each ring life buoy on a vessel must:

(1) Be approved in accordance with §160.050 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant;

(2) Be readily accessible;

(3) Be stowed in a way that it can be rapidly cast loose;

(4) Not be permanently secured in any way; and

(5) If on a vessel on an oceans or coastwise route, be orange in color.

(c) At least one ring life buoy must be fitted with a lifeline. If more than one ring life buoy is carried, at least one must not have a lifeline attached. Each lifeline on a ring life buoy must:

(1) Be buoyant;

(2) Be of at least 18.3 meters (60 feet) in length;

(3) Be non-kinking;

(4) Have a diameter of at least 7.9 millimeters (5/16inch);

(5) Have a breaking strength of at least 5 kilonewtons (1,124 pounds); and

(6) Be of a dark color if synthetic, or of a type certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light.

(d) A vessel must carry one floating waterlight, unless it is limited to daytime operation, in which case no floating waterlight is required.

(1) Each floating waterlight must be approved in accordance with §161.010 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(2) Each ring life buoy with a floating waterlight must have a lanyard of at least 910 millimeters (3 feet) in length, but not more than 1,830 millimeters (6 feet), securing the waterlight around the body of the ring life buoy.

(3) Each floating waterlight installed after March 11, 1997, on a vessel carrying only one ring buoy, must be attached to the lanyard with a corrosion-resistant clip. The clip must have a strength of at least 22.7 kilograms (50 pounds), and allow the waterlight to be quickly disconnected from the ring life buoy.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 20557, May 7, 1996, as amended by CGD 97–057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997; CGD 85–080, 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997]

§ 180.71   Life jackets.
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(a) An adult life jacket must be provided for each person carried on board a vessel.

(b) In addition, a number of child size life jackets equal to at least 10% of the number of persons permitted on board must be provided, or such greater number as necessary to provide a life jacket for each person being carried that is smaller than the lower size limit of the adult life jackets provided to meet this section, except that:

(1) Child-size life jackets are not required if the vessel's Certificate of Inspection is endorsed for the carriage of adults only; or

(2) When all “extended size” life preservers (those with a lower size limit for persons of 1,195 millimeters (47 inches) in height or weighing 20.4 kilograms (45 pounds)) are carried on board, a minimum of only 5% additional child size devices need be carried.

(c) Except as allowed by paragraph (d) of this section, each life jacket must be approved in accordance with either §§160.002, 160.005, or 160.055 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(d) Cork and balsa wood life jackets previously approved in accordance with §§106.003, or 160.004 in subchapter Q of this section, on board an existing vessel prior to March 11, 1996, may continue to be used to meet the requirements of this section until March 11, 1999, provided the life jackets are maintained in good and serviceable condition.

(e) Each life jacket carried on board the vessel must be marked in accordance with §185.604 of this chapter.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 24464, May 15, 1996, as ammended by CGD 97–057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997; CGD 85–080, 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997]

§ 180.72   Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.
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(a) Equipment carried under this section is not acceptable in lieu of any portion of the required number of approved life jackets and must not be substituted for the approved life jackets required to be worn during drills and emergencies.

(b) Wearable marine buoyant devices that include “ski vests,” “boating vests,” and “fishing vests,” approved in accordance with §160.064 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment.

(c) Buoyant work vests approved in accordance with §160.053 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment for use of persons working near or over the water.

(d) Commercial hybrid personal flotation devices (PFD) approved in accordance with §160.077 of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment for use of persons working near or over the water. Each commercial hybrid PFD must be:

(1) Used, stowed, and maintained in accordance with the procedures set out in the manual required for these devices under §160.077–29 in subchapter Q of this chapter and any limitation(s) marked on them; and

(2) Of the same or similar design and have the same method of operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on board.

§ 180.75   Life jacket lights.
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(a) Each life jacket carried on a vessel on oceans, coastwise, or Great Lakes route, must have a life jacket light approved in accordance with §161.012 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant. Each life jacket light must be securely attached to the front shoulder area of the life jacket.

(b) Notwithstanding the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, life jacket lights are not required for life jackets on:

(1) Ferries; and

(2) Vessels with Certificates of Inspection endorsed only for routes that do not extend more than 20 miles from a harbor of safe refuge.

§ 180.78   Stowage of life jackets.
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(a) General. Unless otherwise stated in this section, life jackets must be stored in convenient places distributed throughout accommodation spaces.

(1) Each stowage container for life jackets must not be capable of being locked. If practicable, the container must be designed to allow the life jackets to float free.

(2) Each life jacket kept in a stowage container must be readily available.

(3) Each life jacket stowed overhead must be supported in a manner that allows quick release for distribution.

(4) If life jackets are stowed more than 2,130 millimeters (7 feet) above the deck, a means for quick release must be provided and must be capable of operation by a person standing on the deck.

(5) Each child size life jacket must be stowed in a location that is appropriately marked and separated from adult life jackets so the child size life jackets are not mistaken for adult life jackets.

(b) Additional personal flotation devices. The stowage locations of the personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets under §180.72, must be separate from the life jackets, and such as not to be easily confused with that of the life jackets.

Subpart D—Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment
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§ 180.130   Stowage of survival craft.
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(a) Each survival craft must be:

(1) Secured to the vessel by a painter with a float-free link permanently attached to the vessel except that a float-free link is not required if the vessel operates only on waters not as deep as the length of the painter;

(2) Stowed so that when the vessel sinks the survival craft floats free and, if inflatable, inflates automatically;

(3) Stowed in a position that is readily accessible to crew members for launching, or else provided with a remotely operated device that releases the survival craft into launching position or into the water;

(4) Stowed in a way that permits manual release from its securing arrangements;

(5) Ready for immediate use so that crew members can carry out preparations for embarkation and launching in less than 5 minutes;

(6) Provided with means to prevent shifting;

(7) Stowed in a way that neither the survival craft nor its stowage arrangements will interfere with the embarkation and operation of any other survival craft at any other launching station;

(8) Stowed in a way that any protective covers will not interfere with launching and embarkation;

(9) Fully equipped as required under this part; and

(10) Stowed, as far as practicable, in a position sheltered from breaking seas and protected from damage by fire.

(b) A hydrostatic release unit when used in a float-free arrangement must be approved under approval series 160.062 or 160.162 or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(c) A mechanical, manually operated device to assist in launching a survival craft must be provided if:

(1) The survival craft weights more than 90.7 kilograms (200 pounds); and

(2) The survival craft requires lifting more than 300 vertical millimeters (one vertical foot) to be launched.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997; 62 FR 64306, Dec. 5, 1997]

§ 180.137   Stowage of life floats and buoyant apparatus.
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(a) In addition to meeting §180.130, each life float and buoyant apparatus must be stowed as required under this section,

(b) The float-free link required by §180.130(a)(1) must be:

(1) Certified to meet §160.073 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant;

(2) Of proper strength for the size of the life float or buoyant apparatus as indicated on its identification tag; and

(3) Secured to the painter at one end and to the vessel on the other end.

(c) The means used to attach the float-free link to the vessel must:

(1) Have a breaking strength of at least the breaking strength of the painter;

(2) If synthetic, be of a dark color or of a type certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light; and

(3) If metal, be corrosion resistant.

(d) If the life float or buoyant apparatus does not have a painter attachment fitting, a means for attaching the painter must be provided by a wire or line that:

(1) Encircles the body of the device;

(2) Will not slip off;

(3) Has a breaking strength that is at least the strength of the painter; and

(4) If synthetic, is of a dark color or is of a type certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light.

(e) If the vessel carries more than one life float or buoyant apparatus in a group with each group secured by a single painter:

(1) The combined weight of each group of life floats and buoyant apparatus must not exceed 181 kilograms (400 pounds);

(2) Each group of life floats and buoyant apparatus is considered a single survival craft for the purposes of §180.130(c);

(3) Each life float and buoyant apparatus must be individually attached to the painter by a line meeting §§180.175(e)(3) (ii), (iii), and (iv) and long enough that each life float or buoyant apparatus can float without contacting any other life float or buoyant apparatus in the group; and

(4) The strength of the float-free link under paragraph (b)(2) of this section and the strength of the painter under §180.175(e)(3)(ii) must be determined by the combined capacity of the group of life floats and buoyant apparatus.

(f) Life floats and buoyant apparatus must not be stowed in tiers more than 1,220 millimeters (4 feet) high. When stowed in tiers, the separate units must be kept apart by spacers.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 20557, May 7, 1996]

§ 180.150   Survival craft embarkation arrangements.
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(a) A launching appliance approved under approval series 160.163 or a marine evacuation system approved under approval series 160.175 must be provided for each inflatable liferaft and inflatable buoyant apparatus when either—

(1) The embarkation station for the survival craft is on a deck more than 4.5 meters (15 feet) above the waterline; or

(2) The inflatable liferaft and inflatable buoyant apparatus is boarded prior to being placed in the water.

(b) An embarkation ladder, approved in accordance with §160.017 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant, must be at each embarkation station if the distance from the deck on which an embarkation station is located to the vessel's lightest operating waterline is more than 3,050 millimeters (10 feet).

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by CGD 97–057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997; CGD 85–080, 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997]

§ 180.175   Survival craft equipment.
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(a) General. Each item of survival craft equipment must be of good quality, and efficient for the purpose it is intended to serve. Unless otherwise stated in this section, each item of equipment carried, whether required under this section or not, must be secured by lashings, stored in lockers, compartments, brackets, or have equivalent mounting or storage arrangements that do not:

(1) Reduce survival craft capacity;

(2) Reduce space available to the occupants;

(3) Interfere with launching, recovery, or rescue operations; or

(4) Adversely affect seaworthiness of the survival craft.

(b) Inflatable liferafts. Each inflatable liferaft must have one of the following equipment packs as shown by the markings on its container:

(1) Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) B Pack; or

(2) SOLAS A Pack.

(c) Inflatable buoyant apparatus. Each inflatable buoyant apparatus must be equipped in accordance with the manufacturer's approved servicing manual.

(d) Life floats. Each life float must be fitted with a lifeline, pendants, two paddles, a painter, and a light.

(e) Buoyant apparatus. Each buoyant apparatus must be fitted with a lifeline, pendants, a painter, and a light.

(f) Equipment specifications for life floats and buoyant apparatus. The equipment required for lifefloats and buoyant apparatus must meet the following specifications:

(1) Lifeline and pendants. The lifeline and pendants must be as furnished by the manufacturer with the approved life float or buoyant apparatus. Replacement lifelines and pendants must meet the requirements in Subpart 160.010 of this chapter.

(2) Paddle. Each paddle must be of at least 1,220 millimeters (4 feet) in length, lashed to the life float to which it belongs and buoyant.

(3) Painter. The painter must:

(i) Be of at least 30.5 meters (100 feet) in length, but not less than 3 times the distance between the deck where the life float or buoyant apparatus it serves is stowed and the lowest load waterline of the vessel;

(ii) Have a breaking strength of at least 680 kilograms (1,500 pounds), except that if the capacity of the life float or buoyant apparatus is 50 persons or more, the breaking strength must be at least 1,360 kilograms (3,000 pounds);

(iii) Be of a dark color if synthetic, or of a type certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light; and

(iv) Be stowed in such a way that it runs out freely when the life float or buoyant apparatus floats away from a sinking vessel.

(4) Light. The light must be a floating waterlight approved under approval series 161.010 or other standard specified by the Commandant. The floating waterlight must be attached around the body of the life float or buoyant apparatus by a 10 mm (3/8 inch) lanyard, resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light, and at least 5.5 meters (18 feet) in length.

(g) Other survival craft. If survival craft other than inflatable liferafts, life floats, inflatable buoyant apparatus, and buoyant apparatus are carried on the vessel, such as lifeboats or rigid liferafts, they must be installed, arranged, and equipped as required under subchapter H (Passenger Vessels) of this chapter for passenger vessels on the same route.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997]

Subpart E—Number and Type of Survival Craft
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§ 180.200   Survival craft—general.
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(a) Each survival craft required on a vessel by this part must meet one of the following:

(1) For an inflatable liferaft—Approved under approval series 160.151 or other standard specified by the Commandant, with the applicable equipment pack, as determined by the cognizant OCMI. Each inflatable liferaft required on a vessel by this part must have a capacity of 6 persons or more. Inflatable liferafts may be substituted for inflatable buoyant apparatus or life floats required under this section;

(2) For a life float—Approved under approval series 160.027 or other standard specified by the Commandant. Buoyant apparatus may be used to meet requirements for life floats if the buoyant apparatus was installed on board the vessel on or before March 11, 1996, and if the buoyant apparatus remains in good and serviceable condition;

(3) For an inflatable buoyant apparatus—Approved under approval series 160.010 or other standard specified by the Commandant. Inflatable buoyant apparatus may be substituted for life floats required under this section.

(4) For a buoyant apparatus—Approved under approval series 160.010 or other standard specified by the Commandant. An existing buoyant apparatus may not be used to satisfy the requirements for life floats on existing vessels wishing to upgrade the total number of passengers carried on an oceans route.

(b) If the vessel carries a small boat or boats, the capacity of these boats may be counted toward life float capacity required by this part. Such boats must meet the requirements for safe loading and flotation in 33 CFR part 183, and must meet the stowage, launching, and equipment requirements in this part for the survival craft they replace.

(c) A summary of survival craft requirements is provided in Table 180.200(c).

Table 180.200(c)

RouteSurvival craft requirements
Oceans(a) cold water1—100% IBA—§180.202(a)(1).
    (i) w/subdivision2—100% LF—§180.202(a)(2).
  (b) warm water3—67% IBA4—§180.202(b).
Coastwise(a) wood vsls in cold water.
    (i) 67% IBA—§180.204(a)(1).
    (ii) w/subdivision—100% LF—§180.204(a)(2).
  (b) nonwood and vsls operating in warm water.
    (i) 100% LF—§180.204 (b) and (c).
  (c) within three miles of shore.
    (i) w/o subdivision—100% LF—§180.204(d)(1).
    (ii) w/subdivision—50% LF—§180.204(d)(2).
    (iii) w/float free 406 MHz EPIRB—50% LF—§180.204(d)(3).
Limited Coastwise (Not more than 20 miles from a harbor of safe refuge)(a) wood vsls in cold water.
(i) 67% IBA—§180.205(a)(1).
(ii) w/subdivision—100% LF—§180.205(a)(2).
  (b) nonwood vessels in cold water—100% LF—§180.205(b).
  (c) within three miles of shore—§180.205(d).
      (A) w/o subdivision—100% LF.
      (B) w/subdivision—50% LF.
      (C) w/float free 406 MHz EPIRB—50% LF.
  (d) vessels operating in warm water.
    (i) 50% LF—§180.205(c).
    (ii) within three miles of shore.
      (A) w/o subdivision—50% LF—§180.205(e)(1).
      (B) w/subdivision—NONE—§180.205(e)(2).
      (C) w/float free 406 MHz EPIRB—NONE—    §180.205(e)(3).
Great Lakes(a) same as Limited Coastwise (a) & (b)—§180.206(a).
  (b) within one mile of shore—NONE5—§180.206(b).
Lakes, Bays, & Sounds6,7(a) wood vsls in cold water.
    (i) 100% LF—§180.207(a)(1).
    (ii) w/subdivision—50% LF—§180.207(a)(2).
  (b) nonwood—50% LF—§180.207(b).
  (c) within 1 mile of shore—NONE—§180.207(e).
  (d) warm water—NONE—§180.207(c).
RIVERS7,8(a) cold water.
    (i) w/o subdivision—50% LF—§180.208(a)(1).
    (ii) w/subdivision—NONE—§180.208(a)(2).
    (iii) within one mile of shore—NONE—§180.208(d).
  (b) warm water—NONE—§180.208(b)

Abbreviations used:

ILR=Inflatable liferaft

IBA=Inflatable Buoyant Apparatus

LF=Life Float. As allowed by §180.15(d) any buoyant apparatus in use on an existing vessel on March 11, 1996, may be used to meet the requirements for LF as long as the buoyant apparatus is in good and serviceable condition.

Footnotes:

1Cold water means the cognizant OCMI has determined the monthly mean low temperature of the water is ≤ 15 °C (59 °F).

2Vessels ≤ 65 ft carrying ≤ 49 passengers built before March 11, 2001, may meet the collision bulkhead standards in §179.310 and one-compartment subdivision subdivision standards in §§179.220 and 179.320 at least in way of the engine room and lazarette in lieu of the subdivision requirements contained in this part.

3Warm water means the cognizant OCMI has determined the monthly mean low temperature of the water is > 15° C (59° F).

4Vessels operating in warm water may substitute 100% LF in lieu of 67% IBA—§180.202(d).

5OCMI may reduce primary lifesaving for seasonal or ferry type operations on the Great Lakes—§180.206(b).

6Shallow water exception—§180.207(e).

7OCMI may reduce survival craft requirements based upon the route, communications schedule and participation in VTS—§180.207(f) and §180.208(e)

8Shallow water exception—§180.208(e)C.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997]

§ 180.202   Survival craft—vessels operating on oceans routes.
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(a) Each vessel certificated to operate on an oceans route in cold water must either:

(1) Be provided with inflatable buoyant apparatus of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board; or

(2) Meet either the standards for collision bulkheads in §§179.310 in this chapter or 171.085 in subchapter S of this chapter, and the standards for subdivision in §§179.220 and 179.320 of this chapter, or the standards for subdivision and damaged stability in §§171.070 through 171.073 and 171.080 in subchapter S of this chapter, as appropriate, and be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(b) Each vessel certificated to operate on an oceans route in warm water must either:

(1) Be provided with inflatable buoyant apparatus of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 67% of the total number of persons permitted on board; or

(2) Be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

§ 180.204   Survival craft—vessels operating on coastwise routes.
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(a) Except as allowed by paragraph (c) of this section, each vessel constructed of wood certificated to operate on a coastwise route in cold water must either:

(1) Be provided with inflatable buoyant apparatus of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 67% of the total number of persons permitted on board; or

(2) Meet either the standards for collision bulkheads in §§179.310 of this chapter or 171.085 in subchapter S of this chapter and the standards for subdivision in §§179.220 and 179.320 of this chapter, or the standards for subdivision and damaged stability in §§171.070 through 171.073 and 171.080 in subchapter S of this chapter, as appropriate, and be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(b) Each vessel constructed of a material other than wood certificated to operate on a coastwise route in cold water must be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(c) Except as allowed by paragraph (d) of this section, each vessel certificated to operate on a coastwise route in warm water must be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(d) Each vessel certificated to operate on a coastwise route within three miles of land must either:

(1) Be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board; or

(2) Meet either the standards for collision bulkheads in §§179.310 of this subchapter or 171.085 in subchapter S of this chapter, and the standards for subdivision in §§179.220 and 179.320 of this chapter, or the standards for subdivision and damaged stability in §§171.070 through 171.073 and 171.080 in subchapter S of this chapter, as appropriate, and be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 50% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(3) Have on board a FCC Type Accepted Category 1 406 MHz EPIRB, installed to automatically float free and activate, and be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 50% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 20557, May 7, 1996]

§ 180.205   Survival craft—vessels operating on limited coastwise routes.
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(a) Except as allowed by paragraph (d) of this section, each vessel constructed of wood certificated to operate on a limited coastwise route in cold water must either:

(1) Be provided with inflatable buoyant apparatus of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 67% of the total number of persons permitted on board; or

(2) Meet either the standards for collision bulkheads in §§179.310 of this chapter or 171.085 in subchapter S of this chapter, and the standards for subdivision in §§179.220 and 179.320 of this chapter, or the standards for subdivision and damaged stability in §§171.070 through 171.073 and 171.080 in subchapter S of this chapter, as appropriate, and be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(b) Except as allowed by paragraph (d) of this section, each vessel constructed of a material other than wood certificated to operate on a limited coastwise route in cold water must be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(c) Except as allowed by paragraph (e) of this section, each vessel certificated to operate on a limited coastwise route in warm water must be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 50% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(d) Each vessel certificated to operate on a limited coastwise route within three miles of land in cold water must be provided with the survival craft required by §180.204(d).

(e) Each vessel certificated to operate on a limited coastwise route within three miles of land in warm water must either:

(1) Be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 50% of the total number of persons permitted on board; or

(2) Meet either the standards for collision bulkheads in §§179.310 of this chapter or 171.085 in subchapter S of this chapter, and the standards for subdivision in §§179.220 and 179.320 of this chapter, or the standards for subdivision and damaged stability in §§171.070 through 171.073 and 171.080 in subchapter S of this chapter, as appropriate, and not be required to carry survival craft; or

(3) Have on board a FCC Type Accepted Category 1 406 MHz EPIRB, installed to automatically float free and activate, and not be required to carry survival craft.

§ 180.206   Survival craft—vessels operating on Great Lakes routes.
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(a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, each vessel certificated to operate on a Great Lakes route must be provided with the survival craft required by §180.205 (a) through (e), as appropriate.

(b) Each vessel certificated to operate on a Great Lakes route within one mile of land is not required to carry survival craft if the OCMI determines that it is safe to do so, taking into consideration the vessel's scope of operation, hazards of the route, and availability of assistance.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997]

§ 180.207   Survival craft—vessels operating on lakes, bays, and sounds routes.
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(a) Except as allowed by paragraphs (d), (e) and (f) of this section, each vessel constructed of wood certificated to operate on a lakes, bays, and sounds route in cold water must either:

(1) Be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 100% of the total number of persons permitted on board; or

(2) Meet either the standards for collision bulkheads in §§179.310 of this chapter or 171.085 in subchapter S of this chapter, and the standards for subdivision in §§179.220 and 179.320 of this chapter, or the standards for subdivision and damaged stability in §§171.070 through 171.073 and 171.080 in subchapter S of this chapter, as appropriate, and be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 50% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(b) Except as allowed by paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section, each vessel constructed of a material other than wood certificated to operate on a lakes, bays, and sounds route in cold water must be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 50% of the total number of persons permitted on board.

(c) A vessel certificated to operate on a lakes, bays, and sounds route in warm water is not required to carry survival craft.

(d) A vessel certificated to operate on lakes, bays, and sounds route within one mile of land is not required to carry survival craft.

(e) For a vessel certificated to operate on a lakes, bays, and sounds route in shallow water where the vessel can not sink deep enough to submerge the topmost passenger deck or where survivors can wade ashore, the cognizant OCMI may waive a requirement for life floats, if the OCMI determines that it is safe to do so, taking into consideration the vessel's scope of operation, hazards of the route, and availability of assistance.

(f) Each vessel operating with a set schedule on a specific route that does not take it more than 20 nautical miles from a harbor of safe refuge, and that maintains a 15 minute radio communications schedule with an operations base, or participates in a Vessel Traffic Service (VTS), may be granted a reduction in the survival craft requirements of this section if the cognizant OCMI is satisfied that a sufficient level of safety exists.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 24464, May 15, 1996, as amended by CGD 97–057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997]

§ 180.208   Survival craft—vessels operating on rivers routes.
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(a) Except as allowed by paragraphs (c), (d) and (e) of this section, each vessel certificated to operate on a rivers route in cold water must either:

(1) Be provided with life floats of an aggregate capacity that will accommodate at least 50% of the total number of persons permitted on board; or

(2) Meet either the standards for collision bulkheads in §§179.310 of this chapter or 171.085 in subchapter S of this chapter, and the standards for subdivision in §§179.220 and 179.320 of this chapter, or the standards for subdivision and damaged stability in §§171.070 through 171.073 and 171.080 in subchapter S of this chapter, as appropriate, and not be required to carry survival craft.

(b) A vessel certificated to operate on a rivers route in warm water is not required to carry survival craft.

(c) A vessel certificated to operate on a rivers route within one mile of land is not required to carry survival craft.

(d) For a vessel certificated to operate on a rivers route in shallow water where the vessel can not sink deep enough to submerge the topmost passenger deck or where survivors can wade ashore, the cognizant OCMI may waive a requirement for life floats, if the OCMI determines that it is safe to do so, taking into consideration the vessel's scope of operation, hazards of the route, and availability of assistance.

(e) Each vessel operating with a set schedule on a specific route that maintains a 15 minute radio communications schedule with an operations base, or participates in a Vessel Traffic Service (VTS), may be granted a reduction in the survival craft requirement of this section if the cognizant OCMI is satisfied that a sufficient level of safety exists.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by CGD 97–057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997]

§ 180.210   Rescue boats.
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(a) A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant OCMI determines that:

(1) The vessel is sufficiently maneuverable, arranged, and equipped to allow the crew to recover a helpless person from the water;

(2) Recovery of a helpless person can be observed from the operating station; and

(3) The vessel does not regularly engage in operations that restrict its maneuverability.

(b) A vessel of not more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length is not required to carry a rescue boat unless:

(1) The vessel carries passengers on an open or partially enclosed deck; and

(2) The cognizant OCMI determines that the vessel is designed, arranged, or involved in operations so that the vessel itself cannot serve as an adequate rescue craft.

(c) In general, a rescue boat must be a small, lightweight boat with built-in buoyancy and capable of being readily launched and easily maneuvered. In addition, it must be of adequate proportion to permit taking an unconscious person on board without capsizing.

(d) On a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length operating on protected waters, a rescue boat approved under approval series 160.056 is acceptable in meeting the intent of this section. On a vessel of more than 19.8 meters operating on exposed or partially protected waters, a rescue boat approved under approval series 160.156 is acceptable in meeting the intent of this section. On a vessel of not more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length, a required rescue boat must be acceptable to the cognizant OCMI.

[CGD 85–080, 61 FR 975, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51357, Sept. 30, 1997; 62 FR 64306, Dec. 5, 1997]

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